Archive | January 8, 2014

Jesus not Allowed in School*

Jesus not Allowed in School*

The anti-religion pro-gay agendas that have been transpiring in recent months have not been so subtle as in the past. This has been aided and abetted by the more subtle comments like “…all religions are true in our hearts” of the Jesuit Pope Francis I, with quite dramatic reactions. This comes at a time, when it was noted in Halloween 2013 that a) children were being kidnapped, and b)Satanism as the fastest growing ‘religion’ in the U.S. and the U.K. ‘Jesus’ is a common name amongst South Americans, if a child with that name attended school would they force him on some level to change his name?

By Dominic Kelly

First-grader Isaiah Martinez brought candy canes to school so that he could pass them out to all of his classmates as a Christmas gift, but a religious message that was included with the sweet treats has stirred up a lot of controversy in the California school.

According to reports, the candy canes Martinez brought to school each contained the message,

“I pray that this symbol will again be used to witness to the Wonder of Jesus and His Great Love that came down at Christmas and remains the ultimate and dominant force in the universe today.”

When the teacher saw the message that accompanied the candies, the student was allegedly told, “Jesus is not allowed in school.” The teacher reportedly took the candy canes away, ripped the messages off of them, and gave them back to the student to hand out to his classmates.

Now, attorney Robert Tyler says that the boy’s rights to freedom of speech and religion have been infringed and that the family will pursue legal action if the school doesn’t issue a written apology along with a policy change that will, “prohibit school officials from bullying and intimidating Christian students and religiously affiliated students.”

“The pendulum has swung so far in the opposite direction that public schools are becoming a place of hostility toward Christian and other religiously-based worldviews,” said Tyler, who works for Advocated for Faith & Freedom, a religious rights organization. “It’s time to push the pendulum back in the right direction where kids can experience true tolerance without religiously motivated hostility from their teachers and school officials.”

District Superintendent Debra Kaplan defends the policy to remain neutral in matters of religion, but says that they will “investigate and respond to them in a manner consistent with our policies and the rights of all students of the district.”

“The District’s overriding concern was and is to honor and respect the beliefs of all students in matters of religion. To that end, the District strives to maintain neutrality in matters of religion, and to observe students’ rights of expression, in a manner that does not conflict with the rights of other students,” Kaplan said. “During the holiday season, and particularly when young elementary students are involved, this can require difficult balancing.”

Tyler says that he hopes this case will bring to light what he claims is a widespread issue of “religiously motivated bullying” by schools.

When the teacher saw the message that accompanied the candies, the student was allegedly told, “Jesus is not allowed in school.” The teacher reportedly took the candy canes away, ripped the messages off of them, and gave them back to the student to hand out to his classmates.

Now, attorney Robert Tyler says that the boy’s rights to freedom of speech and religion have been infringed and that the family will pursue legal action if the school doesn’t issue a written apology along with a policy change that will, “prohibit school officials from bullying and intimidating Christian students and religiously affiliated students.”

“The pendulum has swung so far in the opposite direction that public schools are becoming a place of hostility toward Christian and other religiously-based worldviews,” said Tyler, who works for Advocated for Faith & Freedom, a religious rights organization.

“It’s time to push the pendulum back in the right direction where kids can experience true tolerance without religiously motivated hostility from their teachers and school officials.”

District Superintendent Debra Kaplan defends the policy to remain neutral in matters of religion, but says that they will “investigate and respond to them in a manner consistent with our policies and the rights of all students of the district.”

“The District’s overriding concern was and is to honor and respect the beliefs of all students in matters of religion. To that end, the District strives to maintain neutrality in matters of religion, and to observe students’ rights of expression, in a manner that does not conflict with the rights of other students,” Kaplan said. “During the holiday season, and particularly when young elementary students are involved, this can require difficult balancing.”

Tyler says that he hopes this case will bring to light what he claims is a widespread issue of “religiously motivated bullying” by schools.

Source*

Related Topics:

An Ancient Take on the Crucifixion

War on Faith and Family Continues

Family that Homeschooled their Children Harassed from Germany to France, the US and Back Again*

The New Pope!

The ‘Black Pope’

Mindfulness Stops Negativity from Taking Over*

Mindfulness Stops Negativity from Taking Over*

the jihad an nafs of natureDid you ever get into a heated argument with someone over a meaningless issue, only to find that encounter constantly replaying itself in your head, as if it’s stuck to you like glue? You don’t want to think of the other person yet now there’s no getting away from them; you’re stuck with them. Despite the situation or encounter being well over, it keeps coming up again in your mind.

Soon after Nelson Mandela’s release after twenty-seven years in jail, President Bill Clinton asked Mandela if he was angry with his jailors the day he finally walked away them.

“Surely,” Clinton asked, “You must have felt some anger?”

Mandela agreed that, yes, alongside the joy of being free, he also felt great anger.

“But,” he added, “I valued my freedom more, and I knew that if I maintained my anger I would still be a prisoner.”

This is a brilliant example of recognizing the effect anger has: one of keeping us a prisoner to ourselves. It also shows that we always have a choice to either be aware or be a victim. For instance, imagine your mind is like a beautiful garden and you let a pig into it. You will then have a very hard time getting that pig out, as pigs are stubborn and won’t budge, especially as they love tasty gardens! In the same way negativity, like a pig, won’t budge or leave us alone but imprisons us within ourselves. That’s where mindfulness comes in.

Mindfulness is being completely present with whatever we are feeling, thinking, or experiencing, purposefully paying attention to whatever arises in the moment. So it’s being aware of negative thoughts and feelings, and me-centeredness, as much as it’s being aware of positive feelings such as love and kindness. Such mindful awareness is nonjudgmental; it doesn’t condemn or discriminate. It is simply being aware of what is.

In this way, the stickiness of negativity doesn’t sneak up on us unawares or take us over, so we don’t end up with a garden full of pigs. Normally an angry encounter, self-pity, depression, hopelessness, or any one of a myriad of self-depreciating states, will push others away, condemn, and make everything wrong except itself. Certainly all the negative reactions that arise during moments of discord can cause great anguish, but our own anger does us far more emotional harm than someone else’s words or actions. Our heart goes out of reach and we lose touch with our feelings. There’s no compromise, no chance for dialogue, just “I am right and you are wrong.”

Being mindful is like a dear friend who enables us to know and embrace ourselves with kindness. Mindfulness means we don’t get locked out of our heart and throw away the key. Rather, we can watch how negativity distracts the mind and makes such a song and dance, and we just keep breathing and watching as it goes on its jolly way.

Which means mindfulness is like Teflon as nothing sticks! As our partner, neuroscientist Brian Jones says, “Mindfulness is the first step to being free of anger and all the obstacles that limit peace of mind, inner freedom, and true happiness.”

Practice: Start by choosing just one thing to be mindful of, such as your breathing, or the movement of your body as you walk. As you do this, so you’ll naturally become mindful of other things too, such as physical sensations or feelings.

To become aware of your breath, find a comfortable place to sit with your back upright. Close your eyes and simply watch the natural flow of the breath. There is a difference between watching the breath and controlling your breathing. Here you are just watching. To help you focus, you can silently repeat “Breathing in, breathing out” with each breath.

Source*

Related Topics:

Body Atlas of Human Emotions*

The Inner Technology of Islam