Tag Archive | Panama

Tropical Islands and Traditional Culture in Guna Yala, Panama*

Tropical Islands and Traditional Culture in Guna Yala, Panama*

The combination of pristine tropical islands and a remarkably well-preserved culture make a trip to Guna Yala just the kind of exhilarating experience that foreign travel should be. Granted the region’s remoteness, lack of modern amenities and rustic accommodations keep many tourists away, but their absence simply adds to the area’s charm. – credit: David Dudenhoefer

 

By David Dudenhoefer

As the boat carried our group from a coastal airstrip in eastern Panama to the Yandup Island Lodge, in the autonomous territory of the Guna Indians, I admired the timeless beauty of my surroundings. A woman in colorful traditional dress glided slowly across the glistening sea in a dugout canoe powered by a lateen sail. The shore of nearby Playón Chico island was lined with Guna huts, their cane walls golden in the morning light, a few bread fruit trees towering over their thatched roofs. A dozen brown pelicans in a flying V glided across the azure sky. A school of tiny fish broke the water’s surface near the bow.

Though it was my 10th trip to Guna Yala (Land of the Guna), which covers much of Panama’s eastern Caribbean coast, I was as thrilled as ever to be there. The combination of pristine tropical islands and a remarkably well-preserved culture make a trip to Guna Yala just the kind of exhilarating experience that foreign travel should be. Granted the region’s remoteness, lack of modern amenities and rustic accommodations keep many tourists away, but their absence simply adds to the area’s charm.

The Guna chiefs prohibit outsiders from owning land, or business in their territory, so every lodge is owned and managed by a Guna family, and most are quite rustic. Yandup, which belongs to the Alvarado family, has established a new standard of comfort and service for the region, as well as commitment to making tourism benefit the community.

We disembarked on a small, grassy island shaded by coconut palms, with a tiny beach in one corner. A Guna woman in traditional dress led me to one of the nine spacious bungalows – with cane walls and thatched roofs, perched over the sea – and informed me that breakfast would be served in 10 minutes (the hardest thing about visiting Guna Yala is that flights depart Panama City at 6 a.m.). The breakfast was tasty, and since the restaurant is built over the water, it overlooks the island village of Playón Chico and the lushly forested slopes of the Serranía de San Blas towering behind it.

One of the 365 San Blas Islands – credit: David Dudenhoefer

 

A Bit of History

That mountain range is one of the reasons that a trip to Guna Yala is like travelling back in time. It has kept outsiders out since the 17th century, when the Guna moved up the coast from northern Colombia into their current territory to escape Spanish colonists. During the 17th and 18th centuries, Guna chiefs formed alliances with French and English pirates, providing them safe harbour and food in exchange for protection from Spain.

They lived in relative peace until the early 20th century, when authorities from the recently founded Republic of Panama established a presence in the area, and began repressing Guna culture. The Guna rebelled in 1925, killing, or capturing all Panamanian officials in their territory in an uprising they call the Revolución de Tule. The U.S. Government, which had considerable clout in Panama in those days, sided with the Guna, so the Panamanians backed off. Subsequent negotiations led to the creation of an autonomous territory called the Comarca Guna Yala (a.k.a. Comarca de San Blas) that is governed by the elected chiefs of the Guna General Congress, in coordination with the Government of Panama.

That territory is priceless – 300,000 hectares (740,000 acres) of rainforest and subsistence farms, 373 kilometres (232 miles) of Caribbean coastline and the 365 San Blas Islands – but the Guna now keep outsiders at bay with the law. This has kept Guna Yala relatively unspoiled, but has disappointed countless developers who covet their idyllic islands.

Sun, Sea and Coral Reefs

After breakfast, we picked up snorkeling gear and headed out to one of the comarca’s uninhabited islands – an acre of sand covered with coconut palms and spider lilies. Only 41 islands hold Guna villages, and most of the San Blas Islands are the stuff of screen savers, with palm-lined, white-sand beaches sloping into a turquoise sea.

Unfortunately, those islands are threatened by the rising sea, driven by climate change. Water from melting mountain glaciers and polar ice caps is pouring into the oceans, while the sea’s surface waters are heating up and expanding. Scientists expect the San Blas Islands – and low-lying islands around the globe – to disappear this century, which would be a tragedy for the Guna, and a loss for the entire world.

That morning, however, the San Blas Islands looked like an untouched paradise. Red sea stars dotted the pale green sea grass in the shallows near the beach, and small waves broke over a reef 50 feet off shore, where dozens of species of corals and sponges populate a submarine garden. I swam out to that reef with one of the guides, and spent more than an hour admiring the angelfish, wrasses and countless other species that live amidst the coral heads. Sea fans swayed to the rhythm of the waves, a school of minnows glittered in the sunlight, and a hawksbill turtle disappeared into the dark blue depths as we approached. At one point, I swam alongside a large eagle ray, until it left me behind with a few flaps of its spotted wings.

Guna waitress Ruby Lopez with lunch – credit: David Dudenhoefer

 

After a few hours of island life, we returned to Yandup for a lunch of fresh fish, rice and vegetables. I then retired to the hammock on the porch of my bungalow, and admired the view of sea and verdant mountains. I was about to slip into a siesta when I heard the sound of a conch bugle, which meant it was time for our tour of Playón Chico village.

Cultural Preservation

A stroll through a Guna village is like stepping back in time, but for the cell phones and radios. Our guide led us through a maze of pathways lined with the cane walls of traditional Guna homes, with a few cement-block buildings scattered here and there – the clinic, a school, a store. Children played in the sandy streets, men chatted on stoops, and Guna women passed us in psychedelic outfits.

One of the most spectacular things about Guna Yala is the traditional dress of its women, which includes a bright-colored skirt and scarf, hand-stitched molas (fabric pictures) worn on their blouses, and intricate beadwork on their calves and forearms. That exotic costume evokes India, whereas their paradisiacal islands are right out of the South Pacific, yet Guna Yala is just a few hours from Miami, and less than an hour by small plane from the skyscrapers of Panama City.

Guna woman selling molas in Playón Chico – credit: David Dudenhoefer

 

Our guide stopped at the Casa de la Cultura, a massive thatched hall found near the centre of every Guna community. Villagers gather there on certain nights to listen to the sahilas (chiefs) sing ancient songs – which tell the history and legends of the Guna – from their seats in hammocks.

On the island’s main street, dozens of women had set up tables in front of their homes to sell handicrafts – beadwork, carved wooden figures, shells. A group of dancers performed a traditional Guna folkdance – rhythmically hopping back and forth while playing panpipes and maracas – for tips. Hundreds of colorful molas were hung in front of the cane walls in hopes of enticing the foreign shoppers.

Molas are one of Panama’s most popular souvenirs, and are sometimes sewn into shoulder bags and clothing, or framed to hang on walls. All Guna women sew molas, both to wear and sell, and they provide one of the main sources of income for people on the islands, along with the sale of coconuts and lobster. Unfortunately, the limited economic options in Guna Yala have led tens of thousands to abandon their island paradise – perhaps half the Guna population – and move to Panama City and other parts of the country to find jobs. Those “expat” Gunas send money to their relatives on the islands, which helps keep the local economy afloat.

Yandup Lodge owner Eligio Alvarado – credit: David Dudenhoefer

 

Responsible Tourism

Elijio Alvarado, owner of the Yandup Island Lodge, says that his goal is to show that tourism can be a positive force for the development of Guna communities. He explains that in addition to the 15 local people who work at the lodge, dozens of families sell molas and other handicrafts to its guests, whereas others sell produce, or seafood to the lodge’s restaurant.

A sociologist who spent years helping Panama’s indigenous nations to defend their territorial rights, Alvarado now wants to help the community he grew up in. His children run the lodge, which allows him to organize community projects, such as one to help Playón Chico improve its garbage management by teaching people to separate their trash, and send recyclables to Panama City. With support from a Spanish organization, he helped the local school start a computer centre, and he is promoting the creation of a museum of Guna culture there.

“I want Yandup to be a model of cultural and ecological tourism,” said Alvarado.

“For me, the only reason to have a business like this is to support the community and strengthen Guna culture.”

 

***************

Travel Essentials

Yandup Island Lodge (www.yandupisland.com, tel. (507) 202-0854) is located near Playón Chico, approximately 150 kilometres (90 miles) northeast of Panama City. Accommodation is in wooden bungalows with private baths and solar-powered lights. All meals, tours and the use of snorkeling equipment are included in the rates.

Getting there: Most travelers arrive from Panama City via a 50-minute flight in a small plane to a coastal airstrip (www.flyairpanama.com), where the lodge’s guides meet guests. An alternative trip by jeep and boat takes about six hours. Yandup Island Lodge can arrange transportation. Most major U.S. airlines have daily flights to Panama City, which has an array of hotels and attractions (www.visitpanama.com).

Source*

Related Topics:

Time – Out of The Crazy Pace of Modern Life

Indigenous Communities Forcefully Removed for U.N. Sponsored Panama Dam*

That Driving Passion

As Rothschilds Did to China, the CIA is Drug Running in the Philippines*

As Rothschilds Did to China, the CIA is Drug Running in the Philippines*

 

Historically, illegal drugs were being used to destroy sovereign countries, and by now the Philippines’ war on drugs is a regular headline by CIA funded journalists and media networks, and a constant object for criticism of the Soros’ Open Society Foundation funded pseudo-non-government organizations, for being brutal and violative of human rights.

Those same critics, however, failed to put their money where their mouth is, especially when it comes to helping the Duterte government rehabilitate close to a million drug surrendered. They would rather focus our attention into the 3,700 deaths, some of which are the direct result of the decisive police action, and the rest were victims of the drug syndicates who are now cleaning their own ranks from squealers, i.e. those who have surrendered and subsequently named their suppliers.

 

The same bleeding hearts who chose to ignore the fact that the statistics related to crime are just the same as in past administrations, only this time it is the criminals who are dying, because once a poor brat is hooked into meth, he must do whatever he can get his fix for the day, which include cell phone snatching, daylight robbery, etc.

Other sordid crimes relating to meth addiction were also brought to light including cannibalism, and in the realm of politics, it has sent a former justice secretary to the present senate, on top of congressmen and mayors who are already funded with drug money for years.

In short, the Philippines’ war on drugs is a necessary measure that must be taken before the country plunges completely into another failed state.

Still at 100th day in office, the Duterte government is able to reduce the crime rate to 50% nationwide using only the national budget crafted by his predecessor. The same budget, which does not include the establishment of rehabilitation centres necessary to help the projected 4 million drug dependents, and for whom the U.S., E.U. and U.N. “human rights advocates” could help more than just paying lip service to the 3,750 so called victims of extrajudicial killings.

 

To those who would rather criticize the sensible actions of the Philippine government that is enjoying 97% trust rating, are you really raising concerns over human rights violations, or just in it to protect the illegal drug industry?

 

The Real Drug Lords: A brief history of CIA involvement in the Drug Trade

By William Blum

This article was first published on August 31, 2008.

1947 to 1951, FRANCE

According to Alfred W. McCoy in The Politics of Heroin in Southeast Asia, CIA arms, money, and disinformation enabled Corsican criminal syndicates in Marseille to wrestle control of labor unions from the Communist Party. The Corsicans gained political influence and control over the docks — ideal conditions for cementing a long-term partnership with mafia drug distributors, which turned Marseille into the postwar heroin capital of the Western world. Marseille’s first heroin laboratones were opened in 1951, only months after the Corsicans took over the waterfront.

EARLY 1950s, SOUTHEAST ASIA

The Nationalist Chinese army, organized by the CIA to wage war against Communist China, became the opium barons of The Golden Triangle (parts of Burma, Thailand and Laos), the world’s largest source of opium and heroin. Air America, the ClA’s principal airline proprietary, flew the drugs all over Southeast Asia. (See Christopher Robbins, Air America, Avon Books, 1985, chapter 9)

1950s to early 1970s, INDOCHINA During U.S. military involvement in Laos and other parts of Indochina, Air America flew opium and heroin throughout the area. Many Gl’s in Vietnam became addicts. A laboratory built at CIA headquarters in northern Laos was used to refine heroin. After a decade of American military intervention, Southeast Asia had become the source of 70 percent of the world’s illicit opium and the major supplier of raw materials for America’s booming heroin market.

1973-80, AUSTRALIA

The Nugan Hand Bank of Sydney was a CIA bank in all but name. Among its officers were a network of U.S. generals, admirals and CIA men, including fommer CIA Director William Colby, who was also one of its lawyers. With branches in Saudi Arabia, Europe, Southeast Asia, South America and the U.S., Nugan Hand Bank financed drug trafficking, money laundering and international arms dealings. In 1980, amidst several mysterious deaths, the bank collapsed, $50 million in debt. (See Jonathan Kwitny, The Crimes of Patriots: A True Tale of Dope, Dirty Money and the CIA, W.W. Norton & Co., 1 987.)

1970s and 1980s, PANAMA

For more than a decade, Panamanian strongman Manuel Noriega was a highly paid CIA asset and collaborator, despite knowledge by U.S. drug authorities as early as 1971 that the general was heavily involved in drug trafficking and money laundering. Noriega facilitated ”guns-for-drugs” flights for the contras, providing protection and pilots, as well as safe havens for drug cartel otficials, and discreet banking facilities. U.S. officials, including then-ClA Director William Webster and several DEA officers, sent Noriega letters of praise for efforts to thwart drug trafficking (albeit only against competitors of his Medellin Cartel patrons). The U.S. government only turned against Noriega, invading Panama in December 1989 and kidnapping the general once they discovered he was providing intelligence and services to the Cubans and Sandinistas. Ironically drug trafficking through Panama increased after the US invasion. (John Dinges, Our Man in Panama, Random House, 1991; National Security Archive Documentation Packet The Contras, Cocaine, and Covert Operations.)

 

1980s, CENTRAL AMERICA

he San Jose Mercury News series documents just one thread of the interwoven operations linking the CIA, the contras and the cocaine cartels. Obsessed with overthrowing the leftist Sandinista government in Nicaragua, Reagan administration officials tolerated drug trafficking as long as the traffickers gave support to the contras. In 1989, the Senate Subcommittee on Terrorism, Narcotics, and International Operations (the Kerry committee) concluded a three-year investigation by stating:

“There was substantial evidence of drug smuggling through the war zones on the part of individual Contras, Contra suppliers, Contra pilots mercenaries who worked with the Contras, and Contra supporters throughout the region…. U.S. officials involved in Central America failed to address the drug issue for fear of jeopardizing the war efforts against Nicaragua…. In each case, one or another agency of the U.S. govemment had intormation regarding the involvement either while it was occurring, or immediately thereafter…. Senior U S policy makers were nit immune to the idea that drug money was a perfect solution to the Contras’ funding problems.” (Drugs, Law Enforcement and Foreign Policy, a Report of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, Subcommittee on Terrorism, Narcotics and Intemational Operations, 1989)

In Costa Rica, which served as the “Southern Front” for the contras (Honduras being the Northern Front), there were several different ClA-contra networks involved in drug trafficking. In addition to those servicing the Meneses-Blandon operation detailed by the Mercury News, and Noriega’s operation, there was CIA operative John Hull, whose farms along Costa Rica’s border with Nicaragua were the main staging area for the contras. Hull and other ClA-connected contra supporters and pilots teamed up with George Morales, a major Miami-based Colombian drug trafficker who later admitted to giving $3 million in cash and several planes to contra leaders. In 1989, after the Costa Rica government indicted Hull for drug trafficking, a DEA-hired plane clandestinely and illegally flew the CIA operative to Miami, via Haiti. The US repeatedly thwarted Costa Rican efforts to extradite Hull back to Costa Rica to stand trial. Another Costa Rican-based drug ring involved a group of Cuban Amencans whom the CIA had hired as military trainers for the contras. Many had long been involved with the CIA and drug trafficking They used contra planes and a Costa Rican-based shnmp company, which laundered money for the CIA, to move cocaine to the U.S. Costa Rica was not the only route. Guatemala, whose military intelligence service — closely associated with the CIA — harbored many drug traffickers, according to the DEA, was another way station along the cocaine highway.

Additionally, the Medellin Cartel’s Miami accountant, Ramon Milian Rodriguez, testified that he funneled nearly $10 million to Nicaraguan contras through long-time CIA operative Felix Rodriguez, who was based at Ilopango Air Force Base in El Salvador. The contras provided both protection and infrastructure (planes, pilots, airstrips, warehouses, front companies and banks) to these ClA-linked drug networks. At least four transport companies under investigation for drug trafficking received US govemment contracts to carry non-lethal supplies to the contras. Southern Air Transport, “formerly” ClA-owned, and later under Pentagon contract, was involved in the drug running as well. Cocaine-laden planes flew to Florida, Texas, Louisiana and other locations, including several militarv bases Designated as ‘Contra Craft,” these shipments were not to be inspected. When some authority wasn’t clued in and made an arrest, powerful strings were pulled on behalf of dropping the case, acquittal, reduced sentence, or deportation.

1980s to early 1990s, AFGHANISTAN

ClA-supported Moujahedeen rebels engaged heavily in drug trafficking while fighting against the Soviet-supported govemment and its plans to reform the very backward Afghan society. The Agency’s principal client was Gulbuddin Hekmatyar, one of the leading druglords and leading heroin refiner. CIA supplied trucks and mules, which had carried arms into Afghanistan, were used to transport opium to laboratories along the Afghan Pakistan border. The output provided up to one half of the heroin used annually in the United States and three-quarters of that used in Western Europe. US officials admitted in 1990 that they had failed to investigate or take action against the drug operabon because of a desire not to offend their Pakistani and Afghan allies. In 1993, an official of the DEA called Afghanistan the new Colombia of the drug world.

MlD-1980s to early 199Os, HAITI

While working to keep key Haitian military and political leaders in power, the CIA turned a blind eye to their clients’ drug trafficking. In 1986, the Agency added some more names to its payroll by creating a new Haitian organization, the National Intelligence Service (SIN). SIN was purportedly created to fight the cocaine trade, though SIN officers themselves engaged in the trafficking, a trade aided and abetted by some of the Haitian military and political leaders.

William Blum is author of Killing Hope: U.S Military and CIA Interventions Since World War ll available from Common Courage Press, P.O. Box 702, Monroe, Maine, 04951

http://www.globalresearch.ca/the-real-drug-lords-a-brief-history-of-cia-involvement-in-the-drug-trade/10013

Washington’s Hidden Agenda: Restore the Drug Trade

By Prof Michel Chossudovsky
Global Research, October 01, 2016

In 2014 the Afghan opium cultivation has once again hit a record high, according to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime’s 2014 Afghan Opium Survey.

In the course of the last four years, there has been a surge in Afghan opium production. The Vienna based UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) reveals that poppy cultivation in 2012 extended over an area of more than 154,000 hectares, an increase of 18% over 2011. A UNODC spokesperson confirmed in 2013 that opium production is heading towards record levels.

Source: United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime’s 2014 Afghan Opium Survey.

According to the 2012 Afghanistan Opium Survey released in November 2012 by the Ministry of Counter Narcotics (MCN) and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC). potential opium production in 2012 was of the order of 3,700 tons, a decline of 18 percent in relation to 2001, according to UNODC data.

There is reason to believe that this figure of 3700 tons is grossly underestimated. Moreover, it contradicts the UNOCD’s own predictions of record harvests over an extended area of cultivation.

While bad weather and damaged crops may have played a role as suggested by the UNODC, based on historical trends, the potential production for an area of cultivation of 154,000 hectares, should be well in excess of 6000 tons. With 80,000 hectares in cultivation in 2003, production was already of the order of 3600 tons.

It is worth noting that UNODC has modified the concepts and figures on opium sales and heroin production, as outlined by the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA).

A change in U.N. methodology in 2010 resulted in a sharp downward revision of Afghan heroin production estimates for 2004 to 2011. UNODC used to estimate that the entire global opium crop was processed into heroin, and provided global heroin production estimates on that basis. Before 2010, a global conversion rate of about 10 kg of opium to 1 kg of heroin was used to estimate world heroin production (17). For instance, the estimated 4 620 tonnes of opium harvested worldwide in 2005 was thought to make it possible to manufacture 472 tonnes of heroin (UNODC, 2009a). However, UNODC now estimates that a large proportion of the Afghan opium harvest is not processed into heroin or morphine but remains ‘available on the drug market as opium’ (UNODC, 2010a). …EU drug markets report: a strategic analysis, EMCDDA, Lisbon, January 2013 emphasis added

 

There is no evidence that a large percentage of opium production is no longer processed into heroin as claimed by the U.N. This revised UNODC methodology has served, –through the outright manipulation of statistical concepts– to artificially reduce the size of of the global trade in heroin.

According to the UNODC, quoted in the EMCDDA report:

“an estimated 3 400 tonnes of Afghan opium was not transformed into heroin or morphine in 2011. Compared with previous years, this is an exceptionally high proportion of the total crop, representing nearly 60 % of the Afghan opium harvest and close to 50 % of the global harvest in 2011.

What the UNODC, –whose mandate is to support the prevention of organized criminal activity– has done is to obfuscate the size and criminal nature of the Afghan drug trade, intimating –without evidence– that a large part of the opium is no longer channeled towards the illegal heroin market.

In 2012 according to the UNODC, farmgate prices for opium were of the order of 196 per kg.

Each kg. of opium produces 100 grams of pure heroin. The U.S. retail prices for heroin (with a low level of purity) is, according to UNODC of the order of $172 a gram. The price per gram of pure heroin is substantially higher.

The profits are largely reaped at the level of the international wholesale and retail markets of heroin as well as in the process of money laundering in Western banking institutions.

The revenues derived from the global trade in heroin constitute a multi-billion dollar bonanza for financial institutions and organized crime.

The following article first published in May 2005 provides a background on the history of the Afghan opium trade which continues to this date to be protected by U.S.-NATO occupation forces on behalf of powerful financial interests.

Source*

Related Topics:

Nixon Advisor Admitted War on Drugs Invented to Crush Anti-War and Black Movements*

Ask Senator McConnell Why the War-on-Drugs was never a ‘War’*

How the CIA Used LSD to Destroy the New Left*

Drop in Drug Trafficking Followed Expulsion of U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration*

Retired CIA Agent Framed for Exposing U.S. Running Opium Trade*

What I’ve Learnt About US Foreign Policy*

 

100,000 Panamanians march against UN-NWO Sex Education*

100,000 Panamanians march against UN-NWO Sex Education*

By Marianna Orlandi

A hundred thousand Panamanians took to their capital city’s streets to oppose a new national bill that would introduce both sexuality education and gender ideology into their schools.

This law is a colonization attempt. It was written and imposed on Panama by UN Population Fund (UNFPA) and it is not the fruit of our legislature’s will,” Juan Francisco de la Guardia told the Friday Fax. De la Guardia is president of the Panamanian Alliance for Life and Family and one of the march organizers.

Despite the protest, the President of the Panamanian Parliament, Rubén de León Sanchez, said that the law will advance to the health committee and then discussed, once again, by the state’s legislature.

The bill, introduced by deputy of the Democratic Revolutionary Party Crispiano Adames, is modelled after the “Comprehensive Sexuality Education” (CSE) sponsored by U.N. agencies. The programs, whose biases have already been exposed by several commentators, are based on the recognition of minors’ entitlement to “sexual and reproductive health and rights.”

NWO FamilyPanamanians object to the way the programs promote children’s sexualization, endorse their sexual activity, invite children to experiment with homosexual relationships, and denigrate “traditional” social roles as “sexist” stereotypes.

Whereas the CSE advocates see abortion as a “right,” Panama protects unborn children from abortion in its laws except if the mother’s life is endangered, or if she is the victim of rape or incest.

While the law does not criminalize homosexual intercourse, the code of private international law, approved in 2014, prohibits same-sex marriages in the country, and it explicitly excludes the legality of same-sex marriages performed abroad. Panamanians view these laws as a legitimate expression of their sovereignty and a reflection of the most profound values of its people.

Following the march, de la Guardia made an official statement on behalf of all the organizers, including several prolife and pro-family NGOs, joined by the Catholic Church and by other Christian confessions. Speaking before a commission of deputies, he emphasized parental rights, freedom of religion and belief, and the right to conscientious objection and condemned the bill’s “ideological character.” He urged a return to more effective programs of education, such as the “School for Parents” that the state adopted in the past.

The Panamanian Conference of Bishops also asked the Parliament to reconsider its promotion of the law, saying

“We cannot accept experiments that failed in other places.”

Recent studies have shown that the U.N. model of CSE has indeed proven ineffective where adopted. Opponents have pointed out that it did not alleviate problems it was designed to address, such as teen pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases. Recent studies have also shown the comparative effectiveness of programs based on abstinence that have often led to good results.

While rejoicing for the success of the march, the parents of Panama are keeping their eyes wide open. Many fear that the ministerial guidelines that accompanied this bill, because of their executive character, may be applied in the country even if the law is not approved.

Source*

Related Topics:

180,000 Italians Say No to Gender Theory and Sex Education*

Thousands Rally in Rome to defend Natural Family and against Gender Theory*

Thousands of Kids Stay Home In Protest against Ontario’s Sex-Ed*

Taking School Sex Education too Far*

Sexual Liberation a Tool of Mass Control*

U.K. Children as young as 4 being asked their Gender Option other than Male or Female*

Sexual Assaults on Children Rise to 85 a Day in the U.K.*

British Paedophile Who Abused Over 200 Children in Malaysia Gets Life in Prison*

Australian Principal Accused of 74 Child Sex Charges Walks free in Israel*

Kids in Same-sex Households at Greater Risk of Mental Health Problems*

Normalizing Paedophilia through Sex for Children*

Former Head of FBI Speaks on Rothschild, Illuminati, Satanism, Paedophile Rings = NWO

Ontario Teacher Disciplined for Criticizing Child Sex Ed. – Paedophilia Program*

Fears of a British Policed State Rising Midst the Elite Paedophile Scourge*

American College of Paediatricians Legalizing Same-Sex Marriage was a ‘A Tragic Day for America’s Children’*

Surprise – STD Rates among U.S. Homosexuals ‘alarming,’*

Jewish Sexology and the Assault on Gender and the Family*

E.U. Making Paedophilia Legal Across Europe*

A Global Paedophile Ring Busted from Australia*

Paedophilia becoming the Accepted Norm in Germany*

U.S. Legalizing Paedophilia and Bestiality

Raised by Transgendered Parent, but against Transgendered Adoption*

The Trouble with Changing your Gender*

The West Exports Porn, Casual Sex, and the Blood of the pre-born not Freedom*

Obama Spent $700 Million Promoting Homosexuality Overseas*

Canada: The Effect of Homosexual Parenting on One Child*

U.K. Police Target Schoolchildren as Young as 4 with Tax Payer Funded, Transgender Propaganda*

Oklahoma Plan to Castrate Sex Offenders*

Alabama Lawmaker Introduces Mandatory Castration for Child Sexual Abuse*

Indigenous Communities Forcefully Removed for U.N. Sponsored Panama Dam*

Indigenous Communities Forcefully Removed for U.N. Sponsored Panama Dam*

Today the floodgates were opened on the contentious U.N. backed Barro Blanco hydro dam in Panama, sparking forced removal by authorities of indigenous Ngäbe communities that are living in protest camps near the dam site. With construction finished, GENISA, the company that owns and operates the dam, has begun to flood the reservoir today, which will inundate six hectares of indigenous territories.

According to the Movimiento 10 de Abril (M10)—a group representing indigenous peoples directly affected by the project—35 community members, including women and children, were arrested and are currently being held in police custody in the Missionary Centre of Tolé. Following the arrests, backhoes moved into the area to tear down their encampments.

Local Ngäbe organizations are now on high alert and are planning on taking further actions to oppose the dam, which is financed by the German and Dutch national development banks (DEG and FMO) and the Central American Bank for Economic Integration. Already fearing that the situation will escalate, international NGOs launched a petition in April 2016, calling on President Juan Carlos Varela to ensure that the affected Ngäbe people are free from intimidation and repression. The petition has been signed by 84,000 people to date.

“We, the affected communities, have never given our consent to Barro Blanco. This project violates the Panamanian Constitution and our indigenous rights. ASEP has not warned us about the imminent flooding that will destroy our crops, some of our houses and kill our livestock,” declared Manolo Miranda, spokesperson of the M10.

National and international organizations are deeply concerned for the personal safety and security of the Ngäbe people and call on Panama to protect their rights including the rights to security and peaceful assembly.

“Panamanian authorities must protect the rights of the Ngäbe people who have not consented to this project,” said Alyssa Johl, Senior Attorney at the Center for International Environmental Law. “We urge the Panamanian government to ensure the personal safety and security of the Ngäbe people and otherwise fulfil their human rights obligations. The world is watching.”

In 2015, Panama recognized that the Barro Blanco project had been approved in violation of the Ngäbe’s social and cultural rights and the government temporarily suspended the construction of the project. A few months later, the government fined the project developer $775,000 for failing to adequately consult, relocate and compensate those adversely affected by the dam. To this day, the government has not reached an agreement with the communities.

Barro Blanco is an U.N.-sponsored project that is designed to support sustainable development in poorer countries while enabling wealthier countries to achieve emissions reductions cost-efficiently. However, Barro Blanco demonstrates how climate mitigation projects can have adverse impacts on peoples and communities and the environments on which they depend.

The Paris Agreement recognized the need for human rights protections in climate action and created a new Sustainable Development Mechanism (SDM) under which all countries will be able to generate and/or use credits to offset emissions. Parties of the UNFCCC are currently meeting in Bonn to discuss the modalities and procedure of the new SDM.

“Barro Blanco is a clear example of why human rights protections must be included in the newly established SDM. The SDM must learn from the CDM’s mistakes. As the Paris Agreement committed to protect human rights, Parties must ensure that another Barro Blanco never happens again” said Pierre-Jean Brasier, Network Coordinator at Carbon Market Watch.

A report to be published this week by Carbon Market Watch and Misereor also highlights the need to incorporate human rights into climate action, including the case of Barro Blanco.

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Icelandic PM Refuses to Resign Amid Panama Papers Leak*

Icelandic PM Refuses to Resign Amid Panama Papers Leak*

According to documents, Gunnlaugsson and his wife purchased offshore company Wintris Inc. in British Virgin Islands in Dec 2007.

Iceland’s Prime Minister Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson, who has been named in the Panama Papers about offshore financial dealings. (Photo: AP)

 

Iceland’s prime minister refused on Monday to resign despite calls to do so after leaked “Panama Papers” tax documents showed he and his wife used an offshore firm to allegedly hide million-dollar investments.

“I have not considered quitting because of this matter nor am I going to quit because of this matter,” Prime Minister Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson told Icelandic television Channel 2.

According to the leaked documents, Gunnlaugsson and his wife Anna Sigurlaug Palsdottir purchased the offshore company Wintris Inc. in the British Virgin Islands in December 2007.

He transferred his 50-percent stake to her in 2009 for the symbolic sum of one dollar.

He has insisted he never hid any money abroad, and says his wife, who inherited a fortune from her father, has paid all her taxes in Iceland.

“She has neither utilised tax havens nor can you say that her company is an offshore company in the sense that it pays taxes abroad rather than in Iceland,” Gunnlaugsson said on his website.

Whether or not Gunnlaugsson is guilty of tax evasion remains to be proven, but his opponents have insisted he step down regardless.

“The prime minister should immediately resign,” former Social Democratic Prime Minister Johanna Sigurdardottir said in a message posted on Facebook.

More than 24,000 Icelanders have also signed a petition demanding his resignation, while the opposition has said it will seek a vote of no confidence in parliament, likely to be held this week.

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