Archive | November 27, 2012

Goldman Sachs Controls Eurozone!*

Goldman Sachs Controls Eurozone!*

 

Mark Carney, a Canadian who worked with Goldman Sachs Group Inc., in the U.K., now served as governor of the Bank of Canada and the head of the Financial Stability Board is named as the next governor for the Bank of England.

Goldman Sachs ranks #18 of the top companies that own 80% of the global economy. It was Sachs who showed Greece and other unnamed European countries how to hide its debts.

George Bush’s last Treasury secretary, was a former CEO  of Goldman Sachs, Henry Paulson was the architect of the bailout.

  • Bill Clinton’s former Treasury secretary, Robert Rubin, was with Goldman Sachs 26 years before becoming chairman of Citigroup — which in turn got a US$300bn taxpayer bailout from Paulson.
  • The current Treasury chief of staff, Joshua Bolten (Goldman Sachs), was Bush’s chief of staff during the bailout.
  • Sutherland 1993-95, Sutherland was the Director-General of the World Trade. With one foot in Goldman Sachs, and the other in Halliburton (part of the combination behind ripping of Iraqi oil), Mr. Sutherland became the Consultor of the Extraordinary Section of the Administration of the Patrimony of the Apostolic See – the chief financial adviser to the Pope.
  • Gary Gensler a former Undersecretary of the Treasury, and Assistant Secretary of the Treasury is the current director of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission.
  • Former EU Commissioner Mario Monti, an international advisor for Goldman Sachs, the European Chairman of David Rockefeller’s Trilateral Commission and also a leading member of the Bilderberg Group.
  • Mario Draghi  is the President of the European Central Bank and former Vice Chairman of Goldman Sachs International.

Goldman Sachs is a Zionist organisation. It was founded in 1869 by German-Jewish (Ashkenazi) immigrant Marcus Goldman. With son-in-law Samuel Sachs they pioneered commercial paper-  virtual money using short-term IOUs to small-time vendors in downtown Manhattan.

Repeating history, Goldman Sachs survived the global economic crash that began in 2008 after conning  many investors into non-existence to become the chief underwriter to the U.S wealthiest and most powerful corporations.

The company has been repeatedly sued by shareholders. Nicholas Maier, the syndicate manager of Cramer & Co told Rollingstone:

Goldman, from what I witnessed, they were the worst perpetrator,” Maier said. “They totally fueled the bubble. And it’s specifically that kind of behavior that has caused the market crash. They built these stocks upon an illegal foundation — manipulated up — and ultimately, it really was the small person who ended up buying in.”

 

Source*

And

Taibbi, M. “The Great American Bubble Machine.” http://www.globalresearch.ca/the-great-american-bubble-machine

Hodges, D. “The Goldman Sachs Goodfellas” http://farmwars.info/?p=7334

Watson, P.J. “Banker Coup: Goldman Sachs Takes Over Europe.” http://www.infowars.com/banker-coup-goldman-sachs-takes-over-europe/

Related Topics:

Goldman Sachs Bribes Senate for Bailout Bill!

EU Commissioner Quits After Anti-Fraud Investigation

Your Money, Their Interest – Banking Scandals Continue…

One Economy, One Government, Your World!

British Banksters Admit to Making Savers Poorer and the Rich, Richer!*

JP Morgan Chase & the Looting of Iran

80% of Global Economy Owned By a Few

Economic Freedom Global Rating

The History of Your Enslavement

Barclays Libor Case to Go to Trial*

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193 Nations Decide Internet’s Future in Dubai!*

193 Nations Decide Internet’s Future in Dubai!*

By Jennifer Martinez

Government officials from around the world will descend on Dubai next month to revise a treaty that could have a major effect on the future of the Internet.

The 193 member countries of the United Nation’s International Telecommunications Union (ITU) will meet in Dubai to update the International Telecommunications Regulations treaty for the first time since 1988. The treaty governs how telephone calls and other communications traffic are exchanged internationally.

A lot is at stake in the upcoming negotiations: Observers say some of the proposals put forward by countries for the treaty conference could threaten Internet freedom, encourage online censorship and expand a United Nations agency’s authority over the Internet.

The treaty negotiations run by the ITU will take place in Dubai over a two-week period from Dec. 3 to Dec. 14.

Ambassador Terry Kramer, a former Vodafone executive, will lead the 95-person U.S. delegation during the conference. Members of the U.S. delegation include a mix of Obama administration officials and industry representatives from Google, Verizon, AT&T, Cisco, Microsoft and Facebook. Advocacy groups and trade organizations also have representatives on the delegation.

In the run up to the Dubai conference, Kramer has made clear in a series of public appearances that the U.S. is committed to maintaining liberalized markets in the telecom industry and upholding human rights and free speech principles during the treaty negotiations.

U.S. officials and American companies have sounded alarm about proposals that would expand the scope of the treaty so it shifts from regulating telecommunications networks to regulating the exchange of information on the Internet. The U.S. has argued that the scope of the treaty should stay confined to telecommunications networks and not the Internet.

Kramer has said that countries like China and Iran are looking to propose language that could lead to online censorship and government monitoring of Web traffic. These countries say the proposals are intended to protect computer networks from online threats like cyberattacks and spam and to crack down on child pornography, but the methods they suggest to accomplish these ends would allow them to peer into “what information is flowing on the Internet,” he said during a recent talk.

Robert Dix, vice president of government affairs at Juniper Networks, said many of the proposals aimed at boosting cybersecurity or information security are simply a “guise” for countries to gain the ability to monitor Web traffic and “suppress the ability for people to share ideas” online. He warns if these proposals were ultimately adopted into the treaty, the “unintended consequence would be to legitimize censorship” at the international level.

Harold Feld, senior vice president of consumer interest group Public Knowledge and member of the U.S. delegation, echoed a similar concern.

“Taking this one step higher to an international fora where we’re imposing a set of duties that will be implemented on the ground by many different countries–each with their own different interpretation about how to balance these security concerns against free speech and due process– that’s asking to create accusations of censorship,” Feld said.

Kramer and Federal Communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski have called for cybersecurity to be kept out of the treaty talks entirely, arguing that the Dubai conference is not the appropriate venue to discuss the national security matter. They argue that the multi-stakeholder model should be upheld, where a variety of organizations advise countries on how to beef up the security of their computer systems and networks against malicious viruses and cyberattacks.

At a cybersecurity conference hosted by U.S. Central Command this month, Genachowski argued that cybersecurity rules should not be addressed in an international treaty–period.

“International regulations are simply too broad, too inflexible, and too slow to change to effectively address cybersecurity issues,” Genachowski said, according to prepared remarks.

Google rolled out an online advocacy campaign on Tuesday that voiced concerns with some of the treaty proposals and warned that some governments are trying to use the upcoming conference “to regulate the Internet.” On the campaign’s webpage, Google says that “proposed changes to the treaty could increase censorship and threaten innovation.”

The search company also warns that some countries’ proposals “would require services like YouTube, Facebook, and Skype to pay new tolls in order to reach people across borders,” which would limit people’s access to information, especially in developing countries.

The proposals Google refers to could force websites that provide content–such as Netflix, YouTube, or Facebook–to pay network operators a fee to deliver their content to consumers outside of the country they operate in, according to Larry Downes, an Internet industry analyst. He said the proposals, officially referred to as “sending party network pays” could affect Web companies that provide consumers data-heavy content over Internet networks.

The search company has also charged that the treaty negotiations are taking place behind closed doors, shutting out the public from having a say in the discussions.

Only governments have a vote at the ITU, and some of them are trying to use a closed-door meeting in December to increase censorship and regulation online,” a Google spokesperson said in an email to The Hill. “Although the ITU has helped the world develop telephone networks and radio spectrum, it is the wrong place to make decisions about the future of the Internet.”

Four representatives from Google are on the 95-person delegation representing the U.S. at the conference–more than any other company.

The U.S. has also raised concern about how the treaty proposals would affect the management of the Internet. Some countries are reportedly submitting proposals that attempt to give the ITU more authority over the Internet.

The Internet is currently overseen by a variety of public and private organizations, not one single entity.

Treaty language submitted by Russia that was publicly leaked proposed to strip the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), a non-governmental organization, of “some, most or all” of its authorities, according to Downes. ICANN, for example, is in charge of assigning domain names — or Web addresses — to websites.

Downes says the Russian proposal suggests that the ITU should assume those authorities instead.

Congress has made it clear that the existing Internet governance model should be upheld. Both the Senate and the House have passed resolutions directing the U.S. government to oppose international efforts to increase the ITU’s authority over the Internet.

But the ITU says there has been a lot of misinformation swirling in the media about the treaty.

Sarah Parkes, a spokeswoman for the ITU, said claims that the treaty will promote censorship and threaten free speech online are unfounded because the “protection of people and their right to communicate online is already enshrined in treaties that take precedence over anything that we will discuss in Dubai.”

A treaty proposal needs to have “massive support” from member countries in order to be included in the final version, Parkes argued. “You only need a small amount of dissension in the room for a [proposal] to be dropped,” she said.

Parkes also rebutted claims that the treaty would change the way the Internet is governed.

“There’s nothing that’s coming up in this conference that touches on Internet governance or proposes changing the current mandate of the organizations that run the Internet,” she said.

Source*

Related Topics:

Twitter Joins Silencing the 99%

What Happened to Our Dream of Freedom!

Bringing Internet Under UN-US Control*

Big Brother Poised to Spy on Online 24/7…*

UAE Take Big Brother Steps Towards Surveilling Society*

Cyber Intelligence Law Passed by House of Representatives

The Next Phase in Controling the Internet*

Throwing a ‘Flame’ Across Cyberspace!

Words Not to Use if You Dont Want DHS ON Your Back

Activism in the Parliament Throws Out ACTA*

Living in a Policed State…

Can You Be Detained Over Facebook!

Taking a Solar Knockout of the National Grid Seriously

Stellar Wind the Program for Personal Data on Americans!

UN Aiming for Kill Switch for the Internet*