Archive | June 22, 2017

3.5 Billion Unknowingly Poisoned By Airlines Each Year?*

3.5 Billion Unknowingly Poisoned By Airlines Each Year?*

By Sayer Ji

It’s been five months since our first investigative report about the serious health hazards associated with modern air travel: “Asbestos of the Sky” – The Aviation Industry’s Darkest Coverup.

I wish the title of the article were hyperbole, but it really is that dark, and the cover-up stretches over half a century, being no less devastating to public health than other agendas you may already be familiar with such as Big Tobacco’s Smoking-Cancer link and the CDC’s Vaccine-Autism coverup.

The proof is in how many people still know absolutely nothing about the devastating health risks of bleed-air being fed directly into the cabins of planes from their engines.

Thankfully, the tides are beginning to shift. There has been a flurry of global reporting on new research from Stirling University hosted on the WHO’s website that confirms there is a clear pattern of and chronic symptoms ranging from breathing and vision problems, to neurological ones like headaches and dizziness in those exposed to the air blown from engines into aircraft cabins.

The Daily Mail, reporting on the new study recently stated:

‘There is a clear cause-and-effect relationship linking health effects to a design feature that allows the aircraft air supply to become contaminated by engine oils and other fluids in normal flight.

‘This is a clear occupational and public health issue with direct flight-safety consequences.’

The Telegraph’s headline is even more to the point: “New health concerns – and cancer link – over toxic cabin air breathed by 3.5 billion passengers each year

If you or anyone you know flies, nothing could be more important than for you to know what you are being exposed to, and what can be done about it.  I am convinced that consumer pressure on the industry will be the critical factor in reforming the industry, and not top-down political pressure by lawmakers, which will come only much later.

The first positive sign is that Boeing has already developed a non-toxic alternative called the 787 Dreamliner which is the only plane that takes fresh air from outside instead of directly from compressors in the jet engines to supply the cabin. Unfortunately, at this time, it is only rarely used for domestic flights. But consumer education and subsequent demand can quickly correct that problem!

Please share this newsletter with friends, family, loved ones, and health practitioners. Together I know we can make a big difference!

Click here to view the report, “Asbestos of the Sky” – The Aviation Industry’s Darkest Coverup.

Source*

Related Topics:

CDC Gives Itself the Right to Test, Quarantine Travelers without Due Process, Informed Consent*

Los Alamos Study Finds Airport Scanners Alter DNA*

Climate Engineering and the Dangers of Air Travel*

 

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Moonlight and Nature’s Rhythms*

Moonlight and Nature’s Rhythms*

By Ferris Jabr

Lunar luster triggers mating orgies, guides travelers and even can even provoke magical transformations

One November night each year, beneath the full moon, more than 130 species of corals simultaneously spawn in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. Some corals spew plumes of sperm, smoldering like underwater volcanoes. Others produce eggs. But most release both eggs and sperm, packed together in round, buoyant bundles as small as peppercorns and blushed in shades of pink, orange, and yellow.

At first, the parcels wait in the lips of corals. Then, in stunning unison, numerous corals lose their seeds, which hover momentarily above their parents, preserving the shape of the reef in an effervescent echo. Gradually, the bundles drift skyward.

The first time marine biologist Oren Levy witnessed this phenomenon, in 2005, he was near Heron Island, off the east coast of Australia. Fish, marine worms, and various predatory invertebrates zipped through the water, feeding on the coral confetti, which rose slowly from the reef in huge quantities. “It’s like the whole ocean wakes up,” says Levy, who now heads a marine ecology research team at Bar Ilan University in Israel.

 “You can watch videos, you can hear about it, but once you are actually in the midst of the biggest orgy on this planet, there’s nothing else like it.”

Corals continue to reproduce in the Great Barrier Reef today, though the sections that have escaped the ravages of climate change are rapidly shrinking. Swimming near the surface of the sea that memorable night 12 years ago, Levy encountered dense pink mats of accumulating eggs and sperm. There, drenched in moonlight, gametes from different colonies began to fuse and form free-swimming larvae, which would eventually settle on the seafloor, bud, and construct new coral citadels—a process now more vital than ever.

The moon is not the only environmental cue the corals use to achieve sexual synchrony on such a massive scale; water temperature and day length also matter. Yet the moon’s presence seems to be crucial. If the sky is too cloudy, and the moon obscured, the corals will often not spawn. Sometimes they delay until the next full moon. In the course of their studies, Levy and his colleagues revealed that not only do corals have light-sensitive neurons tuned to the dim blue wavelengths of moonlight, they also have genes that change their activity level in sync with the waxing and waning moon, regulating reproduction.

Scientists have known for centuries that the moon alters Earth’s ecosystems through gravity. As it spins around our planet, warping space-time, the moon contributes to a complex contortion of the oceans, producing twin bulges we call the tides. In turn, the daily marriage and separation of land and sea transforms the topography of numerous species’ homes and the access they have to food, shelter, and each other.

The moon also stabilizes Earth’s climate. Earth does not have perfect posture; it is tilted along its polar axis, circling the sun at an angle of about 23 degrees. The moon acts as an anchor, preventing the Earth from varying its axial tilt by more than a degree or two. Without the moon, our planet would likely wobble about like a dreidel, tilting a full 10 degrees every 10,000 years, and possibly oscillating the global climate between ice ages and hellish heat the likes of which no species has ever endured.

What is becoming increasingly clear, however, is that the moon also influences life in a more surprising and subtle way: with its light. Most organisms possess an array of genetically encoded biological clocks that coordinate internal physiology and anticipate rhythmic changes in the environment. These clocks are wound by various environmental cues known as zeitgebers (time givers), such as light and temperature.

Sunlight is the best-studied zeitgeber, but it turns out that for many aquatic creatures, moonlight is just as crucial. In the past few years, scientists have rekindled a long-neglected curiosity about the moon’s power to manipulate life, reviving studies on biology’s secret moon clocks.

Source*

Related Topics:

‘Liberating’ the Moon of Its Natural Resources!

The Human Body Emits, Communicates with, and is Made from Light*

Behind the Hijri Calendar and the Year 1436 AH/2014 AD*

Heavenly Signs: A Celestial-Terrestial Drama in the Making

Layla-tul Qadr

Saudi Arabia Abandons Islamic Calendar as Part of Cost-Cutting Measures*

Sunset Light in the East!*

Science Lends Weight to the Bright Days

U.N. chief Calls for Protecting Civilians in Raqqa*

U.N. chief Calls for Protecting Civilians in Raqqa*

U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres called for protecting civilians at a time when the warplanes of the U.S.-led international coalition continue their massacres against innocent civilians there.

I make an urgent appeal to all those conducting military operations in Syria to do everything in their power to protect civilians and civilian infrastructure, he said in a statement Wednesday, adding that the inhabitants of Raqqa are facing critical situation.

The illegal U.S.-led coalition, under the pretext of fighting the ISIS terrorist organizations, targeted on June 8 the residential neighborhoods in Raqqa city with airstrikes using white phosphorous bombs, leaving scores of innocent civilians dead or injured.

In the statement, the U.N. chief voiced particular concern for the civilians in Raqqa as well as those stuck in other besieged and hard-to-reach areas, some of whom have been deprived of food and basic medical assistance for years on end.

The U.N. Commission of Inquiry on Syria expressed deep concern over the large number of victims who were killed in Raqqa.

Guterres also expressed concern over the latest developments in Syria after downing the Syrian jet by the international coalition in the countryside of Raqqa, warning against worsening the situation there.

Source*

Related Topics:

U.S. Aircraft Directly Transporting ISIS Fighters Out of Raqqa*

U.N. Reveals U.S. Massacred 300 Civilians in Raqqa Last Week*

Syrian Troops Move Closer to Raqqa as the U.S. Drops Chemical Weapons on the Citizens*

Israel Paying Syrian ‘Rebels’ to Protect Rothschild, Murdoch Oil*

Ron Paul: Why The Hell Are We Attacking Syrians Fighting ISIS?*

Australia Halts Airstrikes in Syria*

Russia Threatens to Target U.S.-Led Coalition Planes in Syria

What the Media Won’t Tell You about Syria*

Ramadhan at an Israeli Military Checkpoint*

Ramadhan at an Israeli Military Checkpoint*

Every year during Ramadhan, tens of thousands of Palestinians in the occupied West Bank take advantage of a temporary relaxation of Israeli movement restrictions in order to attend Friday prayers at al-Aqsa mosque in Jerusalem, which they are normally prevented from entering.

Israel uses the Qalandiya military checkpoint to control Palestinian movement between the West Bank cities of Ramallah and Jerusalem.

Men over the age of 40, children under 12 and women of all ages are allowed to cross Qalandiya checkpoint and enter Jerusalem without military permits on Fridays during the month of Ramadan only.

Video by Ahmad Al-Bazz/Activestills

Source*

Related Topics:

Ramadhan in Gaza*

Ramadhan amongst the Rubble of Gaza*

Ramadhan a Beacon of Light in Jerusalem*

Egypt’s Ramadhan Street Banquet: Free Iftar Brings Hope*

Muslims Ramadhan Waking may have saved Grenfell Tower Residents’ Lives*

Inner Dimensions of Ramadhan Fasting*

How Enslaved Muslims in the Americas fasted in Ramadhan*

Praying for the Sacred and World Peace*

Praying for the Sacred and World Peace*

Chief Arvol Looking Horse speaks of the sacred at Standing Rock in 2016

 

2017 World Peace and Prayer Day statement by the Keeper of the Sacred White Buffalo Calf Bundle

 

By Chief Arvol Looking Horse

At the age of 12 years old I was given the responsibility of taking care of the Sacred Chanupa. My journey as a holy person has led to many visions. World Peace and Prayer Day is a vision of healing for all life that was initiated 22 years ago today.

Today, World Peace and Prayer Day is at Mauna a Wakea (Mountain of Sky Father), also known as Mauna Kea, in Hawaii. Many First Nations Indigenous Peoples are gathering here to pray and make spiritual offerings for all life on Mother Earth. Also, people from all directions and all Nations across Turtle Island will be praying in unification with us today.

The messages from many animal nations have been shown for a long time now. If we do not create the consciousness for the need to unite all humanity at Mother Earth’s Sacred Sites; there will be chaos, disasters, and severe tragedies for all life. We are related to all things that have a spirit, and everything on Mother Earth has a spirit. We call this relationship we have with all life the ‘Mitakuye Oyasin.

Recently, the Sacred Sites in the territories of the Oceti Sakowin (Nations of the Seven Council Fires) have been encroached upon by the Dakota Access Pipeline. Water protectors from all directions took a stand against this encroachment; and the World took notice and supported the Indigenous Peoples whose human rights have been violated.

The Red Hand Society, who has been trained by our ancestors to protect Sacred Sites and respect the sacredness of life, was forced to leave the unceded territory of the Oceti Sakowin just as our ancestors were; and many of the water protectors are facing criminal charges for protecting life at Standing Rock. However, we will continue to follow the Woope (natural laws), which are the sacred teachings of humanity.

The man-made laws state that a burial must have tombstone; but these laws do not recognize the protection of our ancestor’s final resting place marked by Grandfather stone. The man-made laws say that you need to be an anthropologist to understand what defines a sacred site, but it is the elders with the Indigenous knowledge that should be given this respect. The man-made law says that our sacred objects, that we repatriate from shoe boxes stored in museum attics, are required to be stored in buildings; when it is our inherent right to have these objects in our hands for ceremonies. We have been forced to leave our homelands and denied access by man-mad laws, but the sacred sites are still there. Therefore, we will continue to follow the natural law and do everything we can to protect these sacred sites where our ancestors rest and where we gather food and medicine necessary for the health and welfare of loved ones as well as necessary for all life on Mother Earth.

We began our ceremony on June 18th at Halema’uma’u, near the home and volcanic crater of Pele. The elders are passing the torch to the youth and have discussed the empowerment of women, following your spiritual path, cultural teachings, protection of sacred sites, healing from historical trauma as well as many other spiritual teachings. It is time for all Peoples to unify, and we ask everyone across the World to join us for a unified prayer today and all Nations to declare this day as an international holiday.

Source*

Related Topics:

The Shift: The Age of Heart*

If NATO Wants Peace and Stability it Should Stay Home*

Solange and Esperanza Spalding Inspire ‘Hope’ at the Alternative Inauguration’s Peace Ball*

Eritrea: Where Muslims and Christians Live in Peace*

Those Who Love Peace…

The Mainspring of Inner Peace

The Peacewalker

A Powerfull Message on the Fall of Humanity from Keanu Reaves*

Woman Dies and Comes Back To Life with This Incredible Message for Humanity*

Knowledge of Life*

 

How Greece Became a Guinea Pig for a Cashless and Controlled Society*

How Greece Became a Guinea Pig for a Cashless and Controlled Society*

As Greece moves closer to becoming a cashless society, it is clear that the country’s attitude towards cash is reckless and dangerous. The supposed convenience of switching to a cash-free system comes with a great deal of risk, including needless overreach by the state.

By Michael Nevradakis

A man makes a transaction at an automated teller machine (ATM) of a Piraeus Bank branch in Athens, Greece. (AP/Yorgos Karahalis)

 

Day by day, we’re moving towards a brave new world where every transaction is tracked, every purchase is recorded, the habits and preferences of everyone noted and analyzed. What I am describing is the “cashless society,” where plastic and electronic money are king, while banknotes and coins are abolished.

“Progress” is, after all, deemed to be a great thing. In a recent discussion, I observed on an online message board regarding gentrification in my former neighborhood of residence in Queens, New York, the closure of yet another longtime local business was met by one user with a virtual shrug: “Who needs stores when you have Amazon?”

This last quote is, of course, indicative of the brick-and-mortar store, at least in its familiar form. In December 2016, Amazon launched a checkout-free convenience store in Seattle—largely free of employees, but also free of cash transactions, as purchases are automatically charged to one’s Amazon account. “Progress” is therefore cast as the abolition of currency, and the elimination of even more jobs, all in the name of technological progress and the “convenience” of saving a few minutes of waiting at the checkout counter.

Still insist on being old-fashioned and stuck behind the times, preferring to visit brick-and-mortar stores and paying in cash? You may very well be a terrorist! Pay for your coffee or your visit to an internet cafe with cash? Potential terrorist, according to the FBI. Indeed, insisting on paying with cash is, according to the United States Department of Homeland Security, “suspicious and weird.”

The European Union, ever a force for positive change and progress, also seems to agree. The non-elected European Commission’s “Inception Impact Assessment” warns that the anonymity of cash transactions facilitates “money laundering” and “terrorist financing activities.” This point of view is shared by such economists as the thoroughly discredited proponent of austerity Kenneth Rogoff, Lawrence Summer (a famed de-regulator, as well as eulogizer of the “godfather” of austerity Milton Friedman), and supposed anti-austerity crusader Joseph Stiglitz, who told fawning participants at the World Economic Forum in Davos earlier this year that the United States should do away with all currency.

Logically, of course, the next step is to punish law-abiding citizens for the actions of a very small criminal population and for the failures of law enforcement to curb such activities. The E.U. plans to accomplish this through the exploration of upper limits on cash payments, while it has already taken the step of abolishing the 500-euro banknote.

The International Monetary Fund (IMF), which day after day is busy “saving” economically suffering countries such as Greece, also happens to agree with this brave new worldview. In a working paper titled “The Macroeconomics of De-Cashing,” which the IMF claims does not necessarily represent its official views, the fund nevertheless provides a blueprint with which governments around the world could begin to phase out cash. This process would commence with “initial and largely uncontested steps” (such as the phasing out of large-denomination bills or the placement of upper limits on cash transactions). This process would then be furthered largely by the private sector, providing cashless payment options for people’s “convenience,” rather than risk popular objections to policy-led decashing. The IMF, which certainly has a sterling track record of sticking up for the poor and vulnerable in society, comforts us by saying that these policies should be implemented in ways that would augment “economic and social benefits.”

The IMF’s Greek experiment in austerity

These suggestions, which of course the IMF does not necessarily officially agree with, have already begun to be implemented to a significant extent in the IMF debt colony known officially as Greece, where the IMF has been implementing “socially fair and just” austerity policies since 2010, which have resulted, during this period, in a GDP decline of over 25%, unemployment levels exceeding 28%, repeated cuts to what are now poverty-level salaries and pensions, and a “brain drain” of over 500,000 people—largely young and university-educated—migrating out of Greece.

Protesters against new austerity measures hold a placard depicting Labour Minister George Katrougalos as the movie character Edward Scissorhands during a protest outside Zappeion Hall in Athens, Friday, Sept. 16, 2016. The placard reads in Greek”Katrougalos Scissorhands”.

Indeed, it could be said that Greece is being used as a guinea pig not just for a grand neoliberal experiment in both austerity, but de-cashing as well. The examples are many, and they have found fertile ground in a country whose populace remains shell-shocked by eight years of economic depression. A new law that came into effect on January 1 incentivizes going cashless by setting a minimum threshold of spending at least 10% of one’s income via credit, debit, or prepaid card in order to attain a somewhat higher tax-free threshold.

Beginning July 27, dozens of categories of businesses in Greece will be required to install aptly-acronymized “POS” (point-of-sale) card readers and to accept payments by card. Businesses are also required to post a notice, typically by the entrance or point of sale, stating whether card payments are accepted or not. Another new piece of legislation, in effect as of June 1, requires salaries to be paid via direct electronic transfers to bank accounts. Furthermore, cash transactions of over 500 euros have been outlawed.

In Greece, where in the eyes of the state citizens are guilty even if proven innocent, capital controls have been implemented preventing ATM cash withdrawals of over 840 euros every two weeks. These capital controls, in varying forms, have been in place for two years with no end in sight, choking small businesses that are already suffering.

Citizens have, at various times, been asked to collect every last receipt of their expenditures, in order to prove their income and expenses—otherwise, tax evasion is assumed, just as ownership of a car (even if purchased a decade or two ago) or an apartment (even if inherited) is considered proof of wealth and a “hidden income” that is not being declared. The “heroic” former Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis had previously proposed a cap of cash transactions at 50 or 70 euros on Greek islands that are popular tourist destinations, while also putting forth an asinine plan to hire tourists to work as “tax snitches,” reporting businesses that “evade taxes” by not providing receipts even for the smallest transactions.

All of these measures, of course, are for the Greeks’ own good and are in the best interest of the country and its economy, combating supposedly rampant “tax evasion” (while letting the biggest tax evaders off the hook), fighting the “black market” (over selling cheese pies without issuing a receipt, apparently), and of course, nipping “terrorism” in the bud.

As with the previous discussion I observed about Amazon being a satisfactory replacement for the endangered brick-and-mortar business, one learns a lot from observing everyday conversations amongst ordinary citizens. A recent conversation I personally overheard while paying a bill at a public utility revealed just how successful the initial and largely uncontested steps enacted in Greece have been.

In the line ahead of me, an elderly man announced that he was paying his water bill by debit card, “in order to build towards the tax-free threshold.” When it was suggested to him that the true purpose of encouraging cashless payments was to track every transaction, even for a stick of gum, and to transfer all money into the banking system, he and one other elderly gentleman threw a fit, claiming “there is no other way to combat tax evasion.”

The irony that they were paying by card to avoid taxation themselves was lost on them—as is the fact that the otherwise fiscally responsible Germany, whose government never misses an opportunity to lecture the “spendthrift” and “irresponsible” Greeks, has the largest black market in Europe (exceeding 100 billion euros annually), ranks first in Europe in financial fraud, is the eighth-largest tax haven worldwide, and one of the top tax-evading countries in Europe.

Also lost on these otherwise elderly gentlemen was a fact not included in the official propaganda campaign: Germans happen to love their cash, as evidenced by the fierce opposition that met a government plan to outlaw cash payments of 5,000 euros or more. In addition, about 80% of transactions in Germany are still conducted in cash. The German tabloid Bild went as far as to publish an op-ed titled “Hands off our cash” in response to the proposed measure.

Global powers jumping on cashless bandwagon

Nevertheless, a host of other countries across Europe and worldwide have shunned Germany’s example, instead siding with the IMF and Stiglitz. India, one of the most cash-reliant countries on earth, recently eliminated 86 percent of its currency practically overnight, with the claimed goal, of course, of targeting terrorism and the “black market.” The real objective of this secretly planned measure, however, was to starve the economy of cash and to drive citizens to electronic payments by default.

Indians stand in line to deposit discontinued notes in a bank in Jammu and Kashmir, India,, Dec. 30, 2016. India yanked most of its currency bills from circulation without warning on Nov. 8, delivering a jolt to the country’s high-performing economy and leaving countless citizens scrambling for cash. (AP/Channi Anand)

 

Iceland, a country that stands as an admirable example of standing up to the IMF-global banking cartel in terms of its response to the country’s financial meltdown of 2008, nevertheless has long embraced cashlessness. Practically all transactions, even the most minute, are conducted electronically, while “progressive” tourists extol the benefits of not being inconvenienced by the many seconds it would take to withdraw funds from an ATM or exchange currency upon arrival. Oddly enough, Iceland was already largely cashless prior to its financial collapse in 2008—proving that this move towards “progress” did nothing to prevent an economic meltdown or to stop its perpetrators: the very same banks being entrusted with nearly all of the money supply.

Other examples of cashlessness abound in Europe. Cash transactions in Sweden represent just 3% of the national economy, and most banks no longer hold banknotes. Similarly, many Norwegian banks no longer issue cash, while the country’s largest bank, DNB, has called upon the public to cease using cash. Denmark has announced a goal of eliminating banknotes by 2030. Belgium has introduced a 3,000-euro limit on cash transactions and 93% of transactions are cashless. In France, the respective percentage is 92%, and cash transactions have been limited to 1,000 euros, just as in Spain. Outside of Europe, cash is being eliminated even in countries such as Somalia and Kenya, while South Korea—itself no stranger to IMF intervention in its economy—has, similarly to Greece, implemented preferential tax policies for consumers who make payments using cards.

Aside from policy changes, practical everyday examples also exist in abundance. Just try to purchase an airline ticket with cash, for instance. It remains possible—but is also said to raise red flags. In many cases, renting an automobile or booking a hotel room with cash is simply not possible. The aforementioned Department of Homeland Security manual considers any payment with cash to be “suspicious behaviour”—as one clearly has something to hide if they do not wish to be tracked via electronic payment methods. Ownership of gold makes the list of suspicious activities as well.

Just as the irony of Germany being a largely cash-based society while pushing cashless policies in its Greek protectorate is lost on many Greeks, what is lost on seemingly almost everyone is this: something that is new doesn’t necessarily represent progress, nor does something different. Something that is seemingly easier, or more convenient, is not necessarily progress either. But for many, “technological progress,” just like “scientific innovation” in all its forms and without exception, has attained an aura of infallibility, revered with religious-like fervour.

People queue in front of a bank for an ATM as a man lies on the ground begging for change, in Athens. (AP/Thanassis Stavrakis)

 

Combating purported tax evasion is also treated with a religious-like fervour, even while ordinary citizens—such as the two aforementioned gentlemen in Greece—typically seek to minimize their outlays to the tax offices. Moreover, while such measures essentially enact a collective punishment regardless of guilt or innocence, corporations and oligarchs who utilize tax loopholes and offshore havens go unpunished and are wholly unaffected by a switch to a cashless economy in the supposed battle against tax evasion.

This is evident, for instance, in the case of “LuxLeaks,” which revealed the names of dozens of corporations benefiting from favorable tax rulings and tax avoidance schemes in Luxembourg, one of the original founding members of the E.U. European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, formerly the prime minister of Luxembourg, has faced repeated accusations of impeding E.U. investigations into corporate tax avoidance scandals during his 18-year term as prime minister. Juncker has defended Luxembourg’s tax arrangements as legal.

At the same time, Juncker has shown no qualms in criticizing Apple’s tax avoidance deal in Ireland as “illegal,” while having been accused himself of helping large multinationals such as Amazon and Pepsi avoid taxes. Moreover, he has openly claimed that Greece’s Ottoman roots are responsible for modern-day tax evasion in the country. He has not hesitated to unabashedly intervene in Greek electoral contests, calling on Greeks to avoid the “wrong outcome” in the January 2015 elections (where the supposedly anti-austerity SYRIZA, which has since proven to be boldly pro-austerity, were elected).

He also urged the Greek electorate to vote “yes” (in favour of more E.U,-proposed austerity) in the July 2015 referendum—where the overwhelming result in favour of “no” was itself overturned by SYRIZA within a matter of days. In the European Union today, if there’s something that can be counted on, it’s the blatant hypocrisy of its leaders. Nevertheless, proving that old habits of collaborationism die hard in Greece, the rector of the law school of the state-owned Aristotle University in Thessaloniki awarded Juncker with an honorary doctorate for his contribution to European political and legal values.

Cashless policies bode poorly for the future

Where does all this lead though? What does a cashless economy actually mean and why are global elites pushing so fervently for it? Consider the following: in a cashless economy without coins or banknotes, every transaction is tracked. Buying and spending habits are monitored, and it is not unheard of for credit card companies to cancel an individual’s credit or to lower their credit rating based on real or perceived risks ranging from shopping at discount stores to purchasing alcoholic beverages. Indeed, this is understood to be common practice. Other players are entering the game too: in late May, Google announced plans to track credit and debit card transactions.

Claudia Lombana, PayPal’s shopping specialist, stamps a guest’s passport as he visits the travel section of PayPal’s Cashless Utopia in New York (Victoria Will/AP)

 

More to the point though, a cashless economy doesn’t just mean that financial institutions, large corporations, or the state itself can monitor all transactions that are occurring. It also means that the entirety of the money supply—itself now existing only in “virtual” form—will belong to the banking system. Not one cent will exist outside of the banking system, as physical currency will simply not be in circulation. The banking system—and others—will be aware not just of every transaction, but will be in possession of all of our society’s money supply, and will even have the ability to receive a percentage of every transaction that is taking place.

So what happens if your spending habits or your choice of travel destinations raises “red flags”?

What happens if you run into hard times economically and miss a few payments?

What happens if you are deemed to be a political dissident or liability – perhaps an “enemy of the state”?

Freezing a bank account or confiscating funds from accounts can take place almost instantaneously. Users of eBay and PayPal, for instance, are quite aware of the ease with which PayPal can confiscate funds from a user’s account based simply on a claim filed against that individual.

Simply forgetting one’s password to an online account can set off an aggravating flurry of calls in order to prove that your money is your own—and that’s without considering the risks of phishing and of online databases being compromised. Many responsible credit card holders found that their credit cards were suddenly canceled in the aftermath of the “Great Recession” simply due to perceived risk. And if you happen to be an individual deemed to be “dangerous,” you can be effectively and easily frozen out of the economy.

Those thinking that the “cashless revolution” will also herald the return of old-style bartering and other communal economic schemes might also wish to reconsider that line of thinking. In the United States, for instance, bartering transactions are considered taxable by the Internal Revenue Service. As more and more economic activity of all sorts takes place online, the tax collector will have an easier time detecting such activity. Thinking of teaching your child to be responsible with finances? That too will have a cost, as even lemonade stands have been targeted for “operating without a permit.” It’s not far-fetched to imagine that particularly overzealous government authorities could also target such activity for “tax evasion.”

In Greece, while oligarchs get to shift their money to offshore tax havens without repercussion and former Finance Minister Gikas Hardouvelis has been acquitted for failure to submit a declaration of assets, where major television and radio stations operate with impunity without a valid license while no new players can enter the marketplace and where ordinary households and small businesses are literally being taxed to death, police in August 2016 arrested a father of three with an unemployed spouse for selling donuts without a license and fined him 5,000 euros. In another incident, an elderly man selling roasted chestnuts in Thessaloniki was surrounded by 15 police officers and arrested for operating without a license.

Amidst this blatant hypocrisy, governments and financial institutions love electronic money for another reason, aside from the sheer control that it affords them. Studies, including one conducted by the American Psychological Association, have shown that paying with plastic (or, by extension, other non-physical forms of payment) encourage greater spending, as the psychological sensation of a loss when making a payment is disconnected from the actual act of purchasing or conducting a transaction.

But ultimately, the elephant in the room is whether the banking system even should be entrusted with the entirety of the monetary supply. The past decade has seen the financial collapse of 2008, the crumbling of financial institutions such as Lehman Brothers in the United States and a continent-wide banking crisis in Europe, which was the true objective behind the “bailouts” of countries such as Greece—saving European and American banks exposed to “toxic” bonds from these nations. Italy’s banking system is currently teetering on dangerous ground, while the Greek banking system, already recapitalized three times since the onset of the country’s economic crisis, may need yet another taxpayer-funded recapitalization. Even the virtual elimination of cash in Iceland did not prevent the country’s banking meltdown in 2008.

Should we entrust the entirety of the money supply to these institutions?

What happens if the banking system experiences another systemic failure?

Who do you trust more: yourself or institutions that have proven to be wholly irresponsible and unaccountable in their actions? The answer to that question should help guide the debate as to whether society should go cashless.

Source*

Related Topics:

Greece Bans Cash*

IMF to Greece: Sorry We’ll Destroy You*

In the Move towards a Cashless Society India’s GDP Growth Slumps*

India’s Cashless Villages not Really There Yet, But the Nightmare Has Begun*

E.U. Desperate to Raises Taxes Starts Cashless Society Project November 2017*

Ban Cash to Help Central Banks stinks of Total Control – NWO’s Cashless Society*

You Pay more while Banks Profiteer in a Cashless Society…that’s the Convenience*

Hackers Use Dridex Malware To Steal Millions From U.K. Bank Accounts*

Hackers Steal $1bn from Banks*

Congress Want to make it Illegal to Hold cash, Bitcoin, or Other Assets outside of a Bank*

Cashless Society: Use Credit Cards at Your Peril*

Sweden: Money Laundering and Emptying your Account Easier in Cashless Society*

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U.N. Report Confirms the Obvious: Reveals 3 Nations Producing Most Refugees Were Targets of U.S. Intervention*

U.N. Report Confirms the Obvious: Reveals 3 Nations Producing Most Refugees Were Targets of U.S. Intervention*

A U.N. report has shown that more than 65 million people were forced to leave their home countries last year, becoming refugees due to deadly conflict. The top nations from which refugees fled have one thing in common, they were all targets of U.S. intervention.

By Whitney Webb

Afghan refugee Rasoul Nazari, 15, holds his 10-month-old nephew Imran after crossing the border between Hungary and Austria in Nickelsdorf, Austria. (AP/Muhammed Muheisen)

A United Nations report has shed light on the world’s burgeoning crisis of displaced peoples, finding that a record 65.6 million were forced to vacate their homes in 2016 alone. More than half of them were minors.

The Office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), which drafted the report, put the figure into perspective, stating that increasing conflict and persecution worldwide have led to “one person being displaced every three seconds – less than the time it takes to read this sentence.”

U.N. High Commissioner Filippo Grandi called the figure “unacceptable” and called for “solidarity and a common purpose in preventing and resolving the crisis.”

However, what the U.N. report failed to mention was the role of U.S. foreign intervention, indirect or direct, in fomenting the conflicts responsible for producing most of the world’s refugees.

According to the report, three of the nations producing the highest number of refugees are Syria (12 million refugees created in 2016), Afghanistan (4.7 million) and Iraq (4.2 million).

The conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan are known to be the direct result of U.S. military invasions in the early 2000s, as well as the U.S.’ ongoing occupation of those nations. Decades after invading both countries, the U.S.’ destabilizing military presence in Iraq and Afghanistan has continued to increase in recent years, with the Trump administration most recently announcing plans to send thousands of soldiers to Afghanistan in the coming months. It is worth noting that each U.S. soldier in Afghanistan costs U.S. taxpayers $2.1 million.

While the U.S. has yet to directly invade Syria, the U.S. role in the conflict is clear and Syria’s destabilization and the overthrow of its current regime have long been planned by the U.S. government. The U.S. and its allies, particularly Israel and Saudi Arabia, have consistently funded “rebel” groups that have not only perpetuated the Syrian conflict for six long years, but have also committed atrocity after atrocity targeting civilians in Syrian cities, towns, and communities – a major factor in convincing Syrians to leave their homes.

The report ranks Colombia as the world’s second-largest producer of refugees, with 7.7 million Colombians displaced in 2016. Like Syria, the U.S. has not directly invaded Colombia, but is known to have extensively funded paramilitary groups, also known as “death squads,” in the country since the 1980s, when then-U.S. President Ronald Reagan declared a “war on drugs” in Colombia.

U.S. efforts have long helped fuel the civil war between the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and pro-government, U.S.-funded paramilitary groups. This conflict has lasted for more than half a century.

In 2000, then-President Bill Clinton’s administration funded the disastrous “Plan Colombia” with $4 billion in U.S. taxpayer funds, ostensibly to fight drug trafficking and insurgents. Almost all of this money was used to fund the Colombian military and its weapon purchases. “Plan Colombia” ultimately intensified armed violence, military deployments, human rights abuses by the Colombian military, and – of course – the internal displacement of Colombians. The legacy of U.S. policy in Colombia and its continuing support of the nation’s right-wing, neo-liberal regime have ensured that the chaos continues into the present.

Clinton ran on Plan Colombia and its sponsoring right wing death squads. https://t.co/yoE56yQLzP

— Tailfoot McWalshy (@BuglegsMcWalshy) March 10, 2017

In addition to the above, U.S foreign policy is also to blame for the conflict in South Sudan, where the UN report found was home to the fastest-growing displacement of people in the world. In 2011, the U.S. pushed South Sudan to secede from Sudan, as South Sudan holds the vast majority of Sudan’s oil reserves — the largest oil reserves in all of Africa. The U.S.’ push for the creation of an independent South Sudan dislodged Chinese claims to Sudanese oil, as the Chinese had previously signed oil contracts with the (now Northern) Sudanese government.

But when nation-building efforts went awry and civil war broke out just two years later, some analysts suggested that the conflict only started when South Sudan’s president began to cozy up to China. According to the UN report, approximately 3.3 million people in South Sudan have fled their homes since the war began.

Grandi has called on the world’s nations to help prevent and resolve the global refugee crisis. But he would also do well to point out the common cause uniting many of the world’s worst conflicts – the U.S. military-industrial complex’s insatiable lust for conquest, power and profit.

Source*

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