Tag Archive | Honduras

Honduras Resists U.N. Pressure to Legalize Abortion*

Honduras Resists U.N. Pressure to Legalize Abortion*

Pro-Life protest in Tegucigalpa, Honduras.

 

Last week, Honduran lawmakers resisted significant pressure from the United Nations, the European Union, and pro-abortion nongovernmental organizations to legalize abortion.

A proposal seeking to legalize abortion in cases of rape, fetal disability, and risks to life of the mother was initiated by foreign independent advisors from Spain contracted by the Honduran government to help lawmakers revise the nation’s Penal Code. The proposal came as the Honduran National Congress undertakes the first major comprehensive revision of the Penal Code since 1983.

In response, thousands of pro-life Hondurans took to the streets of Tegucigalpa, the nation’s capital, to protest the proposed change to the country’s abortion law.

“Honduras faced brutal pressure from the international community to depenalize abortion,” says Martha Lorena Alvarado of Provida Honduras.

“Pro-lifers, the young people, religious people both Catholic and Evangelical responded immediately, the outpouring of support was tremendous,” Alvarado says,

“we reacted as a pro-life country and as a result our nation’s laws continue to defend the life of the unborn child from the moment of conception.”

Honduras is an overwhelmingly pro-life country. According to a recent Pew Research Center poll, 71% of Hondurans believe that abortion should be illegal in all circumstances. Currently, Honduran law protects all unborn life at any moment during pregnancy without exceptions.

“Let’s save the family” – Pro-Lifers in Tegucigalpa, Honduras protest a proposal in the National Congress to legalize abortion.

 

Lawmakers in the National Congress decisively rejected the abortion proposal. In the legislative assembly, 77 lawmakers voted in favor of article 169 of the new Penal Code which retains the nation’s abortion law without loosening any of the restrictions currently in place. Five lawmakers voted against the measure while eight members abstained. Lawmakers further rebuffed efforts to legalize the morning-after pill.

“It was a complete defeat for them,” according to Alvarado.

Pro-abortion activists, however, had perceived the occasion as an opportunity to push for the legalization of abortion. In an attempt to win over public opinion, pro-abortion allies rushed to finance numerous television and radio advertisements that aired across the country in the days leading up to last week’s vote.

Pro-abortion NGOs including U.K.-based Amnesty International, and the U.S.-based Center for Reproductive Rights also weighed in in the hopes of swaying lawmakers.

“By criminalizing abortion, the Honduran Penal Code is incompatible with human rights standards and must be modified without delay,” Erika Guevara-Rosas, the Americas Director for Amnesty International said on the organization’s website.

A number of parliamentarians from Spain, Sweden, Finland, Slovenia, and Belgium in the EU’s European Parliament also sent a letter to leaders in the Honduran National Congress last week, strongly urging lawmakers to legalize abortion to accord with purported international human rights standards.

A group of United Nations human rights experts also condemned Honduras for its laws in defense of life, threatening the Central American nation with failing to heed recent recommendations handed down by U.N. treaty bodies:

“We sincerely hope that the Honduran Congress will seize this key opportunity to comply with its obligations to eliminating discrimination against women in its legislation…we regret that the criminalisation of abortion is maintained in the bill as a serious offence despite recommendations from the U.N.’s Universal Periodic Review and the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women as well as the Committee against Torture.”

Honduras, as state party to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, and to the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment and its optional protocol, is bound by the provisions of these UN treaties. However, neither of these treaties mention abortion, let alone any purported human right standard to legalize abortion.

The Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) and the Committee against Torture (CAT) are charged with monitoring the implementation of these treaties respectively.

CEDAW concluding observations from periodic review last fall had condemned Honduras for its pro-life laws, urging Honduras to come into compliance with

“circumstances under which abortion must be decriminalized, namely, at least in cases of rape or incest, threats to the life and/or health of the woman, and severe foetal impairment.”

CEDAW based its recommendation on a statement on reproductive health at the committee’s 57th Session. Recommendations issued by treaty bodies, like CEDAW, however, are non-binding on state parties.

Despite claims that failing to legalize abortion is contrary to international human rights standards, no U.N. treaty compels any country to legalize abortion. On the contrary, the Program of Action of the U.N. International Conference on Population and Development in Cairo in 1994, a landmark non-binding international agreement on population and development assistance, asserts that the decision of whether or not to legalize abortion should lie solely in the legislative processes in sovereign states.

Furthermore, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights expresses the international consensus that all people have the right to life, liberty, and security of person.

“It is reprehensible that U.N. human rights experts have turned human rights on its head, using the stature of their office to attack, rather than to defend, the universal right to life for the most defenseless among us,” says Population Research Institute President Steven Mosher,

“we need to continue to work to cut public funding from all entities, groups and individuals who engage in this kind of cultural imperialism.”

Source*

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World Bank Declares itself Above the Law*

World Bank Declares itself Above the Law*

By Pete Dolack

The World Bank has for decades left a trail of human misery. Destruction of the environment, massive human rights abuses and mass displacement have been ignored in the name of “development” that works to intensify neoliberal inequality. In response to legal attempts to hold it to account, the World Bank has declared itself above the law.

At least one U.S. trial court has already agreed that the bank can’t be touched, and thus the latest lawsuit filed against it, attempting to obtain some measure of justice for displaced Honduran farmers, faces a steep challenge. Regardless of the ultimate outcome of legal proceedings, however, millions of people around the world have paid horrific prices for the relentless pursuit of profit.

A trail of evictions, displacements, gross human rights violations (including rape, murder and torture), widespread destruction of forests, financing of greenhouse-gas-belching fossil-fuel projects, and destruction of water and food sources has followed the World Bank.

The latest attempt at accountability is a lawsuit filed in the U.S. federal court in Washington by EarthRights International, a human rights and environmental non-governmental organization, charging that the World Bank has turned a blind eye to systematic abuses associated with palm-oil plantations in Honduras that it has financed. The lawsuit, Juana Doe v. International Finance Corporation, alleges that,

“Since the mid-1990s, the International Finance Corporation [a division of the World Bank] has invested millions of dollars in Honduran palm-oil companies owned by the late Miguel Facussé. Those companies — which exist today as Dinant — have been at the center of a decades-long and bloody land-grabbing campaign in the Bajo Aguán region of Honduras.

For nearly two decades, farmer cooperatives have challenged Dinant’s claims to sixteen palm-oil plantations … that it has held in the Bajo Aguán region. On information and belief, Dinant’s former owner, Miguel Facussé, took that land from the farmer cooperatives through fraud, coercion, and actual or threatened violence. The farmer cooperatives have engaged in lawsuits, political advocacy, and peaceful protests to challenge Dinant’s control and use of the land. And Dinant has responded to such efforts with violence and aggression.”

Bank’s own staff cites failures

EarthRights International alleges that the World Bank has “repeatedly and consistently provided critical funding to Dinant, knowing that Dinant was waging a campaign of violence, terror, and dispossession against farmers, and that their money would be used to aid the commission of gross human rights abuses.” The lawsuit filing cites “U.S. government sources” to allege that more than 100 farmers have been killed since 2009.

The suit also says that the International Finance Corporation’s own ombudsman said the World Bank division “failed to spot or deliberately ignored the serious social, political and human rights context.” These failures arose “from staff incentives ‘to overlook, fail to articulate, or even conceal potential environmental, social and conflict risk’ and ‘to get money out the door.’ ” Despite this internal report, the suit says, the World Bank continued to provide financing and that the ombudsman has “no authority to remedy abuses.”

(World Bank representatives did not respond to a request for comment. Although not directly a party to the lawsuit, Dinant describes the allegations as “absurd.” In a statement on its web site, the company said “All allegations that Dinant is — or ever has been — engaged in systematic violence against members of the community are without foundation.”)

EarthRights International’s lawsuit faces an uphill challenge due to an earlier suit filed by it on behalf of Indian farmers and fisher-people being thrown out by the same court when it ruled that the World Bank is immune from legal challenge. The bank provided $450 million for a power plant that the plaintiffs said degraded the environment and destroyed livelihoods. The court agreed with the World Bank’s contention that it has immunity under the International Organizations Immunities Act. (The dismissal has been appealed.)

The International Organizations Immunities Act provides that “International organizations, their property and their assets, wherever located, and by whomsoever held, shall enjoy the same immunity from suit and every form of judicial process as is enjoyed by foreign governments.” The World Bank has been declared the equivalent of a sovereign state, and in this context is placed above any law as if it possesses diplomatic immunity.

This law is applied selectively; lawsuits against Cuba are not only allowed but consistently won by plaintiffs. These are not necessarily the strongest of cases, such as participants in the Bay of Pigs invasion winning judgments and a woman who was married to a Cuban who went back to Cuba winning $27 million because the court found that her marriage made her a “victim of terrorism”!

More than 3 million people displaced

Despite its immunity, a passport may not be needed to enter a World Bank office, but can it be argued that the lending organization uses its immense power wisely? That would be a very difficult case to make.

A 2015 report by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists found that 3.4 million people were physically or economically displaced by projects funded by the World Bank. Land was taken, people were forced from their homes and their livelihoods damaged. Some of the other findings of the report, on which more than 50 journalists from 21 countries worked:

  • From 2009 to 2013, the World Bank pumped $50 billion into projects graded the highest risk for “irreversible or unprecedented” social or environmental impacts — more than twice as much as the previous five-year span.
  • The bank regularly fails to live up to its own policies that purport to protect people harmed by projects it finances.
  • The World Bank and its International Finance Corporation lending arm have financed governments and companies accused of human rights violations such as rape, murder and torture. In some cases, they continued to bankroll these borrowers after evidence of abuses emerged.
  • Ethiopian authorities diverted millions of dollars from a World Bank-supported project to fund a violent campaign of mass evictions, according to former officials who carried out the forced resettlement program.

One of the articles that is a part of this investigative report said the bank routinely ignores its own rules that require detailed resettlement plans and that employees face strong pressure to approve big infrastructure projects. The report says:

“The World Bank often neglects to properly review projects ahead of time to make sure communities are protected, and frequently has no idea what happens to people after they are removed. In many cases, it has continued to do business with governments that have abused their citizens, sending a signal that borrowers have little to fear if they violate the bank’s rules, according to current and former bank employees.

‘There was often no intent on the part of the governments to comply — and there was often no intent on the part of the bank’s management to enforce,’ said Navin Rai, a former World Bank official who oversaw the bank’s protections for indigenous peoples from 2000 to 2012. ‘That was how the game was played.’ …

Current and former bank employees say the work of enforcing these standards has often been undercut by internal pressures to win approval for big, splashy projects. Many bank managers, insiders say, define success by the number of deals they fund. They often push back against requirements that add complications and costs.”

Funding that facilitates global warming

Incredibly, one of the outcomes of the Paris Climate Summit was for leaders of the G7 countries to issue a communiqué that they would seek to raise funds “from private investors, development finance institutions and multilateral development banks.” These leaders propose the World Bank be used to fight global warming despite it being a major contributor to projects that increase greenhouse-gas emissions, including providing billions of dollars to finance new coal plants around the world. The bank even had the monumental hypocrisy to issue a report in 2012 that called for slowing global warming while ignoring its own role.

It is hoped you, dear reader, won’t fall off your chair in shock, but the World Bank’s role in facilitating global warming has since only increased.

Financing projects that facilitate global warming had already been on the rise. A study prepared by the Institute for Policy Studies and four other organizations found that World Bank lending for coal, oil and gas reached $3 billion in 2008 — a sixfold increase from 2004. In the same year, only $476 million went toward renewable energy sources. Oil Change International (citing somewhat lower dollar figures) estimates that World Bank funding for fossil fuels doubled from 2011 to 2015.

Destructive logging projects across the Global South funded by the World Bank accelerated in the 1990s. Despite a January 2000 internal report finding that its lending practices had not curbed deforestation or reduced poverty, Southeast Asia saw a continuation of illegal logging and land concessions, and untimely deaths of local people blowing the whistle, as has Africa.

Similar to its report on curbing global warming that ignores its own role, the World Bank shamelessly issued a 2012 report calling for international law enforcement measures against illegal logging. Perhaps what is illegal are only those operations not funded by the bank?

Loans to pay debt create more debt, repeat

Ideology plays a critical role here. International lending organizations, such as the World Bank and International Monetary Fund, consistently impose austerity. The IMF’s loans, earmarked for loans to governments to pay debts or stabilize currencies, always come with the same requirements to privatize public assets (which can be sold far below market value to multi-national corporations waiting to pounce); cut social safety nets; drastically reduce the scope of government services; eliminate regulations; and open economies wide to multi-national capital, even if that means the destruction of local industry and agriculture. This results in more debt, which then gives multi-national corporations and the IMF, which enforces those corporate interests, still more leverage to impose more control, including heightened ability to weaken environmental and labor laws.

The World Bank compliments this by funding massive infrastructure projects that tend to enormously profit deep-pocketed international investors but ignore the effects on local people and the environment.

The World Bank employs a large contingent of scientists and technicians, which give it a veneer of authority as it pursues a policy of relentless corporate plunder. Noting that the bank possesses “an enormous research and knowledge generation capacity,” The environmental and social-justice organization ASEED Europe reports:

“The World Bank is the institution with one of the largest research budgets globally and has no rival in the field of development economics. … A number of researchers and scholars have questioned the reliability of the World Bank-commissioned research. Alice Amsdem, a top scholar on East Asian economies, argues that since the World Bank continually fails to scientifically prove its conclusions, its policy justifications are ‘quintessentially political and ideological.’ Regarding the World Development Report (WDR) series, for example, Nicholas Stern, an Oxford professor in economics and former World Bank chief economist says that many of the numbers used by the Bank come from highly dubious sources, or have been constructed in ways which leaves one sceptical as to whether they can be helpfully applied.” (citations omitted)

Capitalist ideology rests on the concept of “markets” being so efficient that they should be allowed to work without human intervention. But what is a market? Under capitalism, it is nothing more than the aggregate interests of the most powerful and largest financiers and industrialists. No wonder that “markets” “decide” that neoliberal austerity must be ruthlessly imposed — it is those at the top of vast corporate institutions who benefit from the decisions that the World Bank, and similar institutions, consistently make.

Markets do not sit in the clouds, beyond human control, as some perfect mechanism. They impose the will of those with the most who can not ever have enough. Markets are not ordained by some higher power — everything of human creation can be undone by human hands. Our current world system is no exception.

Source*

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Honduras: Paradise in Peril

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The World Bank’s Identification for Development*

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The World Bank and Money Laundering

 

Honduran Farmers Sue World Bank for Lending Arms for ‘Profiting From Murder’*

Honduran Farmers Sue World Bank for Lending Arms for ‘Profiting From Murder’*

A private lending arm of the World Bank is not ‘ending poverty,’ it is ‘ending the lives of the poor,’ says one farmer

 

By Nika Knight

Members of the Unified Campesinos Movement of the Aguán Valley (MUCA) carry mock coffins bearing photos of murdered relatives during a 2012 march against the ongoing violence in the Bajo Aguán valley. (Photo: AFP)

Honduran farmers on Wednesday filed a lawsuit against a branch of the World Bank for funding a massive palm oil corporation that the suit alleges has been responsible for the killings of over 100 farmers, as well as torture, violent assaults, and “other acts of aggression.”

The World Bank has “knowingly profited from the financing of murder,” argues the lawsuit filed in a federal court in Washington, D.C.

We have lost our compañeros, they have left our children without fathers, it’s been difficult to move forward, we live from our families and our land and now we are left with nothing,” said one of the farmers, according to EarthRights International (ERI), the nonprofit which filed the suit on the farmers’ behalf.

All the farmers named in the suit were protected by the pseudonyms Juan Doe and Juana Doe, to shield them from retaliation on the part of the palm oil company, Dinant.

“We want justice and the ability to raise our children again,” the farmer added.

“We have to move forward.” The suit is requesting damages for specific deaths.

The suit alleges that the “International Financial Corporation (IFC), the World Bank Group’s private lending arm, together with an IFC financial intermediary, the IFC Asset Management Corporation, have provided millions of dollars in financing to Dinant, even though, at the time, there were widespread allegations that Dinant employed hit men, military forces, and private security guards to intimidate and kill local farmers who claim Dinant’s owner stole their land decades prior,” ERI wrote in a statement.

The rights advocacy organization continued:

The IFC (with U.S. taxpayer money) and IFC-AMC knowingly financed Dinant’s campaign of terror and dispossession against Honduran farmers. The IFC’s own internal watchdog, the Office of the Compliance Advisor/Ombudsman (CAO), found that IFC failed to adhere to its own policies to protect local communities, and continued to allow the company to breach those safeguards and either failed to spot or deliberately ignored the serious social, political and human rights context in which this company is operating.

The result was an explosion of extreme violence by public and private security forces against the farmers, their movement leaders, and lawyers representing them. Over 100 farmers have been killed since November 2009 when the IFC disbursed the first half of a $30 million loan to Dinant; and the number of killings continues to grow today. So too has IFC’s support for Dinant; even after the IFC’s internal watchdog scolded the IFC for the 2009 loan, the IFC continued supporting Dinant via an opaque system of financial intermediaries, including the IFC-AMC and the Honduran bank, Ficohsa.

The suit claims that the purpose of the systemic violence is to “intimidate farmers from asserting competing rights to land that Dinant has sought to control.”

“The horrendous spate of violence that followed the IFC’s loan to Dinant is probably one of the most severe instances of corporate-related human rights abuse and financier negligence in the past decade,” said one ERI lawyer, also unnamed because of security concerns.

Another Honduran farmer quoted by ERI described the horrific violence:

“The police pulled people out of their houses. Military, police, and guards. We saw they were beating people including kids, so we were yelling, ‘Don’t hit the people!’ One bullet hit me, it still affects my breathing. I didn’t realize I’d been shot, but I touched it and saw blood. Another person was shot through the stomach.”

“Every day I am scared, but this is how life has become,” said a different farmer.

“At the end of the attack against me, the guards and military told me that they know where I live and that they will come to get me if I file a complaint against them.”

ERI argues: “While the IFC boasts of its mission to ‘end extreme poverty by 2030 and boost prosperity in every developing country,’ the IFC has knowingly entered one of the world’s most persistent and abusive land conflicts on the side of Dinant, a primary author of poverty and violence in Honduras. In the words of one farmer in the Bajo Aguán, the IFC is not ‘ending poverty;’ it is ‘ending the lives of the poor.'”

“The IFC clearly cannot police itself and it should no longer be allowed to hide behind a veil of immunity,” an ERI lawyer said. “The courts of the United States must be open to hear this case because nobody—not individuals, not corporations, not governments, and not the IFC—can get away with aiding these human rights abuses.”

Honduras is one of the most dangerous countries in the world for land and rights defenders. In 2016 alone, multiple Indigenous activists—including Berta Cáceres, who won the Goldman Environmental Prize for her work—were killed.

Source*

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Israel’s Role in Guatemala’s Dirty War*

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The World Bank’s Identification for Development*

The Strange Death of Dr. Sebi the Man Who Cures AIDS, Cancer, Diabetes

The Strange Death of Dr. Sebi the Man Who Cures AIDS, Cancer, Diabetes

Meet Dr. Sebi, a pathologist, biochemist and herbalist who died 06th August while imprisoned in Honduras. He was 82 years old.

The Man who Beat the FDA because he really could cure all those diseases…

My life with Dr. Sebi

https://drsebiscellfood.com/ 

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The Doctor Who Prescribes Fruit and Veg. Instead of Drugs*

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Western Medicine Is Rockefeller Medicine*

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Black and Afro-Indigenous Farmers Will Share 2015 Food Sovereignty Prize*

Black and Afro-Indigenous Farmers Will Share 2015 Food Sovereignty Prize*

By Lisa Griffith

In this moment when it is vital to assert that Black lives matter, the U.S. Food Sovereignty Alliance honours Black and Afro-Indigenous farmers, fishermen, and stewards of ancestral lands and water. We especially honour them as a vital part of food chain workers, who together are creating food sovereignty, meaning a world with healthy, ecologically produced food, and democratic control over food systems.

In 2015, the U.S. Food Sovereignty Alliance’s two prize winners are the Federation of Southern Cooperatives in the U.S., and the Black Fraternal Organization of Honduras. The prizes will be presented in Des Moines on October 14, 2015.

The Federation of Southern Cooperatives strengthens a vital piece of food sovereignty: helping keep lands in the hands of family farmers, in this case primarily African-American ones. The Federation was born in 1967 out of the civil rights movement. Its members are farmers in 16 Southern states, approximately 90% of them African-American, but also Native American, Latino, and White.

The Federation’s work is today more important than ever, given that African-American-owned farms in the US have fallen from 14% to 1% in less than 100 years. To help keep farms Black- and family-owned instead of corporate-owned, the Federation promotes land-based cooperatives; provides training in sustainable agriculture and forestry, management, and marketing; and advocates to the courts and to state and national legislatures.

Ben Burkett, co-founder of the Federation of Southern Cooperatives and Mississippi farmer, said,

“Our view is local production for local consumption. It’s just supporting mankind as family farmers. Everything we’re about is food sovereignty, the right of every individual on earth to wholesome food, clean water, clean air, clean land, and the self-determination of a local community to grow and do what they want. We just recognize the natural flow of life. It’s what we’ve always done.”

The Honduran Garifuna Community combines small scale farming and fishing.

The Black Fraternal Organization of Honduras (OFRANEH) was created in 1979 to protect the economic, social, and cultural rights of 46 Garifuna communities along the Atlantic coast of Honduras. At once Afro-descendent and indigenous, the Garifuna people are connected to both the land and the sea, and sustain themselves through farming and fishing. Land grabs for agrofuels (African palm plantations), tourist-resort development, and narco-trafficking seriously threaten their way of life, as do rising sea levels and the increased frequency and severity of storms due to climate change.

The Garifuna, who have already survived slavery and colonialism, are now defending and strengthening their land security and their sustainable, small-scale farming and fishing. OFRANEH brings together communities to meet these challenges head-on through direct-action community organizing, national and international legal action, promotion of Garifuna culture, and movement-building. In its work, OFRANEH especially prioritizes the leadership development of women and youth.

Coordinator Miriam Miranda said, “Our liberation starts because we can plant what we eat. This is food sovereignty. We need to produce to bring autonomy and the sovereignty of our peoples. If we continue to consume [only], it doesn’t matter how much we shout and protest. We need to become producers. It’s about touching the pocketbook, the surest way to overcome our enemies. It’s also about recovering and reaffirming our connections to the soil, to our communities, to our land.”

The Food Sovereignty Prize will be awarded on the evening of October 14 in Des Moines, IA, at the Historical Building. The Food Sovereignty Prize challenges the view that simply producing more through industrial agriculture and aquaculture will end hunger or reduce suffering. The world currently produces more than enough food, but imbalanced access to wealth means inadequate access to food. Real solutions protect the rights to land, seeds and water of family farmers and indigenous communities worldwide and promote sustainable agriculture through agro-ecology.

The USFSA represents a network of food producers and labour, environmental, faith-based, social justice and anti-hunger advocacy organizations. Additional supporters of the 2015 Food Sovereignty Prize include Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement, the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom, Grassroots International, and the Small Planet Fund.

Source*

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Honduras: Paradise in Peril

Beating the Drums of Resistance

Honduras: Paradise in Peril

The Río Platáno Biosphere Reserve, Honduras – home to the highest level of tropical biodiversity in Central America, homeland of the Pech and Miskito Indians, and keeper of hundreds of unexplored archeological sites – is in danger. Non-indians are invading the Reserve from all sides, poaching endangered wildlife and fish, slashing and burning ancient forests to sow pastures, and forcing indigenous inhabitants off their ancestral lands. Paradise in Peril follows an expedition organized to document the destruction of this UNESCO World Heritage Site and collect testimony from the native peoples who rely on the Río Platáno for survival.

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Teachers Being Jailed in Honduras

Teachers Being Jailed in Honduras

From: Honduras Solidarity Network

 

Urgent Appeal: Day of Action for Honduras – March 30th

  • “One Teacher Dead – Twenty teachers jailed for “sedition” and ‘illicit protests’. Teachers threatened with mass firings for their national strike against the repression and attacks.”
  • “Journalists attacked by police – Cameraman in hospital after police deliberately fire tear gas bomb at his face”
  • “Massive use of tear gas and beatings send teachers, students, and bystanders, including small children to the hospital”

This is the news from Honduras after a week of protests against the Lobo regime’s human rights violations, attacks against the unions, and plans to privatize education and public services. The army and police have forcibly occupied the National University and repeatedly assaulted the offices of the teachers’ unions. Peaceful protest marches have been violently attacked; many hundreds of tear gas bombs have been fired; one teacher has been killed in the protests, and many persons detained.  At the same time the harassment and paramilitary threats against the peasant and indigenous communities in the countryside continue unchecked and with total impunity.

U.S. Government spends millions to support repression

While almost every day Human Rights organizations issue urgent alerts for Honduras, the U.S. government
 is moving forward with its plans to “normalize” Honduras’ position in the international community and is trying to get Honduras reinstated in the Organization of American States (OAS); it was expelled after the military coup in June 2009. Furthermore, the U.S. has scheduled millions of dollars in aid to the illegitimate regime of Porfirio Lobo: $1.7 million dollars in direct aid to the military and an estimated $4.6 million in aid to the police and other security forces.

Since Lobo took power in January 2010, through elections that were not recognized by most international human rights groups and observers organizations such as the Carter Centre, there have been as many as 36 political murders, according to the Centre for Constitutional Rights, these murders include teachers, peasants, members of anti-coup resistance groups and 8 journalists.

Join us on March 30th – SAY NO!

–        To the repression and human rights violations.

–        To U.S. military, economic and political aide to Honduras.

–        Stand in solidarity with the March 30th civic strike called by the resistance organizations, unions, and student groups in Honduras.

* Call and email:

Congressional Representatives and Senators (202-224-3121)

Department of State (Honduras Desk: 202-647-3482 202-647)

http://www.state.gov/

 

The White House (202-456-1111)

http://www.whitehouse.gov/contact

Tell them of your concern for the human rights crises in Honduras and your demand to cut off aid to the Lobo regime and end efforts to reinstate Honduras in the OAS.

 

And SIGN THE ONLINE PETITION – Tell the Obama Administration, Congress, the U.N. and the media you demand an end to the repression in Honduras and that the recognition of the Porfirio Lobo government to be withdrawn…

Contact:

  • Chuck Kaufman, Alliance for Global Justice, 202-544-9355, 202-544-9355

 

  • Vicki Cervantes, La Voz de los de Abajo   312-259-5042, 312-259-5042

 

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Silencing American Trade Unions