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The Science of Melanin*

The Science of Melanin*

By Dr. Karl Maret

 

Related Topics:

The Self Control Gland and Fasting

The Human Body Emits, Communicates with, and is Made from Light*

Does Skin Pigment Act Like A Natural Solar-Panel?*

The Self Control Gland and Why It Matters

Once Only Blacks Were Enslaved, Now We All Are*

Heavenly Signs: The Soul of Our Sun

Schoolgirl Found Hanged after Developing Allergic Reaction to School Wi-Fi*

Conscientious Scientists Make an Int’l Appeal on the Wide-scale Problem of Wi-fi*

He Survived Hiroshima and Nagasaki*

The Children of Tomorrow*

The Children of Tomorrow*

In this episode of AAE tv, Ethann is joined by Multi-Dimensional Psychologist, Mary Rodwell. Ethann and Mary discuss the very advanced children being born into the world today, what they have to teach us, and how best we can support them in their life journey.

Mary shares specific stories of gifted children she’s interviewed, and what she learned from them. She further delves into the significance of autism, aspergers and other similar conditions, and explains that these are symptoms of a new more advanced race of humans who are having difficulty adjusting to the 3 dimensional world. Other topics discussed, include light language, what purpose it serves, and what role spoken language plays among more advanced telepathic extraterrestrial races.

About Mary Rodwell

Mary Rodwell is recognised internationally as one of Australia’s leading researchers and writers in the UFO and contact phenomenon areas. Mary is the author of the highly acclaimed book ‘Awakening: How Extraterrestrial Contact Can Transform Your Life’ (2002); and producer of EBE award winning documentaries:- Expressions of ET Contact: A Visual Blueprint? (2000), and Expressions of ET Contact: A Communication and Healing Blueprint? (2004). Her new book ‘The New Human’ which describes and documents star children is due to be released in late 2016.

Mary is the Founder and Principal of Australian Close Encounter Resource Network (ACERN) which was established in 1997 to provide professional counselling, support, hypnotherapy and information to individuals and their families with ‘anomalous’ paranormal experiences and abduction-­‐contact experiences. Mary is also Director and Chair of the Experiencer Support Programs of Dr Edgar Mitchell: Foundation for Research into Extra-­‐terrestrial Encounters (FREE); and an advisory Committee member of Exopolitics (www.etworldpeace.com). Mary also organised the inaugural ‘Hidden Truths’ international conference held in Perth, Western Australia in 2003.

Mary has researched more than 3000 cases and suggests extraterrestrial encounters are a global phenomenon and this is evident in the new humans referred to as star children. Mary affirms that star children exhibit a maturity and wisdom beyond their years and have an awareness and connection to spiritual realms. ‘Indigo’s’ or ‘crystal’ children as they are also known have telepathic abilities, are spiritually awakened, and can describe many species of non-­‐human visitors with a feeling that they are as real to them as their ‘real’ family because they feel supported by them.

Mary Rodwell’s Website

Source*

Related Topics:

The Psychiatric Agenda Destroys Creative Children*

Tribal Parenting – How to Heal Our Children*

Bringing Adventure, Nature and Imagination Back into Children’s Play Time*

Music Training Speeds Up Brain Development in Children*

Palestinian Children Message to the World*

PhD Teacher Quits: “The Disorder is in the System, not the Children”*

The Scientific Management of Children*

U.K. Setting Children up for Failure*

The Never-ending Feminist War on Children*

Raising Children Off-Grid*

Dear Future Generations: Sorry

Kids Don’t Know They’re being Led into New Forms of Mental Concentration Camps*

 

Foster Father Called a ‘Hero’ Because He Only Takes In Terminally-Ill Children*

Foster Father Called a ‘Hero’ Because He Only Takes In Terminally-Ill Children*

By Brianna Acuesta

This foster dad hasn’t had a day off since 2010

Mohamed Bzeek, Credit: Erika Aguilar

 

When it comes to fostering children, it’s already a rough process because of the unstable home life the children have and the constant change in parents. For the parents, it can be difficult assimilating the child to their new environment, rules, and schedule, let alone providing the emotional support that’s necessary for children that may have been through trauma.

For one foster parent in Los Angeles, Mohamed Bzeek, there are added challenges because of the types of foster children he takes in; he only accepts terminally-ill children that have exhausted their options because no other foster parents are willing to put in the time for these dying children. It’s understandable because the emotional strength that’s needed to deal with the constant sickness and eventual death are something that virtually no one can handle on their own, but Bzeek takes on the challenge with his huge heart.

“You have to do it from your heart, really. If you do it for money, you’re not going to stay for long,” Bzeek told PBS.

Credit: Children’s Hospital

Bzeek has said that it’s his Muslim faith that has kept him going all these years but that his late wife, Dawn, is who inspired him to open their heart and their home to these special needs children. She became a foster parent before they married and was involved in toy drives and other activities to help the foster kids in Los Angeles county. It wasn’t until she fell ill herself a few years ago that she found herself frustrated and unable to care for herself or the children. She died in 2014 but Mohamed has kept their dream of helping abandoned children going.

Mohamed currently cares for a 6-year-old with a rare brain defect called encephalocele, which caused her to be born with a small head and for some of her brain to be exposed as it protruded from her skull. Doctors removed the brain matter and she was removed from her biological parents’ care at just 7 weeks old, at which point Bzeek took her in. She cannot hear or see and only responds to touch; she also experiences daily seizures and her arms and legs are paralyzed. He also cares for Adam, his own 19-year-old special needs child who was born with brittle bones and dwarfism.

The 62-year-old foster dad has buried 10 of the foster children he has taken in and he says each death is difficult but inevitable. The baby that he and Dawn took in at the beginning of their time together died when she was just one-year-old as a result of a spinal disorder she developed because her mother breathed in too many pesticides during her pregnancy. He has cared for several children with similar brain defects as his current foster daughter, and he says this condition is a life sentence.

The key is, you have to love them like your own. I know they are sick. I know they are going to die. I do my best as a human being and leave the rest to God,” he said in an interview with the LA Times.

Near the end of last year, Bzeek discovered that he had colon cancer and needed surgery to remove tumors the following month. It was tough for Bzeek because he employs a nurse to care for the children while he works during the day and when he comes home he is constantly caring for his children. He says he hasn’t had a day off since 2010 and had no time to have the surgery and undergo the care afterwards, but he had to make arrangements and the surgery wound up being successful. Throughout the whole process, he didn’t have anyone to lean on for support.

Credit: Erika Aguilar

“I felt about the kids who’s been sick for all their life. If I am adult, 62 years old, and I feel this, that I am alone, I am scared, nobody tells me it’s okay and it will be fine, this experience, this humbled me,” he told PBS.

After reading about his story in the LA Times, one good samaritan reached out to Bzeek and wanted to help anyway that she can. She started a GoFundMe page for him so that he could improve his home for his children and hire a second nurse for whenever he needs a break and the fund has skyrocketed since then. As of this publishing, the fund has reached nearly $500,000.

On the page, Margaret Cotts, the one who started the page, lists the things that Mohamed would like to use the money for. This includes fixing the roof, which has been extremely leaky for some time, getting central heating and air because his daughter’s brain doesn’t allow her body to regulate her temperature, buy a new wheelchair-accessible van because his current one is 14 years old, and pay for his son’s college education. If you would like to donate to the GoFundMe page to support Mohamed, you can do so here.

Source*

Related Topics:

Court Rules Baby Must Die, Even Though Parents Can Pay Out of Pocket*

Lawsuit Exposes State in Taking Kids from Parents and Heavily Drugging them with Psychotropics*

Parents Told Five Times to Abort Boy with ‘no brain’ – Now He’s a Thriving 4-year-old*

Toddler Permanently Brain Damaged by a Mystery Combination Vaccination That Her Parent’s Did Not Consent To*

Tribal Parenting – How to Heal Our Children*

Child Rapist Tied Up and Beaten To Death by Women in India*

The Psychiatric Agenda Destroys Creative Children*

 

How Muslims and Hindus of Tando Adam came together in Ramadhan*

How Muslims and Hindus of Tando Adam came together in Ramadhan*

By Manoj Genani (photo credit)

Fasting through the month of June, Pakistanis across the nation had to deal with a scorching summer, while trying to abstain from all the delicacies they would later enjoy on Eid. Even though the majority of the month went by without incident, the last few days of Ramadhan proved a grim prelude to what should be a festive period.

It is no secret that certain elements in Pakistan want to divide Pakistanis based on their caste and creed through spreading fear and vitriol. However, locals in the small city of Tando Adam proved that despite a difference in their beliefs, consideration and understanding of each others cultures and traditions is what Pakistan needs to exist as a diverse society.

Coming together for Iftar, the Hindu and Muslim communities of Tando Adam showed that they can coexist in a multicultural city. The Hindu Panchayat hosted an evening vegetarian Iftar party and distributed Eid gifts and goods to 350 impoverished families.

A young man lays the table for the guests for the evening’s diverse Iftar party

 

The vegetarian menu included plenty of fruits.

 

Hindus and Muslims join hands in a collective prayer towards unity and religious harmony

 

Hindu religious leader Raju Baba feeding his Muslim compatriot after hearing the Adhan

 

“This is our home. We are one, we have to respect each other and take care of each other’s beliefs & values,” claimed Raju Baba, a leader of the Hindu community, adding that they have been living this way for centuries, with “peace and pluralism.”

Before the Iftar party women of all ages from low income households gathered to collect Eid gifts being distributed by the Hindu Panchayat and Odero Lal Welfare Organisation. Unable to afford Eid supplies on their own, the women walked away content with food, clothes and shoes for themselves and the family.

Women sat patiently as they waited for the distribution of Eid supplies

 

Women of all ages showed up to the distribution ceremony

 

Some ladies were grateful as they hadn’t been Eid shopping for a couple of years due to low wages or unemployment.

Elderly women who would normally have to work extra hours to afford the gifts were particularly content.

 

Women were able to walk away, knowing that they would be able to celebrate a colourful Eid

 

The local Hindu community gathered these gifts, fearing that low income families would be unable to celebrate Eid like the rest of the nation.

“We collected funds from the Hindu Panchayat and delivered Eid gifts to impoverished Muslim families,” said Dileep Kumar Kohistani, an organiser of the Iftar party.

Ghulam Nabi Nizamani from the Social Welfare Department was of the view that religious issues were at a low in Sindh and people were reluctant of these kind of activities due to extremism in Pakistan. However, the reemergence of such events is key for the revival of religious harmony.

At the end of the day the communities were lauded for their efforts of showing a peaceful and harmonious, multicultural society

Source*

Related Topics:

Iraqis Travel to Mosul to Celebrate Eid in a Show of Solidarity*

I’m a Pakistani Hindu. So what Business do I have Missing Eid?

Muslims Across the World Celebrate Eid Al-Fitr*

Jeremy Corbyn Praises Muslim Heroes of Grenfell Tower fire in Eid Message*

Syria’s More Confident Assad gives Eid Prayers in Hama*

These 5 People don’t Spend Eid with their Families to make the Occasion Happier for Us*

God-consciousness After Ramadhan

Yoga and Meditation literally “repair” your DNA to Eliminate Disease and Depression*

Yoga and Meditation literally “repair” your DNA to Eliminate Disease and Depression*

By Vicki Batts

Balancing activities like Tai Chi, yoga and meditation are touted for their ability to promote a sense of well-being and reduce stress, but is there more to it than meets the eye? While these exercises are known for being great ways to relax, new research has shown that their benefits extend far past the ephemeral. The relief mind-body interventions can offer isn’t just mental; in fact, these activities can actually bring about physical changes at the molecular level.

A recent study led by scientists from Coventry University and Radboud University have shown that mind-body interventions can turn back molecular reactions within your DNA that cause disease and depression.

The study’s lead researcher Ivana Buric, from the Brain, Belief and Behaviour Lab in Coventry University’s Centre for Psychology, Behaviour and Achievement, commented,

“These activities are leaving what we call a molecular signature in our cells, which reverses the effect that stress or anxiety would have on the body by changing how our genes are expressed. Put simply, MBIs [mind-body interventions] cause the brain to steer our DNA processes along a path which improves our wellbeing.”

Buric also noted that millions of people are already reaping the benefits of mind-body exercises like yoga and Tai Chi, without even realizing how truly beneficial these activities are for their bodies. Buric states that while more studies still need to be done to fully ascertain the scope of what mind-body intervention can do, she believes that their research is a key building block for future research efforts.

Published in the journal Frontiers in Immunology, their study analyzes more than a decades’ worth of research on how mind-body intervention strategies can impact the behavior of DNA. Genetic expression was a focal point of the team’s research, because the way genes are activated to produce proteins can have a system-wide impact. The biological composition of the brain, body and immune system can all be affected by the way genetic proteins are expressed.

In total, the team reviewed 18 studies with a combined 846 participants. The experts determined that when looked at as a whole, the 11 years of data “reveal a pattern in the molecular changes which happen to the body as a result of MBIS [mind-body interventions], and how those changes benefit our mental and physical health.”

It’s known that when a person undergoes a stressful event, their body goes into what’s often known as the “flight or fight” response. This process also triggers the production of a molecule that regulates gene expression, known as nuclear factor kappa B, or NF-kB.

“NF-kB translates stress by activating genes to produce proteins called cytokines that cause inflammation at cellular level,” as Science Daily explains.

While this reaction is useful temporarily, when it is consistent over time, it can be quite damaging and increase the risk of diseases like cancer and disorders like depression. It can even accelerate the aging process.

However, the research team found that people who practice mind-body interventions on a regular basis showcase a reduction in the production of NF-kB and related cytokines. In turn, this leads to a decrease and reversal of pro-inflammatory gene expression. Ultimately, this lowers the risk of inflammation-related conditions.

Past research on meditation and other similar activities has also indicated that these exercises can have far-reaching effects on the brain and body. For example, recent research has shown that meditation can help keep your brain youthful and on average, reduce “brain age” by over seven years.  Earlier this year, a research team from Harvard University also found that yoga can elicit positive changes in metabolic function.

These mind-body activities are clearly a force to be reckoned with.

Source*

Related Topics:

NWO’s Version of Yoga Stirring up a Frenzy*

Yoga, Race and ‘Colour Blindness’*

How Art Can Heal Mental Illness*

The Ancient Power of Chanting (Mantra) Validated by Modern Science*

Nepal’s Military Set to Use Transcendental Meditation to Relieve Global Collective Stress and Stop War*

Meditation Does More for You Than Keep You Calm!

The Brain Connection: Prayer and Meditation

RFID Monitoring and DNA Profiles Unite*

Meet the Hidden Second Layer of Information in Your DNA*

Le Moulinet: Indigenous French Muslims

Le Moulinet:  Indigenous French Muslims

The amazing, first-time visual documentation of a handful of French families living in seclusion in secular France, after having converted to Shi’a Islam

 

Related Topics:

Russia and Islam*

Anti-Islam Marches in U.S. Fail to Draw Participants*

New Jersey Town Settles Religious Discrimination Lawsuit With Islamic Group for $3.25mn*

Austrian President calls on All Women to Wear Hijab in Solidarity with Muslims against Islamophobia*

Islam and Martial Arts: China’s Hui Muslim Tradition*

Islamists Attack Christmas, But Europeans Abolish It*

Islamic Spirituality and the Needs of Humanity Today*

A Video Game about the Mathematical Beauty of Islamic Art*

Islamic Culture before Western Meddling*

Ottomans saved Hungarian PM’s Ancestors; but Denies Islam was Part of Europe*

Wahhabism on Trial? How Islam is challenging Al Saud’s Custodianship of Mecca*

The Relentless Jewish Campaign against Islam*

Top 10 Ways Islamic Law Forbids Terrorism*

Post-Ramadhan Renewal: 5 Lessons to Live By

Post-Ramadhan Renewal: 5 Lessons to Live By

 

Related Topics:

The Centre of Consciousness is One’s Heart*

Prophet Muhammed (SAW) on Ramadhan

The Inner Technology of Islam

God-consciousness After Ramadhan

Night Prayer and the Human Body Clock

Arguing God from Being?

Atheists, Whatever They Say to the Contrary, Really Do Believe in God*

The Student and the Atheist Professor

The aql is not Reason – it’s Consciousness*

Rumi on Trusting Yourself*

Ramadhan Reflections: Memorizing the Qur’an is Not Enough

Courage to Create Good in the World*

Trauma Has Trickled Down for Generations*

Trauma Has Trickled Down for Generations*

How symptoms of mental illness manifest in Black women, and the steps you can take toward healing.

By Angela Fichter

The shooting death of Charleena Lyles, a 30-year-old pregnant mother of four, by Seattle police has brought anger and criticism yet again of the way police engage African Americans. The Seattle Police Department’s history of using excessive force and employing discriminatory practices against Black Seattleites prompted the 2011 U.S. Justice Department investigation into the SPD’s conduct, resulting in court-ordered reforms. In 2015, the SPD began training officers in crisis intervention for people with behavioral problems, but a pattern of criminalizing Black people persists.

Lyles called 911 on June 18 to report a break-in. Police say officers killed her because she had confronted them with a knife. The Lyles family says she was battling a recently discovered mental illness.

That doesn’t surprise Jennifer Henderson, a Seattle-based licensed mental health counselor with a special focus on Black mental health.

In 1925, Fred Goree, a brick mason and manager in the Negro Baseball League, was killed in St. Louis by White policemen on his way to a baseball game. Goree, who was 33 years old, was stopped in his brand-new Buick for allegedly speeding. When he protested for being unjustly targeted, he was beaten to death on a public street, shot twice, and left in a ditch. Black and White witnesses provided conflicting statements, and the officers were never convicted. He was the primary breadwinner for his family, which included his wife, three children, his mother, and 13 siblings.

Henderson is Goree’s granddaughter. Though she never knew her grandfather, she’s felt the impact of trauma throughout her personal life, including through her mother, whom she described as “guarded, emotionally cold, and disconnected at times.”

Henderson explains how trauma disproportionately impacts Black women and the steps they can take to heal.

Angela Fichter: How does trauma uniquely impact Black women?

Jenny Henderson: Black women start with a level of trauma that we’ve inherited genetically. The trickle-down effect of slavery, discrimination and oppression, in addition to the ongoing trauma we experience in our neighborhoods, including police brutality, has a compound effect.

Our basic family structure has been undermined over the years because our men have been removed from the family. [They’re] incarcerated at larger numbers for longer periods of time, often due to no behavior or fault of their own. That leaves many of us without the financial or emotional support we might otherwise have.

Fichter: How do symptoms of mental illness manifest in Black women?

Henderson: We definitely see symptoms of PTSD [post-traumatic stress disorder] and a heightened state of anxiety, tension, and fear … explosive anger with little or no provocation. It can be what you call hyper-vigilance, where a person is very much aware, or even frightened, of the environment, constantly [questioning] if there’s a dangerous situation to be aware of.

How many times have we seen an angry mom, throwing her kids around, cursing at them? This could likely be related to racial trauma they’ve [personally] experienced—racism in the workplace and out in the world.

Fichter: What about the “angry Black woman” stereotype?

Henderson: And why is she so angry? She’s angry because oftentimes she’s been traumatized firsthand, within the family, and through intergenerational trauma [trauma passed down through generations]. She may have been treated aggressively by the police, or is facing domestic violence or sexual abuse. So, naturally her ability to regulate her emotions is going to be drastically decreased. You see mood swings and angry, defensive behavior.

Women tend to internalize emotions and are more likely to be depressed in the way the trauma or dysfunction manifests; but with males, they tend to outwardly express emotion in a way that is socially acceptable for them, which is anger.

Fichter: How has repeated exposure to trauma impacted intimacy within Black communities?

Henderson: It comes back to trust—the ability to have faith in another person, to be open, and allow oneself to be vulnerable in sharing love, communicating emotion, and being completely transparent and honest.

Oftentimes, Black women do not have a partner at all, and when they do, there’s baggage because of the experiences of being slighted, missed opportunities, and having to go above and beyond just to be considered good enough. All of that impacts our relationships. It adds a heaviness to our heart that causes difficulty interacting with one another in a positive, loving, peaceful way.

Fichter: What are ways young Black girls can address self-care before an emotional or mental state spirals out of control?

Henderson: Prevention. Mentoring is incredibly important, and I don’t think it should wait until there’s a problem. There are groups and agencies, but many very seldom recruit or maintain mentors of color, and mentors [have to] have a sense of what these kids go through in life—what would motivate and inspire them, and what things to be cautious of during the mentoring process.

[My] son had a White mentor, who built a large high-powered motor toy gun, painted it grey, then took him out in public to shoot Nerf pellets at various targets.

That could have ended up tragically, just like Tamir Rice. These mentors need some training on those appropriate interactions. But with that education, mentoring can be an incredibly powerful tool to guide people in the right direction when they need it.

[In addition to community stigma, Henderson acknowledges the history of racism in the medical and health fields that has prevented many African Americans from seeking mental health care. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, which monitors mental health service utilization among patients over 18, only around 8.6% of Black Americans used services, compared to 17.1% of Whites, between 2008 and 2012.

Black psychologists make up less than 6 percent of the nation’s practicing psychologists, but are growing in number, and most of them are women. Younger generations of African Americans are beginning to change their attitudes toward addressing mental health, and Henderson is starting to see younger patients.]

Fichter: What are your top three tips for Black women and girls struggling with their emotions and mental health?

Henderson: First and foremost, she should do everything within her power to learn about the greatness we come from, and the history of accomplishments excluded from our history books. [She must know] she comes from greatness and is capable and able to achieve greatness.

Reach out for help to everybody she can possibly think of: teachers, mentors, tutors, counselors at school, other women, and mental health agencies. Ask for what she needs, and if she doesn’t know what that is, she can still reach out and say,

“I need something, but I don’t know what it is. Can you help me figure it out?

I feel like I’m not enough, can do better, like I can be happier, and I don’t know how to do it.”

If she reaches out to somebody who can’t or doesn’t want to help, she shouldn’t stop there, but continue until she finds that support.

Trust your intuition. Learn how to tune in, listen, and follow it. Consistently, without exception, it will guide us toward what’s best and right for us, and toward opportunities that are better. Sometimes we need to leave where we are and listen to our intuition to know where we need to go.

Source*

Related Topics:

For Native Mothers, a Way to Give Birth That Overcomes Trauma*

Trauma and the Lineage of Illness*

Healing your Creativity after Trauma*

Trauma: Scholars Need to Be Real About the Issues We Face

An Indigenous Australian Approach to Healing Trauma*

CPS Case against Texas Homeschool Family Dismissed but Children are Traumatized*

The Cabal Exploits Filipino Trauma with unneeded Polio Vaccines*

The New Imperial Roman Empire*

Black Women Targeted with Eugenics Drug*

Black Community Unites to Protect D.C. After Girls Go Missing*

Six Countries that Grew Filthy Rich from Enslaving Black People*

Black Woman in Evening Gown Faces Police in Baton Rouge*

Nixon Advisor Admitted War on Drugs Invented to Crush Anti-War and Black Movements*

Black NYPD Officers Sue the Department, Were Pressured to Meet Quotas of Black Arrests*

Serena Williams To #BlackLivesMatter ‘Keep It Up’*

Meet the Indian Women Trying to Take Down the Caste System*