Tag Archive | Afghanistan

All-girl Robotics Team from Afghanistan Banned from Entering U.S, But Their Robot Will Enter*

All-girl Robotics Team from Afghanistan Banned from Entering U.S, But Their Robot Will Enter*

By Amando Flavio

Six teenage girls from Afghanistan have been left disappointed after the U.S. embassy denied them visas to travel to the first-ever international robotics competition for high school students from across the world, known as the First Global Challenge, due to be held in Washington, D.C. this month.

Although the girls were denied visas, their robot would be allowed to be sent to compete in the event. Graduate students from Carnegie Mellon University, Pennsylvania, helped the students to program their robot.

According to local media reports, the six girls twice trekked around 500 miles from Herat, a western city in Afghanistan, to the American embassy in Kabul to apply for the one-week travel visas. But after a series of interviews, their applications were rejected by U.S. officials. The aspiring inventors reportedly wept when they heard they couldn’t escort their machine to Washington.

Roya Mahboob, Afghanistan’s first female technology boss, confirmed that the girls have been crying all day since their applications were rejected. She said the decision to deny the girls entry into the U.S. for the competition has demoralized the spirit of the teenagers. The girls are now left with no choice than to appear at the event via video link from Herat, she added.

One of the disappointed girls, Fatemah, told Forbes:

“We want to show the world we can do it, we just need a chance.”

When news broke concerning the plight of the girls, some observers in the U.S. took to Twitter to register their displeasure.

I feel safer now that we’ve denied a once in a lifetime opportunity to a group of girls whose country we’ve been bombing since their birth. https://t.co/55bR2pFBPq

— Jonathan Blanks (@BlanksSlate) June 30, 2017

Also, former vice president of communications for Verizon, Anthony Citrano called the decision “infuriating”. Most of these concerns were triggered due to the fact that the Afghanistan team was all-girl. Observers believe their presence at the competition would have encouraged more Afghanistan girls to venture into science, mathematics, engineering and technology related courses.

Apart from the girls from Afghanistan, other students from Gambia, a small nation in West Africa were also denied visas for the event. However, students from Iran, Iraq, and Sudan were granted visas. These three countries are among the Muslim-majority countries Donald Trump imposed travel ban on.

Source*

Afghan girls allowed to fly to U.S. for robotics competition after Trump intervention

Six Afghan girls have received U.S. visas and are set to fly to Washington after President Donald Trump intervened to allow them into the United States for an international robotics competition.

The all-girl team picked up their visas at the U.S. Embassy in Kabul on July 13. The team was set to board a plane at Kabul International Airport within hours.

“We are so happy since we have been informed that we were accepted,” 16-year-old team member Lida Azizi said. “From the students to the teachers, we are all so very happy.”…

Related Topics:

Supreme Court Reinstates anti-Muslim Travel Ban*

Teens with No Engineering Experience Invent Solar Tent for Homeless, Win Grant from MIT*

No Force on Earth can Compete with NATO and U.S.’ Drug Trafficking Business in Afghanistan*

U.N. Report Confirms the Obvious: Reveals 3 Nations Producing Most Refugees Were Targets of U.S. Intervention*

U.N. Report Confirms the Obvious: Reveals 3 Nations Producing Most Refugees Were Targets of U.S. Intervention*

A U.N. report has shown that more than 65 million people were forced to leave their home countries last year, becoming refugees due to deadly conflict. The top nations from which refugees fled have one thing in common, they were all targets of U.S. intervention.

By Whitney Webb

Afghan refugee Rasoul Nazari, 15, holds his 10-month-old nephew Imran after crossing the border between Hungary and Austria in Nickelsdorf, Austria. (AP/Muhammed Muheisen)

A United Nations report has shed light on the world’s burgeoning crisis of displaced peoples, finding that a record 65.6 million were forced to vacate their homes in 2016 alone. More than half of them were minors.

The Office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), which drafted the report, put the figure into perspective, stating that increasing conflict and persecution worldwide have led to “one person being displaced every three seconds – less than the time it takes to read this sentence.”

U.N. High Commissioner Filippo Grandi called the figure “unacceptable” and called for “solidarity and a common purpose in preventing and resolving the crisis.”

However, what the U.N. report failed to mention was the role of U.S. foreign intervention, indirect or direct, in fomenting the conflicts responsible for producing most of the world’s refugees.

According to the report, three of the nations producing the highest number of refugees are Syria (12 million refugees created in 2016), Afghanistan (4.7 million) and Iraq (4.2 million).

The conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan are known to be the direct result of U.S. military invasions in the early 2000s, as well as the U.S.’ ongoing occupation of those nations. Decades after invading both countries, the U.S.’ destabilizing military presence in Iraq and Afghanistan has continued to increase in recent years, with the Trump administration most recently announcing plans to send thousands of soldiers to Afghanistan in the coming months. It is worth noting that each U.S. soldier in Afghanistan costs U.S. taxpayers $2.1 million.

While the U.S. has yet to directly invade Syria, the U.S. role in the conflict is clear and Syria’s destabilization and the overthrow of its current regime have long been planned by the U.S. government. The U.S. and its allies, particularly Israel and Saudi Arabia, have consistently funded “rebel” groups that have not only perpetuated the Syrian conflict for six long years, but have also committed atrocity after atrocity targeting civilians in Syrian cities, towns, and communities – a major factor in convincing Syrians to leave their homes.

The report ranks Colombia as the world’s second-largest producer of refugees, with 7.7 million Colombians displaced in 2016. Like Syria, the U.S. has not directly invaded Colombia, but is known to have extensively funded paramilitary groups, also known as “death squads,” in the country since the 1980s, when then-U.S. President Ronald Reagan declared a “war on drugs” in Colombia.

U.S. efforts have long helped fuel the civil war between the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and pro-government, U.S.-funded paramilitary groups. This conflict has lasted for more than half a century.

In 2000, then-President Bill Clinton’s administration funded the disastrous “Plan Colombia” with $4 billion in U.S. taxpayer funds, ostensibly to fight drug trafficking and insurgents. Almost all of this money was used to fund the Colombian military and its weapon purchases. “Plan Colombia” ultimately intensified armed violence, military deployments, human rights abuses by the Colombian military, and – of course – the internal displacement of Colombians. The legacy of U.S. policy in Colombia and its continuing support of the nation’s right-wing, neo-liberal regime have ensured that the chaos continues into the present.

Clinton ran on Plan Colombia and its sponsoring right wing death squads. https://t.co/yoE56yQLzP

— Tailfoot McWalshy (@BuglegsMcWalshy) March 10, 2017

In addition to the above, U.S foreign policy is also to blame for the conflict in South Sudan, where the UN report found was home to the fastest-growing displacement of people in the world. In 2011, the U.S. pushed South Sudan to secede from Sudan, as South Sudan holds the vast majority of Sudan’s oil reserves — the largest oil reserves in all of Africa. The U.S.’ push for the creation of an independent South Sudan dislodged Chinese claims to Sudanese oil, as the Chinese had previously signed oil contracts with the (now Northern) Sudanese government.

But when nation-building efforts went awry and civil war broke out just two years later, some analysts suggested that the conflict only started when South Sudan’s president began to cozy up to China. According to the UN report, approximately 3.3 million people in South Sudan have fled their homes since the war began.

Grandi has called on the world’s nations to help prevent and resolve the global refugee crisis. But he would also do well to point out the common cause uniting many of the world’s worst conflicts – the U.S. military-industrial complex’s insatiable lust for conquest, power and profit.

Source*

Related Topics:

Imminent Starvation Resulting from U.S. Led Wars: U.N. Officials Warn of Worst Famine Crisis Since World War II*

Trump To Continue Bankrupting The U.S. Through Foreign Wars*

Chinese Billionaire Says U.S. Wasted Trillions on Wars and Wall Street and Forgot about their Citizens*

A Native Perspective on War, Terrorism and the MOAB Bomb*

A Native Perspective on War, Terrorism and the MOAB Bomb*

By Mark Charles

“Mother of All Bombs” blast in Afghanistan on Thursday

 

Friday morning the hosts of Fox and Friends celebrated Thursday’s dropping of the MOAB bomb by the United States military against ISIS in Afghanistan. This was the largest non-nuclear bomb ever detonated in combat, and they aired the video of the explosion to the song by Toby Keith, “Courtesy of the Red, White and Blue.” One of the hosts commented that the video is in black and white, “But that is what freedom looks like. That’s the red, white and blue.” Geraldo Rivera then added that one of his favourite things in the 16 years he’s been on FOX News is watching bombs drop on bad guys.

Last week, after the U.S. launched a barrage of missiles against Syria in retaliation for chemical weapons Assad utilized against civilians, Brian Williams, speaking on MSNBC said he was tempted to quote the great Leonard Cohen, “I am guided by the beauty of our weapons.” Brian went on to describe the missile launch scene as “beautiful pictures of fearsome armaments.”

Terrorism is evil and needs to be confronted. But when we go beyond confronting terrorism to blatantly celebrating the deaths of terrorists, and praising the beauty of our weapons that destroyed them, we are blurring the lines of humanity. And once those lines are crossed, and we dehumanize our enemy, it is a short and slippery slope to becoming the very thing we claim to be fighting against. Soon, we begin looking for prominent religious leaders and institutions to provide theological cover for our violence, and justification for our actions.

 As a follower of Jesus, who was a tribal man brutally executed by a state working in conjunction with its religious leaders…

As a Navajo man, whose ancestors endured acts of genocide and forced removal by a United States government that was armed with a Doctrine of Discovery, and therefore believed it had a manifest destiny to ethnically cleanse and rule these lands from sea to shining sea…

And, as the grandson of indigenous grandparents, who were taken from their homes and educated in boarding schools run by a government and churches that believed it was their civic and religious duty to “kill the Indian to save the man”…

I humbly offer some words of caution.

May we not celebrate war.

May we not glorify violence.

May we not dehumanize our enemies.

For if we could refuse to dehumanize our enemies, it would make the terribleness of war all the more real. And maybe, just maybe, cause us to engage in it less often.

MARK CHARLES

(Navajo)

Source*

Related Topics:

U.S. has Killed over 20 Million People in 37 “Victim Nations” Since World War II*

Trump Wastes over $94mn in Taxpayer’s Money on Ineffective Syrian Airstrikes*

“Hitler Never Gassed His Own People” but the U.S. Did*

Bolivian U.N. Ambassador Blasts U.S. for Another Illegal Attack*

Media Goes Quiet as Russia Exposes U.S. Lies at Security Council*

Rothschild Demands Western Nations Invade Syria*

Former U.K. Ambassador Refers to the West Returning to their Own Vomit

Syria Shoots Down 34 of 59 Cruise Missiles, Russia to Upgrade System*

Cheney, Rothschild, Murdoch Violate International Law By Drilling for Oil in Syria*

U.N. Confirmed Syrian Rebels, Not Assad, Were Using Sarin*

Trump Bombed Syria because they Didn’t Want Peace*

Noble Energy’s Natural Gas Discovery in the Levant Launched U.S.-Israeli Operation ISIS to Oust Assad*

World War 3: Trump Begins Paying His Penance to Rothschilds*

Pentagon Trained Al Qaeda in Syria to Use Chemical Weapons*

Deep State in Panic Mode, Creating Events to Distract from their Activities*

The FBI Played a Central Role in the First ISIS Attack on U.S. Soil*

Disturbing Message to All Americans from Former Defense Minister of Canada on the NWO*

 

Dyncorp, the Private Military Corporation at the Heart of U.S. Foreign Policy Scandal*

Dyncorp, the Private Military Corporation at the Heart of U.S. Foreign Policy Scandal*

By Elizabeth Vos

Over ten years ago, Georgia Congresswoman Cynthia McKinney asked Donald Rumsfeld during a hearing on the proposed 2006 Department for Defense Budget:

“Mr. Secretary, is it policy of the U.S. government to reward companies that traffic in women and little girls? That’s my first question.”

McKinney’s query, broadcast on C-SPAN, received few solid answers.

Cynthia McKinney is not the only legislator who has asked questions about the role and funding of U.S. paramilitary organizations. Janice Schakowsky, a Democrat Representative of Chicago was quoted by The New York Times:

”Is the U.S. military privatizing its missions to avoid public controversy or embarrassment — to hide body bags from the media and shield the military from public opinion?”… “ the contractors… don’t have to follow the same chain of command, the military code of conduct may or may not apply, the accountability is absent and the transparency is absent — but the money keeps flowing.”

The New York Times article described the essential problem of the government using private contractors like Dyncorp: “Outsourcing military missions also lets the Pentagon do things Congress might not approve… while the Pentagon has secrets, it also fundamentally recognizes that it is a public institution. Not so the contractors, whose first allegiance is to their shareholders.”

Dan Baum wrote in his 2003 article Guns For Hire: “DynCorp offers the military an alternative to itself.”

Cynthia McKinney served six terms in the United States House of Representatives. She left the Democratic Party in 2008, and ran as the Presidential candidate of the Green Party of the United States.

 

In addition to its paramilitary endeavors in the field, Dyncorp has placed heavy emphasis on IT. It became heavily involved in the software industry in the 1990’s under the leadership of Paul Lombardi. In 2003, Dyncorp was acquired by “Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC),” primarily a software firm providing services such as: “various cloud offerings, including Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), private cloud solutions, CloudMail and Storage as a Service (SaaS).”

Dyncorp’s early emphasis on IT while under the leadership of Lombardi and CSC may explain part of Cynthia McKinney’s question for Donald Rumsfeld. She demanded on record to be told who had received IT contracts at the DOD and other departments which had “lost” trillions of dollars. McKinney asked during the Department of Defense Budget hearing:

“My second question, Mr. Secretary, is, who has the contract today to make those systems communicate with each other? How long have they had those contracts? And how much have the taxpayers paid for them?”

McKinney’s question was answered by Ms. Tina Jonas, who refused to give names on the record. Ms Jonas served as the “chief financial officer and assistant director of the Finance Division,” of the FBI before she was “nominated by President Bush to be the undersecretary of defense at the Department of Defense.” She has also held leading positions in numerous private companies associated with aerospace and defense.

CSC has also been investigated for fraud, with Margaret Hodge describing it as a “rotten company providing a hopeless system.”

In 2010, Dyncorp International became a subsidiary of Cerberus in a deal valued at $1.5 billion. Cerberus’ founder has been described as “a notable backer of Republican candidates… [who] served on Mr. Trump’s economic advisory council.”

From Salon’s 2002 Article “Crime without punishment,” by Robert Capps

 

However, Republicans like Donald Rumsfeld have not been the only defenders of Dyncorp. A 2009 email released by wikileaks reveals Cheryl Mills warning then- Secretary of State Hillary Clinton of a possible upcoming Washington Post article. The expose would describe an event where Dyncorp employees had hired a 15 year old boy to do “mock lap dances,” with “DynCorp employees putting dollar bills in the boy’s waistband, just as they would a stripper’s garter.” Additional Wikileaks cables described the event in terms of “purchasing a service from a child,” emphasizing strategies to convince a journalist not to cover the story in order to not “risk lives.”

Although the email between Mills and Hillary claims “no sex took place,” the tradition of bachabaze in Afghanistan often involves rape, the boys “sold to the highest bidder.” BBC News reports: “The most disturbing thing is what happens after the parties. Often the boys are taken to hotels and sexually abused…There are many people who support this tradition across Afghanistan and many of them are very influential.”” BBC News also interviewed a bacha who reported that: ”Sometimes he is gang raped.” Meanwhile CBS News reported described Dyncorp’s “Dancing Afghan Boy Problem.”

Photograph from The Daily Mail article: “The secret shame of Afghanistan’s bacha bazi ‘dancing boys’ who are made to dress like little girls, then abused by paedophiles”

 

Dyncorp’s involvement in another a sex scandal with minors while serving in a war torn country may well have felt like deja vu for the Secretary of State, considering the infamous Dyncorp scandal in the Balkans during Bill Clinton’s term in office.

Ben Johnston filed a RICO lawsuit against Dyncorp after he was fired ostensibly for reporting human rights abuses by their employees in Bosnia. In a 2002 report titled “Dyncorp Disgrace,” Johnston was quoted:

“…None of the girls… were from Bosnia… They were imported in by DynCorp and the Serbian mafia. These guys would say ‘I gotta go to Serbia this weekend topick up three girls.’… “DynCorp leadership was 100% in bed with the mafia over there.”

Salon reported:

“Johnston recoiled in horror when he heard one of his fellow helicopter mechanics at a U.S. Army base near Tuzla, Bosnia, brag one day in early 2000: “My girl’s not a day over 12….… the bragging about a 12-year-old sex slave pushed Johnston over the edge. “I had to do something,” he says. “There were kids involved.” …. At least 13 DynCorp employees have been sent home from Bosnia … for purchasing women or participating in other prostitution-related activities. But despite large amounts of evidence in some cases, none of the DynCorp employees sent home have faced criminal prosecution.

Johnston’s RICO lawsuit was not the only instance of wrongdoing to come out of Dyncorp’s U.N. peace keeping contract in Bosnia. The Guardian wrote: ”Kathryn Bolkovac, from Nebraska, was sacked by Dyncorp of Virginia, to which peacekeeping police work in Bosnia had been outsourced…” “She signed up with DynCorp, providing American personnel for the U.N…” Bolkavac’s story was later fictionalized into the film Whistleblower, starring Rachel Weisz.

Poster for the film The Whistleblower, starring Rachel Weisz

 

The Oxford Journal of Conflict and Security Law published an article which read:

”U.N. military peacekeepers are increasingly being accused of human rights abuses while deployed on U.N. missions. These personnel are rarely held accountable for their conduct given that they are granted immunity from criminal prosecution by the host State by a plethora of legal instruments, in particular a Status of Forces Agreement (SOFA).”

The contractors fell into a legal grey area between a broken Bosnian legal system and American military oversight. Washington University Global Studies Law Review also published:

“U.N. Peacekeepers and Sexual Abuse and Exploitation: An End to Impunity.” Author Elizabeth F. Defeis wrote: “The United Nations … stands accused of egregious acts of sexual abuse and exploitation committed by U.N. peacekeepers and civilian personnel.” Authorities claimed the Dayton Peace Accord put the men under Bosnian authority, while the U.N. affords legal immunity to peacekeepers

Culpability was further complicated by the international nature of Dyncorp and its subsidiaries. The Guardian explained:

“Although Dyncorp was an American company, her [Bolkovac’s] contract was governed under the laws of England.” Despite Dyncorp International’s being located in Texas, “Dyncorp Aerospace in Aldershot is a British Firm… a British subsidiary of the U.S. company DynCorp Inc.”

Ben Johnston eventually settled out of court , while Bolkovac won her case against Dyncorp. Salon reported:

“both Johnston and his attorney said they viewed the settlement as a victory — and as a vindication after two years of fighting the company.”

The New York Times related Bolkovac’s victory:

“A British tribunal has ruled that a former member of the U.N. police force in Bosnia was unfairly fired after she reported to her superiors that colleagues in the police force used women and children as sex slaves in connivance with Balkan traffickers.” The Telegraph also reported: “The tribunal stated, ‘It is hard to imagine a case in which a firm has behaved in a more callous manner.”

Kathryn Bolkovac, who was featured in The Telegraph’s article, “What the U.N. Doesn’t Want You to Know”

 

In the aftermath of Bosnia, the United States demanded heightened immunity for Americans serving as U.N. peacekeepers, as opposed to increased accountability. Dyncorp continued to receive contracts.

The U.N. was implicated in further sex abuse scandals in nations where peace keepers operate with immunity. In 2012 Reuters reported:

“Two U.N. peacekeepers from Pakistan have been sentenced to a year in prison for raping a 14-year-old Haitian boy… Several peacekeepers have been accused of rape, in addition to the Pakistanis, in cases that have fueled public protests and demands that members of the U.N. force be stripped of their immunity and face trial in Haitian courts.” U.N. Peace Keepers were also reported to have been caught on video raping an eighteen year old Haitian youth.

In The Guardian’s article: Report reveals shame of U.N. peacekeepers:

“Embarrassment caused by the misconduct of U.N. forces [in] Haiti, Sierra Leone, Bosnia, Cambodia, East Timor and the Democratic Republic of the Congo(DRC) … [troops] … were regularly having sex with girls aged as young as 12, sometimes in the mission’s administrative buildings.”

The situation in Haiti was so serious that BBC reported Sri Lanka had: ”promised to look into allegations that 108 of its U.N. peacekeepers in Haiti paid for sex, in some cases with underage girls …more than 700 peacekeepers in Ivory Coast were suspended…”

Dyncorp was once again contracted to provide troops for the U.N. in Haiti during this period.

In 2015 Rosa Freedman, senior lecturer at Birmingham Law School wrote in an article published by CNN:

“Why do peacekeepers have immunity in sex abuse cases?” She explained:

“The problem is not new. Over the last two decades, peacekeepers have been accused of abuses in Liberia, Congo, Bosnia and Haiti. Personnel have forced women and children to have sex in exchange for food, have trafficked women into U.N. missions and systematically raped them, and have committed other egregious acts of sexual violence

In 2011, “DynCorp agreed to pay the United States $7.7 million to resolve allegations that it submitted inflated claims for the construction of container camps at various locations in Iraq.” In 2009 The Washington Post had reported that Dyncorp was being forced to “Replace the senior managers… after [The State Department] launched an investigation into the company’s handling of an employee who died of a possible drug overdose.” Dyncorp reportedly lost $1 billion it was given by the State Department to train Iraqi police .

Despite all of this, as late as December last year, Dyncorp received a new $94 million contract with the U.S. Navy. Dyncorp will:

“facilitate humanitarian aid, civic assistance, minor military construction and contingency programs to support exercises and other initiatives…”

The numerous scandals embroiling Dyncorp over the years have exemplified McKinney’s first question to Rumsfeld; “Why do these companies continue to receive government contracts?”

Source*

Related Topics:

DynCorp Mercenaries Replace Blackwater Mercenaries in Yemen*

Two-Thirds of Afghanistan Reconstruction Money Went to DynCorp International*

Trump is Filling Top Pentagon and Homeland Security Positions With Defense Contractors*

The U.S. Spent a Half Billion on Mining in Afghanistan with ‘Limited Progress’*

U.N. Peacekeeper Gang Rapes*

With Cover-ups UN Quietly Offers DNA Tests for ‘Peacekeeper Babies’ & Sexual Abuse Claims*

Pentagon Approves U.N. Use of Force against Civilians*

From Child Trafficking to Head of U.N. Ops. in Haiti

U.N. ‘Peacekeeping’ Force Open Fire on Protesters in Haiti*

After Creating Haiti’s Cholera Crisis, U.N. Can Barely Fight It*

U.S. Rape and Sodomy of Iraqi Women and Children*

U.S. Soldiers Raped Boys in Front of Their Mothers*

Japan Officially asked the U.S. to Stop Military-related Rapes*

U.S. Sponsors Rape in Congo*

50,000+ Okinawans Gather for anti-U.S. Military Rally after another Rape and Murder by U.S. Soldier*

Children Sexually Assaulted at E.U.’s Official Refugee Camps*

 

No Force on Earth can Compete with NATO and U.S.’ Drug Trafficking Business in Afghanistan*

No Force on Earth can Compete with NATO and U.S.’ Drug Trafficking Business in Afghanistan*

By Jonas E. Alexis

“In country after country, from Mexico and Honduras to Panama and Peru, the CIA helped set up or consolidate intelligence agencies that became forces of repression, and whose intelligence connections to other countries greased the way for illicit drug shipments.”

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov has done it again. He has recently grabbed the New World Order establishment by the horn and cut them to pieces with a chainsaw when he said that the establishment has done covert and illegal operations in places like Afghanistan. Lavrov did not mince words:

The U.S. operation against the Taliban and al-Qaeda was supported by all countries. It’s another matter that after receiving the international approval, the United States and its NATO allies, which took over in Afghanistan, started acting rather inconsistently, to put it mildly.

“During their operation in Afghanistan, the terrorist threat has not been rooted out, while the drug threat has increased many times over. The drug industry prospered. There is factual evidence that some of the NATO contingents in Afghanistan turned a blind eye to the illegal drug trafficking, even if they were not directly involved in these criminal schemes.

“Afghanistan is a separate case, although the current developments there, which are a result of the NATO operation’s failure, despite the carte blanche the bloc received from the international community, can be considered an unintended cause of managed chaos. In Iraq, Syria and Libya, this chaos was created intentionally.”

Lavrov is right in line with the scholarly world. Peter Dale Scott of the University of California writes:

“In country after country, from Mexico and Honduras to Panama and Peru, the CIA helped set up or consolidate intelligence agencies that became forces of repression, and whose intelligence connections to other countries greased the way for illicit drug shipments.”

Noted historian Alfred W. McCoy of the University of Wisconsin has reported the same thing. McCoy began to work on this issue while he was a Ph.D. candidate in Southeast Asian history at Yale back in 1972. He accused American officials “of condoning and even cooperating with corrupt elements in Southeast Asia’s illegal drug trade out of political and military considerations.” McCoy’s

“major charges was that South Vietnam’s President Nguyễn Văn Thiệu, Vice President Nguyễn Cao Kỳ, and Prime Minister Trần Thiện Khiêm led a narcotics ring with ties to the Corsican mafia, the Trafficante crime family in Florida, and other high level military officials in South Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, and Thailand. Those implicated by McCoy included Laotian Generals Ouane Rattikone and Vang Pao and South Vietnamese Generals Đăng Văn Quang and Ngô Dzu.”

McCoy produced enough evidence which indicated that the CIA used “tribal mercenaries” in places like Laos in order to maintain their criminal and drug trafficking business.

In short, Lavrov was essentially deconstructing the CIA when he said that they have been spreading corruption throughout the world for decades. Whenever they take a break from spreading opium, they start perpetuating wars and creating false flags in Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya, and now in Syria.

The CIA is certainly not happy about what Lavrov has said. This is one reason why they hate Russia and all that it represents.

Source*

Related Topics:

Over 100 Civilians Dead after Recent U.S. Raids on Alleged al-Qaeda Training Camps*

Over 100 Civilians Dead after Recent U.S. Raids on Alleged al-Qaeda Training Camps*

By Amando Flavio

The so-called war on terror waged around the world by the United States is still raging on. The truth about this war is that every single bullet or bomb fired by United States forces drives dozens of people into the hands of militants.

The war is not hitting terrorists, as the Pentagon wants us to believe. It is the innocent civilians who are bearing the brunt of United States’ firepower. Since the United States started the war on terror in the Middle East in 2001, literally countless amounts of civilians have lost their lives in the region.

In February 2016, the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) revealed that it recorded a record high civilian death and injuries on the United States war on terror in Afghanistan the previous year. UNAMA said Afghan civilian casualties’ figures in 2016 – killed or maimed from the war – stood at 11,418.

When this announcement was made by UNAMA, a former top Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) official, Jack Rice, said the indiscriminate killings of civilians by United States armed forces in Afghanistan are driving the country’s civilian population to join militant and other terrorist groups in the country. Mr Rice stated that the U.S.-led war against terror in the country is a complete sham. According to him, the rise in civilian casualties in wars waged by the United States in the Middle East and other parts of the world is a single contributing factor to the proliferation of militant and terrorist groups in these areas.

However, the United States government isn’t bothered by critics such as Mr Rice. The wars still continue and more civilians die.

Recent raids by the United States military on alleged al-Qaeda training camps in Syria and Yemen have left over 100 innocent people dead, according to human rights groups monitoring the situation in the two restive countries.

Both Syria and Yemen are ravaged by bloody civil wars. The United States is in some ways involved in these two wars. In Syria, the United States is leading a bombing campaign, claiming to target the Islamic State. The United States is again supporting a Saudi-led air campaign against rebels fighting to overthrow the current government of Yemen.

Recently, the White House announced that it is sending ground troops to Syria – though unrequested by Assad. But the truth is that U.S. ground troops have been in Syria and Yemen for some time now.  The troops gather intelligence, as well as carrying out covert raids on militants’ bases in the countries.

In late January, President Donald Trump authorized a raid on an alleged al-Qaeda headquarters located in the al Bayda Governorate in Yemen. After the raid, the Pentagon described it a success. But human rights activists told media outlets that the raid only succeeded in killing many civilians.

This compelled the United States Central Command to say its internal review team “concluded regrettably that civilian non-combatants were likely killed in the midst of a firefight” during the raid, adding that casualties may include children.

Although initial reports suggested around 10 civilians died in the raid, a subsequent investigation carried out by the BBC revealed over 50 civilians perished – the majority of them were women and children. Local residents told the BBC that although some militants sporadically use their village as a meeting place, as of the time the United States forces arrived, no militants were present in the village. Residents categorically denied the Pentagon’s claim that their village is a headquarters for al-Qaeda in the al Bayda province.  They revealed that when the United States forces arrived and started shooting, many in the village were confused, and because the country is at war, many residents have guns. They also opened fire, leading to many bombs being dropped on them by fighter jets. Residents said they retrieved over 50 bodies, many of them burned beyond recognition. The death toll was also confirmed by activists who visited the village.

As this appalling situation just passes, on March 16, U.S. drone aircraft fired missiles and dropped a 500-pound bomb outside the city of Aleppo in Syria. As usual, the Pentagon said the raid targeted al-Qaeda militants, and that it killed scores of them.

But activists have said the raid never hit any militants. According to activists, the bombs were dropped on civilians who had gathered at a local mosque in Jinah for a religious activity. It is said over 46 civilians were killed in the raid.

The Western-backed Syrian Observatory for Human Rights described the scene as a “massacre,” revealing the dead were mostly civilians. Photos from the area showed rescue workers pulling mangled bodies from a mound of rubble.

“Bodies filled the space,” said Mohamed al-Shaghal, a journalist who arrived at the scene shortly after the attack. He said the mosque was completely destroyed, adding that many residents are now living in fear as they don’t know when the next bomb will drop.

Source*

Related Topics:

Trump Orders Drone Strike on Syrian Mosque, 40 Civilians Killed*

U.N. Praises Iran’s “Exemplary” Leadership in Hosting Refugees*

Syrian Air Defense Shoots Down one of 4 Israeli Warplanes Targeting Military Site near Palmyra*

Nine Young Children Killed: The Full Details of the Botched U.S. Raid in Yemen*

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U.N. Praises Iran’s “Exemplary” Leadership in Hosting Refugees*

U.N. Praises Iran’s “Exemplary” Leadership in Hosting Refugees*

“It’s a story that’s not told often enough,” said a representative for U.N. high commissioner for refugees

By Nadia Prupis

“The leadership demonstrated by the Iranian government has been exemplary in hosting refugees and keeping borders open,” Sivanka Dhanapala said on Wednesday. (Photo: European Commission DG ECHO/flickr/cc)

 

The United Nations praised Iran’s “exemplary” refugee resettlement program this week, saying the country’s decades-long effort to house approximately 3 million displaced Afghans was “a story that’s not told often enough.”

Sivanka Dhanapala, head of the office for the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees in Tehran, made the remarks on the same day that President Donald Trump sought to reinstate a controversial 90-day ban on travelers from six majority-Muslim countries, including Iran, and a 120-day ban on all refugees. The new executive order was blocked from going into effect by two courts.

Roughly 6 million people were displaced from Afghanistan to neighboring countries amid the Soviet War in 1979. Nearly 40 years later, Tehran still shelters 1 million registered refugees, and another 2 million are thought to be living there, making it the world’s fourth-largest refugee population.

“The leadership demonstrated by the Iranian government has been exemplary in hosting refugees and keeping borders open,” Dhanapala said on Wednesday.

The U.N. also hailed a 2015 directive from Ayatollah Seyyed Ali Khamenei that called on education administrators to allow all Afghan children, documented or not, to attend Iranian schools.

“We’ve also worked with the government on incorporating refugees into a government-sponsored health Add New insurance scheme which is a ground-breaking development not just for Iran but globally for refugees,” Dhanapala said.

“In a world where you have multiple bad stories about hosting refugees, I think Iran is really a good news story,” he said.

“It’s a story that’s not told often enough.”

Source*

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U.N. Confirms U.S. Airstrikes in Afghanistan Killed At Least 18 Civilians*

U.N. Confirms U.S. Airstrikes in Afghanistan Killed At Least 18 Civilians*
By Jason Ditz
While the U.S. is still insisting there is “no evidence” of any civilians killed in Friday’s attacks on the Helmand Province, the United Nations has conducted a preliminary assessment, and found at least 18 civilians killed in the US airstrikes, overwhelmingly women and children.

This is roughly in line with local estimates, which put the civilian death toll at 22 in the airstrikes, which destroyed a number of homes in the village of Lakari. The village is under the Taliban’s control, and used as one of several staging areas against Lashkar Gah.

Reports suggest that the U.S. was attempting to target Taliban forces who occupy the village’s mosque, but ended up hitting nearby residential neighbourhoods instead, leveling homes and burying a number of civilians within.

The U.S. has promised a formal review, but so far only of the “credibility” of the allegations, and not of the death toll itself. This unwillingness to take such incidents seriously after initial reports is a big part of why official U.S. reports tend to underreport the death tolls quite significantly, as by the time they decide something is credible enough to investigate, all the victims have been buried for months.

Source*

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