Tag Archive | Ghana

The CIA, Kwame Nkrumah, and the Destruction of Ghana*

The CIA, Kwame Nkrumah, and the Destruction of Ghana*

VT’s Gordon Duff and Samuel Bunyan visit the tomb of Kwame Nkrumah in 2016

Kwame Nkrumah (21 September 1909 – 27 April 1972) was the first President of the first free nation in Africa, and a founding father of the Pan-Africanist movement.

His dream was to turn Ghana into a modern industrial utopia – a society shaped by the power of science that would serve as a model for the rest of the African continent. At the heart of his plan was the Volta Dam, a hydroelectric power plant that would provide Ghana with all the cheap power that it would need to initiate an industrial revolution.

In 1935 Kwame Nkruma left Ghana for the United States as a student, receiving a BA from Lincoln University, Pennsylvania in 1939.  During that time, he was elected president of the African Students Organization of America and Canada. He was also exposed to the philosophy and teachings of Marcus Garvey, and the Communist teachings of a U.S. based Trotskyist intellectual cohort. Nkrumah later credited these ideas with teaching him ‘how an underground movement worked’.

In 1947, Nkrumah returned to Ghana. Using the political mechanisms he saw there, he returned to Ghana and within two years created the country’s first political party. Within two years after that, he was swept into power as the first Black Prime Minister in Africa under the British colonial system.

With the threat of uprisings abroad and financial crisis at home, Britain reluctantly set Ghana free on March 6, 1957. Nkrumah easily won election as the country’s first President, and chose a flag with the Black star–inspired by Marcus Garvey’s Black Star Line – at its centre to represent the new nation.

Nkrumah also launched a series of popular social projects on behalf of his people (who loved him), including The Organization of African Unity (OAU). The OAU was established on 25 May 1963. One year later, Malcolm X established the Organization for African American Unity (OAAU) modeled after Kwame’s idea.

The Volta Dam

Volta Dam, Ghana

If Ghana was to become a modern industrial nation, it needed both industry and the power to fuel that industry and provide the continent with its first industrial revolution. The Volta dam was originally the brain child of Britain, but the colonial power was shrinking from the world stage and in doing so, began to withdraw its financial and project support from its former colonies. During his campaign, Nkrumah’s platform was founded on the idea of modernization, but without funding for the Volta river project, there was no way that dream could become a reality.

Nkrumah set back out for America to sell the project to then President Eisenhower who took an immediate interest. Ghana at the time was literate, wealthy (as a result of its already profitable cocoa exports, and made a great business prospect for America. And the benefits to America as a young world superpower were two-fold:

– First, the manufacturing process for a new metal called aluminum had been discovered, and aluminum ore was abundant in Ghana.
– Second, the world’s energy prices were raising, and having access to a cheap source of electricity with which to process aluminum would have greatly increased the profit margins and reduced processing costs for the manufacture of the metal.

President Eisenhower contacted California based Kaiser Aluminum, the world’s largest aluminum manufacturer, to exploit the opportunity and fund the project. The assumption that America would mine Ghana’s bauxite and use the Volta dam’s electricity meant two new large income streams and industries that would assure Nkrumah’s dream of an industrial revolution. However, Kaiser Aluminum had different plans. They would only use Ghana’s cheap electricity – importing aluminum ore from other places in the world, and then exporting the aluminum back to America. The thought was that if the operation became too profitable, Nkrumah could nationalize the dam project and cut America out completely.

Nkrumah was crushed. The aluminum industry would have done for Ghana what the steel industry had done for the United States. Nkrumah ultimately had to agree to America’s terms if he wanted the dam to be built, but as an additional stipulation, he had to raise $30 million on his own. He sought help from the World Bank, an operation initially set up to fund the recovery effort in post WWII Europe, but which later became a source of funding for the rest of the world. Nkrumah’s young new country was now indebted to the World Bank, and the dam became a leash by which the United States could control Nkrumah and exploit the country.

The exploitation of Ghana went into full swing; it became a haven for American and European industrialists who were interested in taking advantage of the country’s desire to modernize. White corporations would repeatedly dupe officials into purchasing whatever could be sold, no matter how inappropriate (a Belgian company sold the country snow plows¬. Yea, snow plows. In Africa).

The Volta Dam was completed on January 22, 1966. One month later, Nkrumah was overthrown by a CIA backed coup.

CIA Involvement [image: Nkrumah independence rally 194×300 The CIA, Kwame Nkrumah, and the Destruction of Ghana]

On March 11, 1965, almost a year before the coup, William P. Mahoney, the U.S. ambassador to Ghana, participated in a candid discussion in Washington, D.C., with CIA Director John A. McCone and the deputy chief of the CIA’s Africa division, whose name has been withheld. Significantly, the Africa division was part of the CIA’s directorate of plans (AKA Department of Dirty Tricks) through which the government pursued its covert policies.

According to the record of their meeting (Document 251), topic one was the “Coup d’état Plot, Ghana.” While Mahoney was satisfied that popular opinion was running strongly against Nkrumah and the economy of the country was in a precarious state, he was not convinced that the coup d’état, now being planned by Acting Police Commissioner Harlley and Generals Otu and Ankrah, would necessarily take place. However, he predicted that one way or another Nkrumah would be out within a year. Revealing the depth of embassy knowledge of the plot, Mahoney referred to a recent report which mentioned that the top coup conspirators were scheduled to meet on 10 March at which time they would determine the timing of the coup.

After the coup, Komer wrote a congratulatory assessment to President Eisenhower on March 12, 1966 (Document 260).

“The coup in Ghana is another example of a fortuitous windfall. Nkrumah was doing more to undermine our interests than any other black African. In reaction to his strongly pro-Communist leanings, the new military regime is almost pathetically pro-Western.”

John Stockwell, a CIA officer in Africa at the time made the following statement:

*“Howard Bane, who was the CIA station chief in Accra, engineered the overthrow of Kwame Nkrumah. Inside the CIA it was quite clear. Howard Bane got a double promotion, and was awarded the Intelligence Star for the overthrow of Kwame. The magic of it was that Howard Bane had enough imagination and drive to run this operation without ever documenting what he was doing and there wasn’t one shred of paper that was generated that would name the CIA hierarchy as being responsible.“

But in this age of information and Wikileaks, we now know the CIA ties to the destruction of Kwame Nkrumah ran deep: See: Documents Expose U.S. Role in Nkrumah Overthrow John Stockwell elaborated on the coup in his memoir, In Search of Enemies:

A CIA Story:

“The Accra station was encouraged by CIA headquarters to maintain contact with dissidents of the Ghanaian army for the purpose of gathering intelligence on their activities. It was given a generous budget, and maintained intimate contact with the plotters as a coup was hatched. So close was the station’s involvement that it was able to coordinate the recovery of some classified Soviet military equipment by the United States as the coup took place.”

According to Stockwell, Banes’ sense of initiative knew no bounds. The station even proposed to headquarters through back channels that a squad be on hand at the moment of the coup to storm the [Communist] Chinese embassy, kill everyone inside, steal their secret records, and blow up the building to cover the facts.

The Destruction of Ghana

After the coup, the once wealthy nation of Ghana was milked dry. Kwame fled in exile to Conakry, Guinea – never to return to his home country. After 19 years of prosperity under Nkrumah, Ghana slid back into the dark ages.

After the coup, the Kaiser Dam project flourished, continuing to make payments to the World Bank and continuing to yield dividends to its parent corporation. The people of Ghana saw almost none of the benefit. Instead, the people got one military coup after another (7 total). In the 1950s, the world celebrated Nkrumah and Ghana. After the coup, the American propaganda machine painted the country and its leader as corrupt, savage, and unstable. Kwame was called “the Communist Messiah” and Africa was said to be “unable to handle the pressures of modern industrialization. Kwame Nkruma’s organization was hijacked by the United Nations, and is now a tool used to expand the program of African exploitation.

But even in exile, Nkrumah continued to write and inspire Pan-Africanists. In Challenge of the Congo he wrote that the political economic situation in the world is one in which a tiny minority of the people grower “richer and richer, while the rest grow poorer and poorer” and elaborated by saying that the situation required world socialism as it was the only remedy, for “as long as capitalism and imperialism go unchecked there will always be exploitation, and an ever-widening gap between the haves and the have-nots, and all the evils of imperialism and neo-colonialism which breed and sustain wars.”

Death and Remembrance

Kwame Nkrumah died of skin cancer in April 1972. He was 62 years old. He was survived by Gokeh, Samia Yarba (who received the 2006 European Parliament Award for Journalism), and Sekou Ritz Nkrumah.

Nkrumah was buried in a tomb in the village of his birth, Nkroful, Ghana. While the tomb remains in Nkroful, his remains were transferred to a large national memorial tomb and park in Accra.

Over his lifetime, Nkrumah was awarded honorary doctorates by Lincoln University, Moscow State University; Cairo University in Cairo, Egypt; Jagiellonian University in Kraków, Poland; Humboldt University in theformer East Berlin; and many other universities.

In 2000, he was voted Africa’s man of the millennium. So who was Kwame Nkrumah? He was Africa’s Malcolm X. He was a true and benevolent leader and martyr. He was a visionary upon whom the hopes and dreams of a continent and a Black world rested. And he was a victim of the United States of America, capitalism, and the same program devoted to the destruction of the Black race that is still in existence today.

Source*

Related Topics:

Go to Ghana and Learn How to Behave*

Ghanaian Company Invests $9M in Failing Black Chicago Bank*

From Ghana Ebola as a Virus Does not Exist Except for Those Who Got Sick from the Shots*

Rothschild did to India what China is doing to Ghana*

Genetically Engineered Bt Cotton in Ghana: The hidden Agenda Exposed

Stop Meddling in Africa‚ COSATU Provincial Secretary Tells U.S.*

Gambian President was Installed by the CIA*

Thousands of Africans Rise Up Against Bill Gates*

BP, Trafigura and Vitol Export Dirty Oil to Africa to Kill People*

Feds Make Record Gains On Human Trafficking As Global Networks are Broken Up*

Feds Make Record Gains On Human Trafficking As Global Networks are Broken Up*

By William Craddick

While the mainstream media’s attention has been fixed on political drama in Washington D.C., federal and state law enforcement have been quietly working to dismantle a shockingly large number of human trafficking and child abuse networks across the United States. The busts in America come at the same time as a number of other successful international law enforcement operations against networks engaging in human trafficking of women and children.

Since the inauguration of Donald Trump on January 20th, 2017, the number of trafficking arrests for human trafficking in 2017 have doubled the total numbers provided for the entire year of 2014 by the Department of Justice. Each individual law enforcement operation has been listed below for reader convenience:

Domestic Trafficking Busts

January 27th: 42 arrested in Memphis, Tennessee during a human trafficking operation led by the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation. Arrestees included a medical professional, engineers, a law student, a tow truck driver and construction workers.

January 29th: 474 arrested, 27 adults and 28 sexually exploited children saved in an operation spearheaded by more than 30 federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and task forces in Los Angeles, California. The bust of the sex ring was the largest human trafficking operation in United States history and was largely ignored by the media.

On the same day, five individuals were arrested in Bucks County, Pennsylvania as part of what authorities described as a fetish-themed child predator sex ring. The Pennsylvania Attorney General stated that the arrests were part of an ongoing investigation and that they believed the child abuse sex ring involved more victims and predators.

February 1st: 11 women rescued in an operation lead by the New Orleans Violent Crime against Children and Human Trafficking task force. No arrests were reported.

February 5th: 108 arrests were reported in Illinois as what was described as part of a national sex trafficking sting operation occurring in 15 different states.

178 individuals were arrested in Texas on the same day as part of the same John’s Suppression Initiative. Arrestees included the sports agent responsible for getting Roger Clemens the highest ever single-season Major League Baseball contract.

In addition to the arrests in Illinois and Texas, 464 other individuals were arrested in the same interstate operation on Super Bowl Sunday. Police stated that six minors and 86 adults were rescued during the operation.

February 10th: 160 individuals were arrested during an immigration crackdown in Los Angeles, California. 150 of the individuals arrested had criminal histories, many including child sex offenses.

February 13th: 22 arrested, 15 adults and 2 child victims saved at Detroit’s North American International Auto Show.

February 14th: The FBI raided the adoption agency European Adoption Consultants (EAC) in Strongsville, Ohio. In December the State Department debarred the agency from continued operation, citing failures “to adequately supervise…preventing the sale, abduction, exploitation, or trafficking of children.”

February 15th: 11 men were arrested during a child sex sting operation in Spotsylvania County, Virginia. One of the arrestees was working part time at a local Christian school.

42 individuals were also arrested in Polk County, Florida as part of a child pornography and sex offender investigation.

International Trafficking Busts

January 27th: 13 individuals were arrested in connection with a paedophile ring in Quebec, Canada. Several of the arrestees held positions as teachers and scout leaders.

February 5th: 9 individuals were arrested and 31 children and women rescued during a police raid at the Kaliko Beach Club resort in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Users online speculated that the arrests may have been related to an announcement two days earlier from the Clinton Foundation that they would be quitting their projects in Haiti.

February 10th: Six men aged 20 to 66 were arrested on child pornography charges involving 168 underage male victims in Japan

February 13th: 16 suspects were arrested and 24 children freed by the GhanaPolice Anti-Human Trafficking Unit (ATHU) from the Volta Lake in the process of being transported to other parts of the country to be sold into forced labour. Online users have pointed out the the now closed Clinton Global Initiative partnered with a program known as The Post Harvest Project (TPHP) in the Volta Lake area of Ghana, though at this time there is no definitive indication as to whether the arrests were related the project or not.

Notable Individual Arrests

February 13th: Jeffery Sandusky, the adopted son of disgraced child abuser Jerry Sandusky, was arrested on child molestation charges. He is accused of solicitation of statutory sexual assault, solicitation of involuntary deviate sexual intercourse, six counts of unlawful contact with a minor and two counts each of solicitation to photograph or depict sexual acts, sexual abuse of children and corruption of minors.

February 15th: A man was arrested in Wayland, New York on charges of Possessing a Sexual Performance of a Child and Promoting Sexual Performance of a Child. Users online speculated that the individual was the Chief Analyst for the New York National Guard after a Linkedin profile was discovered under the same name as the arrestee.

Additionally, a newly appointed special prosecutor in Cleveland, Ohio reopened over 70 child sex cases according to reports on February 14th. A Jane Doe Plaintiff has also filed a new civil case on January 26th against notorious billionaire pedophile Jeffery Epstein and his associates Ghislaine Maxwell, Lesley Groff, Sarah Kellen, and Natalya Malyshev. The charges relate to the underage sex ring being run by Epstein that was uncovered in 2005. A pretrial conference will occur on March 9, 2017, in New York City.

Source*

Related Topics:

42 Arrested in Tennessee Sex Trafficking Operation*

Flight Attendant Saves Girl from Human Trafficking*

The Clinton-Silsby Trafficking Scandal and the Media Cover-Up*

Planned Parenthood was Caught Covering up Child Sex Trafficking*

One Man Helped to Rescue 6,000 Sex Trafficking Victims*

Israelis Trafficking in Syrian Children’s Body Organs*

Egypt Busts Int’l Organ Trafficking Network*

Israel is the Organ Harvesting and Human Trafficking Global Ringleader, with Help from U.S. and Turkey*

Dozens of Cops Implicated in Suit for “Trafficking, Raping, Victimizing” Underage “Sex Slave”*

Child Trafficking in the U.K. and the Child Protection System*

Pope Francis Found Guilty Of Child Trafficking, Rape, Murder*

Arizona Child Traffick Racketeering via CPS and Doctors on Trial before U.S. Supreme Court*

Major lawsuit Hits Israeli Minister, Judges, and U.S. Zionist Donors for Child Trafficking*

Informants Evidence of Canadian Politicians, Churchmen involved in Child Trafficking and Ritual Sacrifices*

Go to Ghana and Learn How to Behave*

Go to Ghana and Learn How to Behave*

By Jenerali Ulimwengu

I honestly did not expect Yahya Jammeh to take a cue from my last article and go back on his word to respect the results of the Gambian elections. All I said was that it was surprising for a man of his nastiness to be civilised when his people reject him.

But there you are, the man has reneged on his earlier pledge and now questions the whole process.

When this saga was unfolding I was in Ghana, and though my mission there was to act as an observer of the Ghanaian elections, I could not help but marvel at something else other than the posturing of politicians from the two principal formations who were dancing and making predictions of their own impending victories.

In short order, the incumbent President John Dramani Mahama conceded defeat and congratulated his rival, Nana Akufo-Addo, this being the first time a sitting head of state had been defeated.

We all celebrated this development, which confirmed the high level of civility in Ghanaian society. And that was what was on my mind all that time, the civility of Ghanaians.

Let’s talk about it, especially because it is all too common for us to be quick to point out faults and shortcomings every time we visit any of our countries on the continent.

Oh yes, Ghanaians are civil and polite to a fault. I first encountered this pleasant reality ages ago when I was still a student at the Dar es Salaam University involved in student politics and travelling to West Africa and elsewhere.

My meetings with colleagues at Legon and Kumasi were always a joy, from the warmth and camaraderie that the Kojos, Ofusus, Busias and Kantamakolos seemed to exude.

Over the years, after graduating, I went back to Ghana and took the temperature of the place, and it seemed not to have changed an iota, despite Ghana having gone through a turbulent political history and serious economic woes. The people have demonstrated remarkable resilience over time, and they have maintained a singular culture of generosity and hospitality.

You notice it right from the airport. To begin with, Ghana has had a policy dating back from the days of Kwame Nkrumah of being open to all Africans who come visiting.

Many African countries do not need visas, and those who need them can obtain them on arrival, and can stay for an initial three months without bother.

That goes to show in fact and deed that Ghana truly considers all Africans as brothers and sisters, a far cry from the empty platitudes mouthed by so many of our other rulers.

At the airport, it is not uncommon to find a security official who is eager to give you directions about where you want to go, or a policeman who will help you carry your luggage if it looks like it is too heavy for you. A taxi driver will look after your bags as you go to the forex bureau, even if you have told him that you will not use his services because someone is meeting you.

In the smaller towns, hamlets and villages, you may think it is obligatory to greet people you do not know, as everyone you meet will extend their salutations, and if you appear to not understand the local lingo, then they will subject you to an inquiry as to where you are from, how long you have been in Ghana, what your line of business is, and if you like it in Ghana.

Asking for directions when you are lost attracts volunteers who will even offer to accompany you halfway to where you are going, and if they only manage to lose you even further, at least they tried.

They still have an effective “lost and found” culture where tablets, cellphones and power banks will be returned to their owners. These are virtues I experienced in my young age; that they have survived to this day is testimony to the longevity of goodness in at least one place.

Our rulers across the continent have to render their account before this evidence. Ghana trumps their countries hands down. Several of our countries look like prison camps where every inmate is looking for ways to rip you off. The rest are only marginally better. Go to Ghana and learn how to behave.

Source*

Related Topics:

The Igbo’s Traditional View on the Sanctity of Life*

An Ancient African Faith based on obtaining God Consciousness!

Knowledge of Life*

New African Trade Agreement Gateway for Mass Recolonization*

The U.S. Elite Troops Partner with African Forces but Pursue U.S. Aims*

E.U. Bullies its Way through an Reciprocal Trade Access in Africa*

Thousands of Africans Rise Up Against Bill Gates*

Ghanaian Company Invests $9M in Failing Black Chicago Bank*

From Ghana Ebola as a Virus Does not Exist Except for Those Who Got Sick from the Shots*

Genetically Engineered Bt Cotton in Ghana: The hidden Agenda Exposed

E.U. Bullies its Way through an Reciprocal Trade Access in Africa*

E.U. Bullies its Way through an Reciprocal Trade Access in Africa*

By Cécile Barbière

Translated by Samuel White

Under the EPA, Kenya will have to open its market to European goods

 

The six African countries threatened with losing access to the European single market have finally agreed to sign the E.U’s Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs). But the continent’s regional integration may suffer as a result. EurActiv France reports.

Kenya’s parliament last Wednesday (21 September) ratified the European Union EPA, signalling the end of a drawn-out struggle between several African countries and the European Commission, over the future of their trade relations with the E.U.

In July, Brussels had upped the pressure on six African governments, threatening to suspend their single market access if they had not ratified the new agreements by 1 October.

Customs duties

Faced with a tax on their E.U. exports if they failed to cooperate, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Botswana, Namibia, Swaziland and Kenya all finally agreed to ratify their Economic Partnership Agreements, bringing the lengthy negotiation process to an end.

These EPAs replace the non-reciprocal trade agreements granted by the EU under the Cotonou agreement, signed in June 2000. The aim is to maintain the preferential access to the European market enjoyed by the African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) countries, in return for reduced customs duties for European exports.

But the balance of the new agreements has attracted criticism from certain African countries, as well as civil society organisations, which say the dice are weighted in favour of the EU. The loss of customs revenue, coupled with competition from European products arriving on less development markets, is a major cause for concern.

EU seals free trade deal with West Africa

 Negotiators from West Africa and the E.U. have put pen to paper on a €42 billion-a-year free trade deal after 10 years of haggling, but ongoing talks with East African states remain mired in fine print.

Integration in East Africa

Following the ratification by the Kenyan parliament, the Secretary of State for Foreign Trade, Adan Mohamed, said that if he had allowed the EU’s October ultimatum to pass, “[Kenyan] products would have become un-competitive on the European market, as they would have been taxed at 22%”.

Kenya is part of the region known to the E.U. as the East Africa Community (EAC), and would have been the only member of this trade zone to see EU customs barriers re-established if it refused to sign the EPA.

It is the only EAC country not under the “everything but arms” regime. Reserved for the least developed countries (LDCs), this beneficial trade regime offers toll-free access to the European market with no reciprocal demands.

The other members of the EAC (Tanzania, Uganda, Burundi and Rwanda), which do enjoy this preferential access, were never at risk of losing it.

Tanzania and Brexit

“For Tanzania, the ultimatum has never been an issue because the country is among the LDCs, so it has free access to the European market under the “everything but arms” regime,” a European Commission spokesperson said.

With guaranteed access to the single market, the country has little to gain from signing the EPA, which would oblige it to progressively open its own market to European products.

 “Tanzania cannot be forced to sign because it has LDC status, whereas for Kenya, the effect would have been immediate,” said Marc Maes, the head of European trade policy for the Coalition of the Flemish North South Movement.

And the country has so far refused to ratify the agreement. This is a threat to the region’s economic integration, as each East African country would be forced to come up with its own agreement with the E.U., instead of signing a single regional EPA.

Brexit is another concern for Tanzania. “75% of this country’s exports go to the United Kingdom, so Brexit calls into question the relevance of this EPA,” said Maes.

In 2000, the European Union and the countries of the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group of States (ACP group) signed the Cotonou agreement, which foresaw the negotiation of economic partnership agreements (EPAs), including reciprocal free trade from 2008.

Since then, the E.U. has been negotiating economic partnership agreements with the ACP group, to replace the Cotonou and Lomé agreements.

Under the terms of the agreement, the countries of the Global South were obliged to open their markets to most products from the European Union.

Only one such regional agreement has been signed so far, due to the strong reservations expressed by civil society organisations and states.

 Source*

Related Topics:

TPP, TPPA Goes EPA in the Recolonization of Africa*

The Case for Reparations to Africa: Britain Apology is Cheap*

New Colonial Carve-up of Africa? British firms vying for £1trn Natural Resources*

A.U Launches All-Africa Passport to Create a Borderless Continent*

Embedding Transnational Agribusiness and GMO’s into African Agriculture*

BRICS Under Attack: NWO Tentacles Extending into South Africa*

Offshore Firm Helped Billionaires Plunder Africa*

“U.S. Destroyed Libya to re-colonize Africa”*

Rothschild Billion Dollar Money Laundering Plot in Africa*

Hiding Africa’s Looted Funds and the Silence of Western Media*

African Women Organize to Reclaim Food Sovereignty*

WATCH: THE UTILIZATION OF WESTERN NGOS FOR THE THEFT OF AFRICA’S VAST RESOURCES

Why Apartheid Still Exists in South Africa*

Gates Foundation Gives Tulane U Millions to Curb African Population*

Ghanaian Company Invests $9M in Failing Black Chicago Bank*

Ghanaian Company Invests $9M in Failing Black Chicago Bank*

By Musah Idriss

Outgoing CEO Norman Williams, left, with new chairman Paa Kwesi Nduom. Image courtesy of ChicagoBusiness.com

A Ghanaian firm stepped in right on time as a Black-owned Bronzeville bank was on the verge of collapsing.

Groupe Nduom of Ghana invested a whopping $9M into the failing Illinois Service Federal Savings and Loan Association, now known as ISF Bank, Ghana Web reports. The bank was in search of capital to revive its struggling operations.

“Our mission is to be a viable, growing, community development financial services institution responding innovatively to our primarily underserved and minority constituency with customer service which ensures each customer feels they are our only customer,” the bank’s website reads.

The firm acquired ISF Bank in May, a representative from the financial institution told Atlanta Black Star.

According to Chicago Business, Groupe Nduom of Ghana operates out of West Africa and the United Kingdom, employing over 3,000 people. The firm’s businesses and social enterprises include entities in the tourism, financial services, media, cross border trade, and media industries.

Groupe Ndoum of Ghana recently acquired a Black-owned Illinois bank. Photo courtesy of GroupeNduom.com

 

Company president and chairman Dr. Papa Kwesi Ndoum called the ISF Bank acquisition a “major step for Africans,” pointing out the new opportunity for Ghanaians to start businesses in the Black community.

“In the Jewish community, they find a way to help each other, and they have moved on,” Ndoum explained at a town hall meeting of Africans and African-Americans in Chicago.

“The Chinese start with little and move on, and the Koreans also come here and move on,” he noted.

“So, we have this idea: What is it about African-Americans, Africans, specifically Ghanaians?…. The African has talent, the African-American has talent, the Ghanaian has talent; the problem is a lack of opportunity.”

The company president said he hoped the new acquisition would inspire Africans and African-Americans to work together for their mutual benefit, Ghana Web reports.

The firm presented an award to senior pastor of the Oasis Group of Churches, Rev. Dr. Isaac Paintsil, who was the first Ghanaian to open an account with the bank. Ebenezer Nsiah, president of the Ghana National Council, followed suit, pledging to withdraw $10,000 from the council’s current bank and deposit it into the ISF Bank.

“Our mission is to support businesses in the community, and this bank is a Ghanaian business,” Nsiah said. “If it is successful, it will have an impact on us. This is our opportunity to give support to Ghanaian businesses to be successful in Chicago.”

According to Atlanta Black Star, the Black bank has played a vital role in funding Black entrepreneurs, businesses and institutions, as well as sustaining the Black community and individuals in tough times. For example, the Freedman’s Savings and Trust company, established by Congress following the Civil War, was created to help newly emancipated Blacks.

Black-owned banks were also crucial during the Jim Crow era, as African-American communities across the country struggled to achieve economic growth and development, ABS reports. The Black community of Tulsa, Oklahoma, known as Black Wall Street, is one of few examples of African-American communities that achieved economic success.

Between 1888 and 1934, there were over 130 Black-owned banks in the U.S., according to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. That number plummeted to 48 in 2001, with only 22 remaining today.

Noting past efforts to form partnerships that would foster progress for Black people, activist and president of the Metro Area Black Trade Council, Rev. Dr. Al Sampson, called for renewed efforts to create businesses and organizations that link African-Americans, Ghana Web reports.

The longtime reverend likened the new bank’s efforts to link Africans and African-Americans to the 1957 meeting between Martin Luther King Jr. and first president of Ghana Dr. Kwame Nkrumah.

According to Joy Online, ISF’s former Chairman and CEO, Norman J. Williams, happily welcomed the bank’s new proprietors.

“This marks a new chapter in the life of the bank, which will enable it to sustain the rigors of financial stress that have plagued many communities in Chicago and continue to provide much-needed banking services and access to credit,” Williams said. “Given the current climate in our country, the bank is needed more than ever to provide financial services and drive redevelopment in our market.”

According to the bank’s website, the new main office is located at 4619 S. King Drive Chicago, IL 60653.

Source*

Related Topics:

Black Wall Street*

Muslim Charities Are Helping To Raise Money for Burned Black Churches In The US*

Toyota to Pay Over $20mn Settlement for Charging Black and Asian Customers More Interest for Car Loans*

Black Entertainers Raise over $100,000 in #JusticeForFlint, an Oscars Alternative*

In a Broke and Crumbling City, this Woman is Building her Urban Paradise*

Dear White People – an Open Letter*

Arrested and Held in Psych Ward Because Cops Didn’t Believe as a Black Woman She Owns BMW*

South Africa Delays Court Decision on Black Ownership of Mines*

From Black Man’s Burden to African Renaissance*

Embedding Transnational Agribusiness and GMO’s into African Agriculture*

Embedding Transnational Agribusiness and GMO’s into African Agriculture*

Scramble for AfricaBy André Vltchek

The African Centre for Biodiversity (ACB) has just released the report For your own good!, which outlines the GMO industry’s expansion across Africa. The report focuses on non-commercial traditional crops, such as cassava, sorghum, sweet potato, pigeon pea, cowpea, banana and rice, which corporations are attempting to genetically modify and roll out under the guise of philanthropy.

The report reveals that a great deal of research and development is currently underway into the genetic modification (GM) of these crops. Most of the on-going trials concentrate on drought and salt tolerance, nitrogen use efficiency, resistance to tropical pests and diseases and nutritional enhancement (bio-fortification). The key countries that have been targeted include Burkina Faso, Egypt, Ghana, Nigeria, Kenya, Uganda and Malawi.

The genesis of GM research into these crops can be found in royalty-free donations of various patented GM traits by several transnational companies to experimental programmes undertaken by African scientists employed by government ministries. These companies include Monsanto, Dupont and Pioneer Hi-bred.

Mariam Mayet, Director of the ACB, says:

“This indicates that the GM industry, under the veil of technology donations and public financing, is effectively managing to make further inroads into imposing GM on the African continent. By focusing the research on traits meant to ‘benefit’ farmers and malnourished populations, through inter alia, bio-fortification, the industry is intent on giving a humanitarian face to the real involvement, vested interests and expanding influence of these MNCs in African agriculture”.

The main players involved include the African Agriculture Technology Foundation (AATF), which is on the receiving end of many of the technological property rights donations, the Agricultural Biotechnology Support Program (ABSP) and the Program for Biosafety Systems (PBS). The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) and USAID fund the latter organisations.

U.S-based research institutions such as the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center (DDPSC) (for cassava) and universities (notably Michigan State University and Kansas State University) play a major role in this ‘philanthropic’ research.

The ACB report notes there is a dearth of literature that critically addresses bio-safety issues and socio-economic aspects relating to the bio-fortification of indigenous crops through GM. According to the authors, this is especially important given the need to move away from an over-emphasis on food fortification strategies towards a permanent solution: diet diversification through locally available foods, which was recognised as early as 1992 by the U.N. International Conference on Nutrition.

As is the case with the controversial Golden Rice research and development project, the report argues these GM projects are diverting financial and human resources and policies and practices away from implementing the real solutions that can be found within the diversity of natural foods and farming.

Zakiyya Ismail, Consumer Campaigner with the ACB argues:

“The real solutions to address vitamin and mineral deficiencies can be found in ecological farming systems, and traditional kitchen and home gardens, which can better contribute to healthy and diverse diets and empower people to access and produce their own healthy and varied food.”

ACB stresses that smallholder farmers must be given the right to choose their means of production and survival. It adds even if gene sequences and constructs are donated, the accompanying requisite GM inputs will be expensive for farmers. GM crops are highly likely to increase the costs of production for farmers and lead them into indebtedness and dependency.

The report by ACB follows a Global Justice Now report that outlines the role of BMFG in spearheading a drive into Africa on behalf of ‘corporate America’ to facilitate a GMO/green revolution.

With assets of $43.5 billion, BMGF is the largest charitable foundation in the world and distributes more aid for global health than any government. Its strategy is intended to deepen the role of multinational companies, even though these corporations are responsible for much of the poverty and injustice that already plagues the Global South. The foundation’s programmes have a specific ideological strategy that promotes neo-liberal economic policies, corporate globalisation, GMOs and an outdated (colonialist) view of role of aid in ‘helping’ the poor.

Global Justice Now shows that the senior staff of BMGF’s programmes are overwhelmingly drawn from ‘corporate America’. As a result, the question is: whose interests are being promoted – those of corporate America or those of ordinary people who seek social and economic justice rather than charity?

Hardly a dyed-in-the-wool Marxist, Peter Buffet is the son of the billionaire investor Warren Buffet. He recently argued that philanthropy only serves to end up perpetuating systems of oppression.

Writing in the NewYork Times, Buffett criticised “philanthropic colonialism,” where rich people get involved with issues they understand very little about. In the meantime, the wealthy get to feel good for “solving” the problems that they or the system they benefitted from caused in the first place.

Buffet wrote:

As more lives and communities are destroyed by the system that creates vast amounts of wealth for the few, the more heroic it sounds to “give back.” It’s what I would call “conscience laundering” — feeling better about accumulating more than any one person could possibly need to live on by sprinkling a little around as an act of charity.”

He went on to say that this just keeps the existing structure of inequality in place:

“Nearly every time someone feels better by doing good, on the other side of the world (or street), someone else is further locked into a system that will not allow the true flourishing of his or her nature or the opportunity to live a joyful and fulfilled life.”

Conscience laundering may be all well and good for individuals, but corporations are legally obliged to maximise profits for their shareholders, and ‘philanthropy’ can be regarded as part of a long-term strategy. Getting GMOs into Africa by any means makes hard-headed business sense.

And as if to underline this, according to ACB, it is highly likely that GM varieties will be subject to plant breeders’ rights and GM certified seed will be sold to farmers by local seed companies who will expect a profit or royalty payments from farmers. This scenario is of vital importance because the traditional crops in question are the common heritage of African farmers and often the last defence against hunger in poor communities.

Mariam Mayet concludes:

“There is no such thing as a free lunch for African farmers. And to add insult to injury, these farmers will be precluded from saving any farm-saved propagating material. In this way, they will be expected to give away their age old farmers’ rights to freely re-use, exchange and sell seed and propagating materials in their farming and seed systems.”

The ‘philanthropy’ currently being dished out in Africa does not empower local farmers but is aimed at getting GMOs (with all of the associated problems) into agriculture, sucking farmers into the prevailing power structures of U.S. capitalism and marginalising credible, alternative based on self-sufficiency, sustainability and sound ecological practices.

Source*

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5 Million Nigerians Urge Government to Reject Monsanto Crops*

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Gates and Friends to Meet Privately on how they can Profit from African Seeds*

GMOs Set to Crush Export Markets for Farmers across Ghana*

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GMOs Set to Crush Export Markets for Farmers across Ghana*

Ghanaians have been fighting attempts at the imposition of genetically modified organisms (GMOs), by the Biotech industry and The Gates Foundation into their food system for the last few years, including by taking the Government to Court on the issue.

By Ali-Masmadi Jehu-Appiah

The public GMO debate has mainly focused on health and the environment, but hardly ever on the socio-economic impacts of GMOs. The socio-economic ramifications of the imposition of GMOs alone ought to be enough to ban its use in Ghana. The creeping intrusions of GMOs into Ghana’s economy, is likely to increase poverty, rather than diminish it; by increasing the penetration of transnational corporations into Ghana’s agriculture thus decreasing profit margins for small local farmers. Ghanaian agriculture cannot afford an economy that is designed for the benefit of external interests at the expense of Ghanaians.

The Ghana Export Promotion Authority (GEPA) has already warned of detrimental consequences on Ghana’s non-traditional exports (NTEs) should the country adopt genetically modified organisms (GMOs) into crops grown locally. The issues which GEPA raised included the health and other risk concerns regarding GMOs across Europe where the bulk of Ghana’s NTEs are exported to and new concerns amongst consumers in the United States, which are affecting sales of GMOs and pushing consumer preference to non-GMO foods.

“The potential economic harm would be incalculable if Ghana were to be labelled a GMO haven exporting GM crops to the world,” the Chief Executive Officer of the GEPA, Mr Gideon Qaurcoo, said in a statement published in the Daily Graphic. The report explained that in view of  overwhelming evidence from the E.U. and Western world’s attitude to GM foods, it would be detrimental for Ghana to introduce GMOs into its crop production as many products would stand the risk of being rejected by important export markets thus hugely damaging Ghana’s economy.

Exports of Agricultural products (WTO AoA) from Ghana to Europe, in 2014 alone stood at € 1335 million Many large E.U. supermarkets are turning anti-GMO, including the biggest – REWE in Germany. Reports coming from the U.S. claim organic food sales have doubled since 2007 to $36 billion in 2014. U.S. sales of foods verified as non-GMO have tripled since 2013 to $15 billion.

Surging U.S. demand for organic food — which is not GMO and is also free of synthetic pesticides and fertilizers — kept values for organic feed corn and soybeans aloft even while prices for conventional crops plummeted. Agricultural commodities traders catch the natural foods bug . This is also happening in many parts of the world today. Quite recently, on December 9, 2015, a Thai newspaper published an editorial in which it stated:

“We have already witnessed Japan’s rejection of papaya shipments from Thailand because the fruit was “contaminated” with GMOs. Thai farmers naturally fear that their own crops might go unsold if GMO use spreads with the government’s blessing. The supposed ‘benefits’ of using GMOs amount to little if customers shun the produce when it arrives on shelves. Wider use of GMOs would also affect organic farmers – pioneers in a potentially lucrative export market – due to the possibility of airborne spores infecting their carefully nurtured crops”

If Ghanaian authorities really want to help the poor Ghanaian farmer, there is no better time to follow the IAASTD report which recommends low-input, sustainable small-holder model of farming. A U.N. Report even goes as far as saying “Small-Scale Organic Farming Only Way To Feed The World” . We can easily establish ourselves as a veritable source of organic foods. GEPA has been at the forefront of promoting and developing the country’s non-traditional exports, including processed and semi-processed agricultural products, handicrafts and services. It is saying the same thing.

Through its efforts, “earnings from NTEs increased from US$1.164 billion in 2007 to US$2.364 billion in 2012, with a target to reach US$ 5 billion in 2017″.The market for organic foods is already growing. Ghana stands a good chance of making a reputation for itself and developing the ever expanding market for healthy sustainable food. It was great to see Ghana making its maiden appearance at the 2015 Middle East Natural and Organic Products Expo (MENOPE) in Dubai. The Ghanaian companies showcased products such as shea butter, dry fruits, coconut oil, morning tea, hibiscus tea, natural cocoa powder and honey.”

The struggle against GMOs in Ghana is currently at its most intense level since the beginning of the campaign led by Food Sovereignty Ghana in 2013. According to statistics emerging from the GM-lobby itself,

“an overwhelming number of Ghanaians do not want to have anything to do with GMOs. We have heard of a research by J. N. Buah on the Perception of GM Foods in Ghana, in which “80% of ordinary Ghanaians who responded to a survey, and 90% of government workers at the ministries indicated their total rejection of GM foods.”

Source*

Related Topics:

Monsanto to Go on Trial for Crimes against Humanity in The Hague*

ALERT ON SEED LAW IN VENEZUELA

Ghana’s Government Sued over “Illegal” GM Crops Policy*

Sudan Seizes “Anonymous ” GM Soybean Shipment*

Is South Africa Waking Up to the Innate Poison of GM Technology?*

Monsanto Reports $156 Million Loss in Q4 as Farmers Abandon GM Crops*

What S. Australia did to Increase Crop Yield by 300% without GMO’s!*

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The History of Monsanto