Archive | October 8, 2015

Putin Blows the Whistle on the Who and the Why of ISIS*

Putin Blows the Whistle on the Who and the Why of ISIS*
By Sophie McAdam
This short video showing Vladimir Putin answering a question on ISIS from a U.S. journalist was filmed at the Valdai International Discussion Club in late 2014. While millions of patriotic Americans still believe the simple narrative of ‘Russia is bad, USA is good’, Putin’s explosive comments blow that mindset right out of the water- and they also clearly explain why the Russian President has just decided to send in his military to support Assad’s fight against the Islamic State. After telling the audience that (unlike Obama’s view of him) he does not consider the USA a threat to Russia, Putin begins responding to a question about the ISIS problem.

The President begins:

“Well who on earth armed them? Who armed the Syrians who were fighting with Assad? Who created the necessary political climate that facilitated this situation? Who pushed for the delivery of arms to the region?”

Yes, you guessed it: he’s talking about the USA. Putin continues:

“Do you really not understand who is fighting in Syria? They are mercenaries, mostly. Do you understand they are paid money? Mercenaries fight for whichever side pays more. So they arm them and pay them a certain amount. I even know what these amounts are.” He explains how this insane foreign policy has backfired on the United States: the mercenaries don’t give back the arms, and when they find out they can earn more money fighting for ISIS, they swap sides- taking the USA’s weapons with them, and occupying the oil fields.But who is buying the oil from these terrorists, Putin asks, and why are sanctions not applied to those who purchase it?

“Do you think the USA doesn’t know who is buying the oil?” Putin asks his audience defiantly. “Is it not their allies that are buying oil from ISIS?” Putin then points out that the USA certainly has the power to persuade their allies to stop buying oil from the mercenaries who have deflected to the Islamic State. But, he suggests (here’s where it gets interesting) “they do not wish to influence them.”

Putin claims that in those areas of Syria where ISIS are extracting oil and paying mercenaries great rates of pay, more and more Syrian ‘rebels’ (anti-Assad fighters who were supposed to be on our side) are joining the Islamic State. “So you support them, arm them, and tomorrow they join ISIS. Can they not think a step ahead?” he says scathingly about US foreign policy. “I consider this absolutely unprofessional politics. We must support civilized, democratic opposition in Syria. We don’t stand for this kind of politics of the USA. We think it is wrong.”

If this is true- and concrete evidence suggests it is- Putin’s tirade is very difficult to argue with. Sure, the Russian President has a hell of a lot to answer for, but who is the real terrorist in this situation? Could it be that the USA was also behind the Ukrainian coup all along, supported by its minions in the corporate press who sought to lay the blame on Russia’s doorstep? After all, it was Putin, not Obama, who extended an olive branch to the American people by writing an op-ed in the New York Times in 2013 calling for peace and co-operation between the two powers.

Putin’s comments back up what many have been saying about ISIS and its strong connection to the USA since the start of this crisis. Please share this video to raise awareness of which war-mongering superpower is really to blame for the majority of the misery in this world. You might also like to check out Putin’s United Nations meeting speech late last month, where he talks more about these themes and asks the USA and its allies with reference to Syria: “Now do you realize what you have done?”

Source*

Related Topics:

Brzezinski to Putin: Stop hitting OUR al-Qaeda or it’s World War III*

Solzhenitsyn on Western Decadence and Its Remedy*

National Cyber Security Centre Employee Suspended After ‘Revealing’ that “ISIS is a Zionist Plot”*

Stop the International War of Genocide on Syrians Catholic Patriarch Demands*

Ancient Ancestors Had More DNA Than We Do Now*

Ancient Ancestors Had More DNA Than We Do Now*

By Liz Leafloor

Adding to the number of unsolved mysteries regarding the ancient origins of humanity and the biology of our species, scientists have discovered that we have less DNA now than our ancient ancestors possessed. Are we de-evolving?

A study published this week in the journal Science has found that modern humans lost DNA as we evolved after our split from apes. Our ancient ancestors, early humans, possessed substantially more amounts of genetic data than we do now. This surprising discovery raises many questions, the most obvious one being: why did we lose all that genetic information? Also, what difference has the loss made?

The short answer is: we don’t know yet.

According to news website Gizmodo, the team of researchers led by Professor Evan Eichler, geneticist at the Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, sequenced the genomes of 236 individuals from 125 distinct populations. They found that Homo sapiens have shed approximately 40.7 million base pairs of DNA after breaking from our closest living relatives, chimpanzees, around 13 million years ago.

Map of the 125 populations sampled in the study and their relation to each other. (P. Sudmandt et al 2015)

The genome of modern humans now contains 3 billion base pairs of DNA (complex molecules which contain all of the information necessary to build and maintain an organism, the building blocks of life), and even then scientists are unsure how much of that number is so-called “junk DNA”—genomic data whose function, if it has any, is not understood—but they do assert that at least 27.96 million of the base pairs lost were unique.

Common relationships were traced via DNA deletions among groups of humans. The longer lines show groups with more missing DNA. (P. Sudmandt et al 2015)

 

Have modern humans beneficially shed superfluous DNA, or have we lost something important over the generations?

Eichler proposes that a migration out of Africa reduced the human population in new areas and played a role in the loss of DNA.

Study authors write, “the breadth of the dataset allowed us to reconstruct the structure and content of the ancestral human genome prior to human migration and subsequent gene loss.’

‘As expected, Africans were more likely to show evidence of these ancestral sequences compared to non-African populations, as the latter have experienced more population bottlenecks and thus retained less of the ancestral human diversity.” Meaning that those individuals who were more connected with Africa had retained more DNA than those who had descended from migrated populations.

MailOnline reports, “The human genome has around three billion base pairs, which reside in 23 chromosomes in the heart of almost every cell in our body. The average gene in the human genome is around 765 base pairs long, meaning humans could have lost the equivalent of up to 37,000 genes since splitting from our ape cousins.”

Adding to this mix is the historic breeding of modern humans with the now extinct Denisovans and Neanderthals. Segments of Denisovan and Neanderthal DNA can be identified now in modern populations. But Neanderthals and Denisovans had around 104,000 base pairs in their genomes that are not found in modern humans. Researchers found that Neanderthals and Denisovans were missing some ancient DNA as well, suggesting these extinct species had lost significant portions of genetic code.

“Their results showed that our ancestors shed about 15.8 million base pairs of DNA before leaving Africa. As populations spread across Earth’s continents, they jettisoned additional chunks of DNA here and there. But certain populations have also been gaining DNA, mostly through duplication events where portions of the genetic code were accidentally copied and passed on,” reports Gizmodo.

While modern humans may presume that the shedding of DNA has honed us to the peak of evolutionary perfection, science can show that not all of our changes have been beneficial. In one example, research suggests that our hands are actually more primitive than those of our chimp ancestors, despite our adaptations for the use of tools.

This is the first time scientists have documented the loss (and gain) of large chunks of DNA in ancient populations. This genetic research may shed light on the enduring questions of how modern humans evolved and survived while other hominin died out.

Scientists still can only speculate as to what these results indicate, but as more research is done we can fill in the missing gaps of our understanding of the ancient story of humanity.

Source*

Related Topics:

The Hidden History of the Human Race*

DNA Editors Forget it, as Another Code is Discovered*

Powerful DNA ‘Editing’ Has Arrived*

DNA Changing to Three and Four Strands*

The Spirit of Sankara Resurges in Burkina Faso*

The Spirit of Sankara Resurges in Burkina Faso*

By Ann Garrison

In 1983, a military clique in Burkina Faso assassinated the anti-imperialist head of state Thomas Sankara, plunging the nation back into the clutches of U.S. and French neocolonialism. The people this year ousted the assassins and their presidential guard, in two mass rebellions.

“Anyone who thinks that the presidential guard would have attempted a coup d’état without the knowledge and complicity of the U.S. and France” is blind to the facts. – Dr. Gnaka La Goke

“The people of Burkina Faso took to the streets with signs reading “No Amnesty for Assassins.”

Burkina Faso’s Presidential Guard, a military elite created by longtime dictator Blaise Compaoré, seized power in mid September, but a popular uprising backed up by the Burkinabe army has reversed the coup and restored civilian rule – twice.

These events unfolded nearly eleven months after hundreds of thousands of Burkinabe filled the streets of the capital, set the Parliament Building on fire, and forced Blaise Compaoré to step down. Compaoré, who ruled Burkina Faso for 27 years, is infamous for organizing the assassination of the country’s revolutionary leader Thomas Sankara with the help of France and the French backed government of the Ivory Coast.

At least 10 citizens of Burkina Faso were killed and more than 100 were wounded when the country’s presidential guard fired on the uprising against the coup. In a decisive moment the Burkinabe army of 11,000 surrounded the capital and demanded that the elite presidential guard behind the coup disarm. This is how Paul Sankara, democracy activist and brother of the late Thomas Sankara, described that moment, on Pacifica’s WBAI AfrobeatRadio, 09.26.2015:

“Yeah, it was very patriotic, what they did. The story of Burkina Faso, when we read and we learn a little bit about how people do things in Burkina Faso, it’s not a surprise that Thomas Sankara was born in Burkina Faso, or that Thomas Sankara came from Burkina Faso.”

“The same thing happened in Burkina Faso in 1983.”

“Let me tell you something that many people may not see. When Thomas Sankara came to power on August 4, 1983, he was imprisoned after he resigned from his position of prime minister. The same thing that we saw today, the same thing happened in Burkina Faso in 1983. Those who wanted to go and free Thomas Sankara, they were being helped by the population. So this was not like a regular coup d’état. The military intervened after a popular uprising, after mass protest in Burkina Faso, people chanting and singing, ‘Free Thomas Sankara. Free Thomas Sankara.’  It was after the ‘Free Thomas Sankara’ protests that the military – most stood up – were going to be part of the process.”

After this year’s mid-September coup, negotiators from ECOWAS, the Economic Community of West African States, brokered a deal in which both the army and the presidential guard stood down until power had been formally restored to the transitional government on September 26, 2015.

French President Francois Hollande warned all parties in Burkina not to try and stop the ECOWAS mediation.  ECOWAS produced a draft proposal, which would have allowed the presidential guard to return to their previous armed authority, despite the attempted coup, and would have allowed the party of deposed dictator Blaise Compaoré to participate in upcoming elections. These elements of the agreement were very unpopular with the people of Burkina Faso, who took to the streets with signs reading “No Amnesty for Assassins” and told reporters that they had little use for ECOWAS. As soon as the transitional government was restored to power, it invoked African Union principle and the will of the Burkinabe people to disarm and disband the presidential guard and exclude coup plotters from the upcoming election.

U.S. and French Special Forces in Burkina Faso

Burkina Faso hosts both U.S. and French Special Forces and has served as an important military ally of both France and the United States in West Africa, under the guise of counterterrorism. Dr. Gnaka La Goke, an African History professor at Maryland’s Montgomery College, also speaking to WBAI AfrobeatRadio, said that anyone who thinks that the presidential guard would have attempted a coup d’état without the knowledge and complicity of the U.S. and France is refusing to see how things are done in the 21st century.

“If you want to talk about how things are, the different buildings in Burkina Faso, from the presidential palace, there’s the presidential guard, a military base, then the American Embassy. So this is one thing.”

“Second thing. Two weeks before the coup d’état, I heard that the State Department sent a warning to its citizens, telling them that if they go to Burkina Faso, they should be cautious, they should not go out at night, they should avoid some locations because something could happen in Burkina Faso. I was surprised. I said, ‘What is going to happen in Burkina Faso?’  So it means that everyone was watching, But at the same time in Ivory Coast, people were trying to take to the streets. A few people were already killed, but the State Department did not issue that warning.”

“And third, in February 2015, there was a military training of some officials, of African military officials, to fight against terrorism. Gilbert Diendéré was – I don’t know how they did it – but he was there representing Burkina Faso and training with the American military experts. That was February 2015. And then there are other sources that say that he has some close ties with the French secret service.”

“When they saw the mobilization of the people, then they decided to turn coat, as usual.”

“So, if somebody wants to tell me that Gilbert Diendéré just decided to do this on his own, or that Blaise Compaoré supported him, or that France and America did not have anything to do in that coup d’état, I think that the person is either expressing bad faith, or the person does not want to look at the reality, and the person does not want to see how things are done in this world of the 21st century.”

“So, based on everything that I just said, I believe that they knew that this was going to happen, and they thought that it was going to succeed. It was when they saw the mobilization of the people, then they decided to turn coat, as usual, or to change their position, to show to the world that they are on the side of democracy.”

The coup d’état in Burkina Faso appears to be the second U.S.-backed African coup to fail this year, after it became clear that there was too much popular will against it. The first was in Burundi in May.

Burkina’s National Army Disarms the Presidential Guard

On September 28:

The New York Times reported that the Burkinabe presidential guard, formally known as the Regiment of Presidential Security, or RSP, had refused to disarm. The Times quoted a transitional government statement that said, “This handful of die-hards has taken hostage not only members of the former RSP who wanted to rejoin the side of reason, but also officers of the national armed forces tasked with disarming them. But even more seriously, the government knows that they have called foreign forces and jihadist groups to their rescue to realize their dark scheme.”

September 29:

The BBC reported that Burkina’s national army had surrounded the presidential guard base, that gunfire had been heard, and that the Ouagadougou airport had been closed.

Reuters reported that the Burkinabe national army entered the presidential guard base and met little resistance, but that coup leader General Gilbert Diendéré had escaped to an undisclosed location.

September 30:

The Associated Press/ABC reported that coup leader Gilbert Diendéré had taken refuge in the Vatican Embassy.

October 1: 

The Voice of America reported that General Gilbert Diendéré had surrendered.

Bloomberg quoted reinstated interim president Michel Kafondo, who said “It was quite a feat but we’ve conquered the camp without casualties,”

Manganese, Gold, and the Mining Contracts Review

Burkina Faso’s richest resources are manganese and gold. Manganese is one of the most industrially essential ferrous metals and one of the few for which the United States is totally dependent on imports. It is a mineral with many applications in the manufacture of iron, steel, aluminum alloys, batteries and chemicals.

The U.S. government classifies manganese as a strategic and critical mineral because a steady supply is essential to weapons manufacture, steel manufacture, and an industrial economy.

In May 2014, five months before the Sankarist uprising that drove Blaise Compaoré from power, his government issued a permit to Pan African Minerals to mine Burkina’s Tambao manganese deposits, which are some of the world’s largest, for $1 billion.

In March 2015, five months after Burkinabe filled the streets and Blaise Campaoré fled, the transitional government ordered that work stop at the Tambao mine until they complete a review of how the permit was issued.  The government also said that it is reviewing all mining contracts awarded under Compaore’s 27-year rule.

Source*

Related Topics:

Sponsoring Terrorism in Burundi to Rebalkanize Resource-rich Great Lake’s Region*

U.S. Sponsors Rape in Congo*

Colonial France out for Niger’s Uranium*

The Rise of the French Right and the CFA Franc

French Grab for Mali’s Gold*

From Liberation to Re-enslavement

France’s Debt to Haiti Remains Despite Hollande’s and Martelly’s Attempt to Rewrite History*