Tag Archive | racism

The Lynching of Hamza Yusuf*

The Lynching of Hamza Yusuf*

White American Muslim Leader Excoriated for Defending the United States, Law Enforcement, Criticizing Radical Political Islam, and Refusing to Blindly Back Black Lives Matter

By Hanan al-Harbi

Shaykh Hamza Yusuf is a scholar of Islam and a popular preacher who has helped disseminate traditional, mainstream, spiritual Islam, and actively opposed fundamentalism, literalism, and extremism. He is also an accomplished college administrator.

And although, like myself, he has many human shortcomings and is not above criticism, he deserves recognition for his service to Islam and Muslims. So, despite our differences, I speak truth and stand for justice so much so that I would not hesitate to defend Shaykh Hamza if he were subject to injustice. And that moment has come.

If the New Year is synonymous with resolutions, many Muslims evidently did not commit to avoid slander, libel, and defamation of character when responding to some of the comments that Shaykh Hamza Yusuf made at the Reviving the Islamic Spirit Conference in December of 2016.

The year ended, and the year began, with a storm of controversy that was supposedly spurred on by the observations made by the white American Sunni Muslim scholar on the Black Lives Matter movement and Radical Political Islam. It was a storm in a teacup that spoke more of the stereotypes and racism of the critics than the views of Hamza Yusuf. What exactly did the Shaykh say on December 23, 2016? I let him speak for himself:

“The United States is, in term of its laws, one of the least racist societies in the world. We have some of the best anti-discriminatory laws on the planet… We have between 15-18,000 homicides a year, 50 per cent are black on black crime… There are twice as many whites that have been shot by police but nobody ever shows those videos. It’s the assumption that the police are racist and it’s not always the case… I think it’s very dangerous to just broad stroke any police that shoots a black as immediately being considered a racist, sometimes these are African American police officers. The police aren’t all racist.”

Hamza Yusuf also added that:

“We should all be against any ideologies of supremacy of one people over another people, it’s completely antithetical to our religion but we have some of the worst racism in our own communities… the anti-Jewish rhetoric that you hear in the Islamic community is horrific… do you know what it’s like to be a Pakistani in a lot of the Gulf States or from India or from Kerala even worse? People talk about white privilege, what about Arab privilege over non-Arabs in the Middle East?”

He criticized Muslims who “have turned Islam into a political ideology.” He said that most of Islam has nothing to do with politics. He explained that groups like the Muslim Brotherhood, Hizb al-Tahrir and al-Qaedah were a reaction to political expression rooted in the corruption of Islamic doctrine. He also claimed that Yasir Qadhi was a source of division among Muslims.

In his unwarranted and unnecessary response to unmerited criticism, Shaykh Hamza Yusuf apologized for criticizing Qadhi, explained that he had no desire to belittle the struggle of African American people against racism, and asserted that he did not believe that the Muslim Brotherhood spawned al-Qaedah. What is more, he stressed that he did not want to see supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood persecuted for their political beliefs.

Shaykh Abdullah Hakim Quick responded by stating that:

“Muslim leaders in the Americas who do not recognize the systematic subjugation and continued suppression of black people in the West and do not speak clearly against the organized racism that is raising its head today should step down and keep their mouths shut!!! They do not represent Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) in their cowardice and should stop blaming black People and Native People for their weak family structure or drug addiction. Stop victimizing the victims. Is their [sic] no blood in our veins or is it cold water? Are Muslims attending conferences to be entertained or to seek guidance? May Allah raise up courageous leadership from our people and protect us from hypocrisy!!!”

Dr. Jonathan AC Brown said that:

“Muslims in America should stand with Black Lives Matter, as should anyone who has a problem with an absurd number of unarmed men being shot with impunity. Not only is this a clear justice issue, but Muslims suffer from similar problems, and many Muslims are black! Muslims who don’t have the bandwidth to be supportive on this issue should remain silent on it… In short, white men should let African Americans speak for themselves and support them. They probably shouldn’t offer their opinions on issues regarding the African American community. We can sit and insult the ‘Muslim Brotherhood,’ whatever that means, till we’re good and happy. But to use ‘the Muslim Brotherhood’ in the same sentence with ISIS, terrorism or extremism cannot be tolerated. It lends credence to the absurd policies advanced by the UAE/Sisi regime, which have led to the oppression, imprisoning, rape and torture of thousands in Egypt and elsewhere. In the U.S, and Europe, it advances the UAE/Islamophobe agenda of criminalizing mainstream Muslim organizations.”

Ustadh Ubaydullah Evans, ALIM’s first Scholar-in-Residence and Executive Director, asserted that:

“Shaykh Hamza’s commenting on black on black violence and the breakdown of the black family in connection with the value of black life and police brutality is unacceptable. Someone must explain to my Shaykh that the fact of white privilege precludes the possibility of his being able to make such comments with any integrity.”

Imam Suhaib Webb alleged that Shaykh Hamza Yusuf dismissed

“the Black Lives Matter movement, police brutality against blacks in America, the racial bias in the criminal justice system in the U.S., sentencing guidelines, prison terms and a few other issues that, as a white man, he should address with extreme care.”

Dr. Su’ad Abdul Khabeer, Sakina Hasib, and Hakeem Muhammad accused Shaykh Hamza of pathologizing black people. Many critics discredited Hamza Yusuf on the basis that he was “white” and even called into question his title of “Shaykh.” What is more, he was openly accused of being a racist and a bigot. Did he deserve to be dragged in the dust? Let me consider the comments that he made.

Shaykh Hamza Yusuf claimed that “The United States is, in term of its laws, one of the least racist societies in the world.” According to the World Value survey, the most racially intolerant countries in the world, in order, include India, Jordan, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Vietnam, Indonesia, South Korea, France, Turkey, Bulgaria, Algeria, Morocco, Mali, Zambia, Thailand, Malaysia, the Philippines, Bangladesh, and Hong Kong whereas the most tolerant countries include, in order, the United States, Canada, Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, Guatemala, Britain, Sweden, Norway, Latvia, Australia, and New Zealand. In a combined study of two surveys published by the Washington Post, the ten most racist countries in the world included, in order, India, Lebanon, Bahrain, Libya, Egypt, the Philippines, Kuwait, Palestine, South Africa, and South Korea. The Shaykh is also correct when he states that the US has “some of the best anti-discriminatory laws on the planet.”

Shaykh Hamza Yusuf never alleged that there was no racism in the United States. The country has a long and shameful history of racism, segregation, discrimination, and injustice towards all those who were not White Anglo-Saxon Protestants. First Nations, Africans, French Canadians, Hispanics, Asians, the Irish, Italians, Jews, Catholics, and Muslims have all historically suffered injustice in America. The same, however, can also be said for poor White Anglo-Saxon Protestants who have been exploited, marginalized, and treated like trash. The Shaykh is also perfectly cognizant that the judicial system is not always just and that the correctional system fails to correct anything.

The Shaykh, who is well-travelled and well-educated about social issues throughout the world, is not naïve, narrow-minded, and fixated on the United States. His comments were the product of a global outlook. For hyper-sensitive self-centred individuals to claim that Hamza Yusuf was trivializing or minimizing the reality of racism in the United States, and the Western world, is utterly unfair. He was focusing on the big picture and exposing double standards.

Although Mehdi Hasan was aggressively trying to corner him, in the impolite, uncouth, insolent and disrespectful fashion that was popularized by Fox News, Shaykh Hamza Yusuf attempted to redirect the conversation toward reality:

“We have between 15-18,000 homicides a year, 50 per cent are black on black crime… There are twice as many whites that have been shot by police but nobody ever shows those videos. It’s the assumption that the police are racist and it’s not always the case… I think it’s very dangerous to just broad stroke any police that shoots a black as immediately being considered a racist, sometimes these are African American police officers. The police aren’t all racist.”

African Americans represent 13.3% of the population of the United States. Nonetheless, they have been responsible for more than half of homicides for nearly 30 years. As Department of Justice statistics show, blacks committed 52% of murders between 1980 and 2008. Caucasian Americans, however, committed 45 % of homicides while composing 77% of the population.

Black Americans commit crimes at a rate that is 7 to 10 times higher than white Americans. What is more, data shows that 93% of blacks are murdered by other blacks. (Conversely, 83 % of white victims are murdered by other whites). So, if Shaykh Hamza can be criticized for one thing, it is for underestimating the magnitude of black-on-black crime.

In the 1940s and 1950s, the rate of black crime was lower even though racism was deeply entrenched and institutionalized. There is not always a direct correlation between poverty, racism, and crime. The rate of Caucasian crime did not increase significantly during the Great Depression. Although the Irish were impoverished and forced into starvation by British imperialists, there was no notable spike in criminality.

Most rural, and many urban, French Canadians were poor during English-domination in Canada; however, their rate of crime was never disproportionately high. Many people of the world are far poorer than African Americans, have fewer opportunities, and suffer from far greater levels of persecution in the Americas, Asia, and Africa, yet do not turn to crime.

Shaykh Hamza Yusuf is correct when he makes a correlation between black crime and the breakdown of the family structure. If most African American children in the 1960s were born to two-parent households, in 2013, over 72% of them were born out-of-wedlock. Consequently, “structural racism” cannot be exclusively blamed for the disintegration of the African American family.

Capitalism does not compel African American men to fornicate, produce, and abandon illegitimate off-spring. It is a question of choice. Lack of morals, lack of ethics, lack of proper parenting, and lack of paternal engagement are largely responsible for producing a materialistic, hedonistic, and self-destructive underclass of African American men. Black illegitimacy is not driven by white racism.

A major theme in the message of Malcolm X, perhaps the greatest Muslim leader this country has produced, to the black community was: “Clean up your own back yard.” Black Americans need to stop using colour as a crutch, perpetuating the blame game, and hold themselves accountable. White supremacy has been deeply damaging to people of colour. The scars of slavery remain. And racism continues to rear its ugly head. However, African Americans are ultimately responsible for their own destiny. While it is a sin to oppress, it is a greater also a sin to remain oppressed when real steps toward self-liberation can be taken.

There is no doubt that African Americans have been oppressed. However, there is no doubt that certain African Americans consciously continue to oppress themselves. In short, some have failed to break the psychological chains of slavery. They need to show some pride and rise-up in righteous reform. Many have done so, and many have succeeded. Islam has specifically been a source of salvation for millions of African Americans.

Although it is almost entirely ignored by both the mass media and activists, Native Americans are the most likely to be killed by cops. African Americans come in second. Hispanics come in third. And Caucasians come in fourth. And while Americans of indigenous and African ancestry are shot at a rate that is 2.5 to 3% higher than Caucasian Americans, whites are also murdered at an alarming rate. In fact, American police officers kill more people in days than most other countries kill in years.

Shaykh Hamza Yusuf was not minimizing the murder of black men by police officers of all races, he was placing it in the broader context of police violence and brutality. And while racism certainly plays a critical factor in some cases, poor hiring practices and poor training also play a major role in how the police handle certain situations. Many police officers are not properly trained in conflict resolution, de-escalation, crisis management, mental health issues, psychological intervention, and non-lethal modes of subduing subjects.

As a man with a sense of justice and balance, Shaykh Hamza refused to stereotype all law enforcement officers. As he said straight out: “The police aren’t all racist.” While it cannot be denied that African American men are murdered by police officers at a disproportionate rate, it cannot be denied that African American men commit violent crimes at a disproportionate rate and murder police officers at a disproportionate rate.

When 43% of cop killers are African Americans, per FBI statistics, it should come as no surprise that some police officers fear for their lives when confronting black suspects. The idiotic constitutional right to bear arms, the sheer stupidity of conceal and carry laws, the massive supply of illegal weapons, and the culture of violence that dominates the media, cause police officers to be overly anxious and too quick to click the trigger. For some of them, it is better to shoot first than to get shot. Unfortunately, the fear of police on the part of African American men, the natural result of poor practices in law enforcement, produces the same effect. The situation is dangerous and volatile and can only be resolved by means of a concerted and comprehensive strategy.

Despite the allegations of Shaykh Abdullah Hakim Quick, Shaykh Hamza Yusuf is well-aware of the subjugation and suppression of African Americans in the West and the reality of racism. Hence, calling Shaykh Hamza a coward and a hypocrite who does not represent the Messenger of Allah is truly unbecoming of a scholar.

As for accusing Shaykh Hamza of pathologizing black people, as done by Dr. Su’ad Abdul Khabeer, Sakina Hasib, and Hakeem Muhammad, this is simply slanderous, libellous, and scandalous.

Ubaydullah Evans describes black pathology as “the idea that black people are inherently incapable of thinking and behaving correctly and it is often used to explain away systemic racism.” While I may not agree with all his views and the manner he formulates them, I am quite confident that Shaykh Hamza does not believe that blacks are intellectually and morally inferior by nature.

The Shaykh was not generalizing. The Shaykh was not victim-blaming with the objective of trivializing the reality of racism and its ravages. He was simply promoting good, prohibiting evil, and reminding people that God does not change the condition of a people unless they change what is in themselves (Qur’an: 13:11).

As far as Evans is concerned, the accomplishments of Hamza Yusuf are inconsequential for, as he states, “he-is-still-white.” If white people cannot be objective due to their whiteness than black people cannot be objective due to their blackness. It is ironic that the people who accuse Shaykh Hamza of stereotyping blacks are themselves guilty of stereotyping whites.

While it is true that some white Americans blame disadvantaged blacks for the condition in which they find themselves, the same cannot be said of Hamza Yusuf. If anything, the Shaykh is concerned with the plight of African Americans and sincerely concerned about their condition.

The language used by Shaykh Hamza Yusuf is no different than the language used by W.D. Fard, Elijah Muhammad, and Malcolm X. Identifying symptoms does not imply that one ignores the underlying disease. Some African Americans are culturally sick (in the same way that some Caucasian Americans are culturally sick). Although history, upbringing, and environment can predispose people to certain diseases, their life-choices are also a significant contributing factor.

Slavery, racism, segregation, and discrimination have spread socio-political, economic, moral, and ethical illness among some African Americans. The system has much to blame. However, people affected by epidemics are also responsible for perpetuating them. If one opts to live a life of filth, it is pointless to blame germs for one’s poor health. America has oppressed many; however, many people have overcome oppression, Jewish Americans being the foremost example.

The mere fact that one is an Amerindian, for example, does not mean that one is condemned to repeat the cycle of poverty, abuse, and addiction. Opportunities may not be entirely equal; however, one would be hard pressed to find a country that offers more opportunities than the United States of America. Immigrants and refugees of all origins have arrived by millions over the centuries with nothing more than the clothes on their backs; however, with hard work, study, diligence, and determination, they achieved the American dream. In some cases, they succeeded in one generation. In others, it took several generations; however, they made the necessary sacrifices to ensure the long-term success of their descendants.

Dr. Jonathan AC Brown is correct that Muslims are required to stand for social justice. However, his claim that Shaykh Hamza is not supportive of the struggle of African Americans is not sound. To claim that whites cannot express their opinions on issues pertaining to blacks is as preposterous as claiming that blacks cannot express their opinions on issues pertaining to whites. And while Muslims are expected to support the struggles of the oppressed, they are under no obligation to support any specific movement especially when the so-called cure is worse than the disease. In short, they should be guided by their conscience.

BLM is unapologetically black. It affirms diversity, restorative justice, loving engagement, intergenerationality, globalism, black families, black villages, black women, collective value, and empathy. It also happens to be transgender affirming and queer affirming and is “committed to disrupting the Western-prescribed nuclear family.”

The founders of Black Lives Matter include Alicia Garza, a queer woman whose spouse is transgendered; Patrisse Cullors, another queer; and Opal Tometi, a Nigerian-American woman who explained in an interview with The Nation that “we are diligently uplifting black trans women and so the work on the ground in many places does reflect that.”

If Dr. Jonathan AC Brown, a white American Muslim academic and outspoken supporter of gay marriage and the Muslim Brotherhood sees no contradiction between LGBTQ activism and Radical Islamism, he is also ironically an apologist for slavery and sexual assault.

In fact, on February 7th, 2017, Professor Brown delivered a lecture at Georgetown University titled “Islam and the Problem of Slavery” in which he affirmed that “I don’t think it’s morally evil to own somebody” and “[f]or most of human history, human beings have not thought of consent as the essential feature of morally correct sexual activity.” If this man is a moderate, what can we expect of the extremists?

When asked about “wrongs done by Arabs to other people,” Dr. Brown aggressively asserted that “the Prophet of God had slaves. He had slaves. There’s no denying that. Was he — are you more morally mature than the Prophet of God? No, you’re not.” In reality, rather than enslave, the Prophet Muhammad freed slaves. Anyone seeking clarity on this subject should read “An Islamic Response to ISIS Revival of Slavery” by Imam Abdul-Malik Mujahid (https://www.soundvision.com/article/an-islamic-response-to-isis-revival-of-slavery).

The version of Islam presented by Professor Brown is not that of the Prophet Muhammad: it is that of the Umayyads and the ‘Abbasids; it is the Islam of Ibn Taymiyyah, Muhammad ibn ‘Abd al-Wahhab, the Muslim Brotherhood, the Taliban, Hamas, Islamic Jihad, al-Qaedah, al-Shabab, Boko Haram, al-Nusrah, and ISIS. It is not Muhammadan Islam but the “Islam” of the enemies of Muhammad who usurped power after his passing.

The fact that Brown is the Director of the Prince Alwaleed bin Talal Centre for Muslim-Christian Understanding, a Saudi Arabian funded program, should not be lost on anyone. It suffices to say that Liberal degenerates and Islamist extremists make strange bedfellows.

According to Black Lives Matter, “Black people are intentionally left powerless at the hands of the state”… and “Black lives are deprived of … basic human rights and dignity.” If this is how BLM supporters feel, I suggest they study the history of Africa, the Middle East, or Asia to get a better appreciation of civil and human rights in the United States of America.

It was white men who proposed that all men were created equal. It was white men who eventually abolished slavery while African, Arab, and Asian Muslim leaders objected, insisting, in many cases, on continuing the practice well into the 20th century. It was white men who created a country, a constitution, and laws that provide blacks, and all other citizens, with unparalleled rights and freedoms. Muslims stand with the oppressed but they must also stand for truth.

Black Lives Matter claims that “Black poverty and genocide is state violence.” BLM supporters should study the English language to understand that “genocide” is the attempt to physically exterminate members of a given group. Poverty is not genocide.

Black Lives Matter claims that the fact that 2.8 million black people are locked in cages in this country is state violence. In reality, there are approximately 2.3 million incarcerated criminals in the United States; 1 million of whom are African American. If whites are 64% of the American population, they represent 39% of prisoners. If blacks are 13% of the American population, they represent 40% of prisoners.

Imprisoning black criminals is no more state violence than imprisoning white criminals. The fact that blacks are given longer sentences for the same crimes as whites — entirely apart from the fact that they commit more crimes per capita – is indeed a form of “state violence.” Although African Americans tend to serve disproportionately longer sentences when compared to Caucasian Americans, it is delusional to describe them as “political prisoners.” Drug dealers, robbers, rapists, and murderers are not prisoners of conscience.

[ Editor’s Note: This is a long time held bogus contention, the racial disparity. It is done in the usual way that any psyops construct would use. You just only use the parts of the story that support where you want to go, and ignore everything else. Here the deal in on phrase, “enhanced sentencing guidelines”, that have been around for a long time.

This allows judges, usually on the federal level, to a sentence for a crime that has a range of imprisonment, say “25 years to life” for drug dealing. How much time a convicted felon gets is heavily influenced on the past criminal record, where unfortunately many black criminals excel, especially gang-members and those in the drug business when they have a string of prior convictions.

Another example I remember from when California passed a statue where a third violent felony conviction would get you a life sentence. This was something designed to address the continued crimes done by “habitual offenders” when let out went back to their old ways. And yes, when they were not let go the violent felony crimes rates improved.

And lastly, most of the minority crimes numbers are pushed by the stats from black and hispanic young gang members. There are no white gangs of any consequence anymore other than some bikers. All of this I have just covered is completely airbrushed out of the history, and there is more Jim W. Dean ]

Many of the problems attributed to race by Black Lives Matter are really issues of class. The rate of criminality among poor whites is comparable to that among poor blacks. Address the issue of poverty, improve education, and increase opportunities among African Americans, and the level of crime will go down accordingly. Middle and upper-middle class African Americans do not commit any more crimes than middle and-upper middle class Caucasians.

The problems in question are not limited to blacks or whites. They impact society as a whole. Incarceration trends are alarming. Racial disparities in sentencing are disquieting. And while contributing factors need to be considered, there is a serious need for radical criminal justice reform in the United States. All Americans suffer as a result of systemic shortcomings. All Americans suffers from the injustices perpetuated by Capitalism.

 

Black Lives Matter claims that black women, children, and families are the victims of relentless state violence; that Black queer and trans folks bear a unique burden from a hetero-patriarchal society that disposes of them like garbage and simultaneously fetishizes them and profits from them; that “500,000 Black people in the U.S. are undocumented immigrants and relegated to the shadows;” that “Black girls are used as negotiating chips during times of conflict and war;” and that blacks living with disabilities and different abilities bear the burden of state sponsored Darwinian experiments that attempt to squeeze them into boxes of normality defined by white supremacy.

The allegations made by Black Lives Matters are as deluded as they are demented. The philosophy of BLM is best described as political insanity and moral depravity. Most rational, fact-based, intellectually-minded readers would disagree with both the problems described and the solutions proposed. Black women, children, and families are not perpetually persecuted in the United States. Although 80% of LBBTQ murder victims are minorities, an argument can be made that Queer and trans folks of all colours are more oppressed by violent macho homophobic black male society than by white “hetero-patriarchal society.”

While it is confirmed that there are more than 400,000 illegal black immigrants in the United States, it is preposterous to blame the State for a plight they chose to impose on themselves when they could have applied to immigrate legally or seek refugee status. It is like the Moroccan saying, “He hit me and then he cried.” These illegal aliens break U.S. immigration law and then blame the U.S. Moreover, illegal workers depress wages and hurts job prospects for African American men. According to Peter Kirsanow, a US Civil Rights Commissioner, “Black males are more likely to experience competition from illegal immigrants.”

As for “Black girls … used as negotiating chips during times of conflict and war,” what on earth does that have to do with the United States? Those are crimes committed by black Africans against black Africans. What is more, women of all colours are victimized during war. Unfortunately, Black Lives Matter cannot see beyond the surface. They care only about colour and blame all evils on whites without given them credit of any kind for their accomplishments. Rather than speak of white supremacy, we should speak of black envy of white excellence.

As for the claim that the State subjects disabled African Americans to “Darwinian experiments,” these are the words of paranoid people who suffer from serious delusions. There is no doubt that scientific experiments were conducted on a small number of African Americans without their consent in the 20th century; however, similar experiments were also conducted on American Indians, Caucasian Americans, and other communities.

Moreover, anyone who claims that black lives are “systematically and intentionally targeted for demise” in the United States requires a psychological assessment. America is not committing genocide against African Americans. At the very most, a segment of African American men are destroying themselves and their communities through self-destructive behaviour.

Simply because some of its overarching goals are sound does not mean that Black Lives Matter should be blindly and uncritically supported by Muslims. In fact, the movement has been accused of racism and violence by people of all colours. BLM activists openly incite violence against law enforcement officers. BLM activists openly express racist anti-white sentiments.

Yusra Khogali, a co-founder of Black Lives, Toronto, Canada, wrote that “white skin is sub-human,” that “white people are recessive genetic defects.” She even tweeted a prayer in which she asked Allah to keep her from killing white people.

Liberals, however, have responded to such hate speech by stating that it was perfectly justifiable when placed in the context of “oppression.” What oppression? Canada did not play a part in the slave-trade. Canada has never been an imperial power. Canada was a refuge for African Americans who escaped from slavery. It is evident that racist bigots like Yusra Khogali live in alternate universes, spewing venom in echo chambers of hatred, prejudice, and stereotypes.

A simple search of social media reveals a long litany of violently racist rants made by BLM leaders and followers who encourage robbery, rape, and white genocide. Consequently, it comes as no surprise that many political players, both domestic and international, have described Black Lives Matter as an anti-white, racist, terrorist organization.

Muslims should indeed be opposed to anti-black racism; however, they should also be opposed to anti-white racism unless, of course, they are idiotic enough to believe the Zuckerberg-sponsored Google claim that black people cannot be racist because racism requires power and privilege. This same argument is used by BLM supporters who argue that the sexual assault of white women by black men cannot be described as rape since rape requires power and privilege.

The supporters of Black Lives Matter include Muslims who now find themselves without domestic patronage. They are those who sided with Hillary and the Democrats out of fear of Trump. They are the same ones who earlier made an unholy connection with Obama, which had as its subtext a tacit tolerance for ISIS, or at least a lack of any motivation to vigorously denounce the Takfiris, since it must have been known that Obama and/or the CIA were to a certain degree supporting them. The forces who covertly brought us ISIS presented a Liberal face in this country.

The notion that Black Lives Matter is a true grassroots liberation movement like the Civil Rights Movement was, not a case of social engineering by Liberal ideologues and funding-sources, is something the Liberals believe in religiously. So, it comes as no surprise that those Muslims who seek Black Lives Matter as a true expression of Black liberation also see the Muslim Brotherhood in the same way. In the same way that Black Lives Matter presents itself as liberation movement, the Muslim Brotherhood presented themselves as democratic freedom fighters while, at the same time, they were engaged in burning Coptic Churches, sexually assaulting women on the streets, and murdering Shiite scholars. Liberals have swallowed this duplicity hook, line, and sinker.

The Black Lives Matter movement is not a popular uprising. It is the beneficiary of over 100 million dollars in funding from liberal foundations, including, $33 million dollars in grants from George Soros through his Open Society Foundation. Despite the “good intentions” of some of its supporters — blacks, whites, Hispanics, Muslims, immigrants, and women — Black Lives Matter overtly espouses racist and violent views and employs subversive street thugs and professional provocateurs for the benefit of billionaire globalists.

Black Lives Matter has reduced an ideological, socio-political, philosophical, and economic conflict of world proportion to a racial conflict that pits blacks against whites. The real conflict, however, is between the 99% and the 1 percenters, between Humanity and Inhumanity, between God and the Devil, between the overwhelming population of the world of all races and religions and the secular globalist Satanists who hoard virtually all the wealth in the world. It is a battle of belief: a war of morals and values.

The leaders of BLM embody all the evils of the New World Order. If some morally-damaged and ethically-challenged “Muslims” wish to march behind Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors, Opal Tometi, and Yusra Khogali, they can follow them all the ways to the depths of Hell. As for myself, I will follow in the footsteps of the Prophet Muhammad for the lawful and the prohibited apply until the ends of times.

Crescent International, however, had the audacity to claim that “For someone in Hamza Yusuf’s position to belittle the Black Lives Matter movement is not only demeaning and racist, it is completely antithetical to the values of Islam and the Sunnah of the noble Messenger.” Other Muslims activists have asserted that “Black Lives Matters is our movement.” Such people are pawns of the global elites.

Although many Muslims are willing to leap like lemmings, many Christians, both African American and otherwise, have not been deceived by the dark side of Black Lives Matter. And while they oppose prejudice and police brutality, they refuse to cast their lot with gangs of criminals, rapists, racists, globalists, secularists, communists, anarchists, Islamists, abortionists, man-hating feminazis, and LGBTQ activists.

As for criticizing the Muslim Brotherhood, a movement with Freemasonic foundations that received funding from the British, many sober-minded scholars consider it more palatable than blindly defending them and thereby sharing in their shortcomings and sins. Scholars can view the world scene from above, analyzing all parties, without necessarily taking sides. Being critical of the Muslim Brotherhood does not imply that one is supportive of Sisi.

As uncomfortable as it made some Muslims feel, Shaykh Hamza Yusuf also made another poignant point:

“We should all be against any ideologies of supremacy of one people over another people, it’s completely antithetical to our religion but we have some of the worst racism in our own communities… the anti-Jewish rhetoric that you hear in the Islamic community is horrific… do you know what it’s like to be a Pakistani in a lot of the Gulf States or from India or from Kerala even worse? People talk about white privilege, what about Arab privilege over non-Arabs in the Middle East?

Many Muslims are fond of blaming others. Blame the West! Blame the Jews! Although the West is to blame for certain wrongs and Israel is to blame for certain wrongs, Muslims should stop simply pointing the finger and start blaming themselves. Am I victim shaming? Absolutely not. I am holding people accountable for their own action or inaction.

Racism, discrimination, prejudice, sexism, classism, bias, stereotypes, and misogyny are present, to varying degrees, in many Muslim communities. It comes across as acutely hypocritical for Muslim immigrants to criticize the shortcomings of the West without also criticizing the shortcomings of their countries of origin. What’s good for the goose is good for the gander. Many Muslims can dish it out criticism but they clearly cannot take criticism.

As for hurling around accusations of “white privilege,” it is quite often a manifestation of reverse racism employed by envious and indolent individuals who wish to blame their failures on others. Are white people privileged? Some of them are: economically, socially, and educationally. Are all Caucasians the beneficiaries of “white privilege?” Certainly not. Economically-disadvantaged whites and working class whites may have some advantages over African-Americans who suffer from the same challenges, however, they do not get a free pass. In most cases, white success is not privilege: it is earned.

Apart from the globalist elite, all human beings are victims of the savage capitalistic system. In fact, it thrives by turning blacks against whites, whites against blacks, Muslims against Muslims, and non-Muslims against Muslims. The very concept of “white privilege” has been called into question by academics as a racist construct that confounds colour with social class. Although I would certainly not encourage Muslims to side with the extreme right-wing, they should seriously reconsider siding with radical leftist liberals and secularists and their degenerate social agenda.

As for his assertion that Islamists have turned Islam into a political ideology, Shaykh Hamza Yusuf is absolutely in the right. He has enough knowledge and sense of history to recognize that “Islamism” is not Islam; it is a gross overemphasis on the political components of Islam.

Shaykh Hamza Yusuf knows full well that politics play an important role in Islam and that the quest for social justice is at the centre of the faith; however, he also recognizes that the heart of Islam is spiritual. He knows, as any scholar does, that most of Islam revolves around moral and ethical development as opposed to the struggle for political power. He understands that Islam is to be built bottom up and that Allah does not change he condition of a people until they change what is in themselves.

Islam did not start with a State: it started with personal development and the quest for social justice. It was only after he built bona fide believers that the Prophet set out to establish a physical government. And despite Evans claims to the contrary, the Messenger of Allah did admonish the oppressed for their sins by promoting the good and forbidding the wrong.

Shaykh Hamza Yusuf is perfectly justified to criticize groups such as the Muslim Brotherhood, Hizb al-Tahrir, and al-Qaedah. At the same time, he is certainly cognizant that there is a huge difference between the Ikhwan al-Muslimin and Daesh. If Mehdi Hasan had sufficiently good manners and etiquette, I am convinced that Shaykh Hamza could have articulated his case more clearly. Unfortunately, and thankfully, the Shaykh does not speak in sound-bytes.

The Muslim Brotherhood may be “moderate” when compared to the likes of ISIS, but so are al-Qaedah and al-Nusra; however, there is no denying that many Ikhwanis have filled the ranks of ISIS in Libya, Tunisia, Egypt, Syria, and Iraq. There is no denying that the Ikhwan al-Muslimin legitimized the excommunication of Muslims in modern times. And there is no denying that Ayman al-Zawahiri, Osama ben Laden, and Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi are all the excrement of the Muslim Brotherhood.

The Muslim Brotherhood can be compared to marijuana, al-Qaedah to crack cocaine, and ISIS to meth. However, there is no denying that Salafism, in even its moderate forms, is the gateway drug to the most brutal, barbaric, and Satanic forms of Takfirism.

Should association with the Muslim Brotherhood be criminalized? Not any more than association with the Democratic and Republican Parties should be. (By the same token, criminal actions by members of any of these groups should not be ignored). Islamist movements form a spectrum ranging from relatively mild and benign social activists to straight-out psychopaths. Persecuting more moderate Islamists will only push people into the camp of the most extreme of extremists.

And rather than prosecuting partisans of Islamist groups based on guilt by association, how about going after those who created them in the first place? Whether it is the Muslim Brotherhood, the Afghan Mujahidin, the Taliban, al-Qaedah, Hamas, the GIA, al-Nusrah or ISIS, all so-called “Radical Islamists” and “Muslim” terrorists have received support from the enemies of Islam and their allies.

As for Yasir Qadhi, since when did he become infallible and unassailable? He is a man of no academic or scholarly importance with a long history of supporting Salafism and making inflammatory statements about Shiites. A cause of conflict and division among Muslims? You are damn right that he is.

Like all human beings, Shaykh Hamza Yusuf has no shortage of flaws. For some, he comes across as arrogant. For others, he has the warmth of a cactus. Be that as it may, the man is certainly not a racist, a bigot, or an unconscious and unavowed white supremacist. If he can be blamed for anything it is with surrounding himself with snakes for decades, false friends and hypocritical colleagues who turned on him treacherously like a pack of hyenas instead of engaging in dignified damage control and duly-deserved defense. And Allah knows best.

Source*

Related Topics:

ISIS Targets Sheikh Hamza Yusuf*

#Arabs4BlackPower Releases Movement for Black Lives Solidarity Statement*

Nixon Advisor Admitted War on Drugs Invented to Crush Anti-War and Black Movements*

Assata Shakur: FBI’s Most Wanted After Thirty-Four Years!

Appeals Court Supports FBI Policy of Entrapping Individuals to Plot Acts of Terrorism*

The Black Stereotype: Socially Engineered in theFBI War on Tupac Shakur and Real Black Leaders*

Black Wall Street*

Yellow Journalism, and the Truth Behind the Jonestown Massacre*

Crispus Attucks: A Black and Native Shared Narrative*

Black History Month and Muslims

Harriet Tubman Home Becomes National Historical Park*

Atlanta Mayor rejects Demand to end Israel Police Training*

Mass Incarceration: Behind the Ferguson Uprising*

Soros Turned Ferguson from a Local Protest to a National Flashpoint*

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Deputy Police Chief Identified as KKK by the FBI*

Deputy Police Chief Identified as KKK by the FBI*

By Scott Kaufman

Police morale in Fruitland Park, Florida has been shaken after a deputy chief and officer resigned when the Federal Bureau of Investigations identified them as members of the Ku Klux Klan.

The Florida Department of Law Enforcement presented Chief Terry Isaacs with copies of a confidential FBI report last week that allegedly identified Deputy Chief David Borst and Officer George Hunnewell as members of the KKK.

Earlier this year, a Florida Klan leader boasted to WFTV 9 that the organization has “police officers, paramedics, judges…everywhere.”

However, Chief Isaacs would only tell reporters for the Orlando Sentinel that the pair belonged to a “subversive organization,” because he did not believe he was authorized to release the results of the report.

“It’s a tough situation. He was my assistant,” he said, adding that he never witnessed any behavior that would lead him to believe former Deputy Chief Borst was in the KKK. “But I’ve read the report, and it’s convincing.”

Chief Deputy State Attorney Ric Ridgway – from whom Isaacs sought counsel concerning the FBI’s report – told the Orlando Sentinel that “it’s not a crime to be a member of the KKK, even if you are the deputy chief. It’s not a crime to be stupid. It’s not a crime to hate people. It may be despicable, it may be immoral, but it’s not a crime.”

The loss of two officers is significant for a town that only employs 13 full-time cops.

“They’re a good group of people,” Isaacs said.

“The last thing I was expecting to hear in the year 2014 was for a professional law-enforcement officer to be a member of a subversive organization.”

In 2009, however, another Fruitland Park officer, James Elkins, resigned after pictures emerged online of him wearing a Klan hood and robe. Elkins initially claimed that he was not involved with the organization, but eventually admitted that he was the “district Kleage,” or local recruiter, for the National Aryan Knights of the Ku Klux Klan.

Source*

Related Topics:

KKK Set Alight a 20 Year Old Woman!*

White Supremacist Finds Out He Is Part Black*

Killer Cop on the Rise

Call the Cops at Your Peril*

Obama’s Policed State

Malcolm X’s Grandson Baited and Killed

Written By A Cop: Facing Crime

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings*

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings*

By Jessica Goldstein

When I was an undergrad, Maya Angelou came to my school to give the keynote address for Women’s Week. I remember everyone waiting for her, futzing around on our phones and talking about what we were doing that weekend and then, cutting clean through the clamor, Angelou walked onstage and started to sing: “Oh when the saints, go marching in…”

Everyone stopped and listened. You couldn’t not listen. That voice.

It’s maybe one of the most well-traveled voices in American history. After a nearly five-year period of silence during her childhood—in the aftermath of the murder of the man who raped her, Angelou feared she had a voice that could kill—Angelou spent a lifetime speaking out. Her voice bounced around empty hotel rooms where she escaped to write in solitude; she’d lie across the bed, art dismantled from the walls to eliminate even the slightest distraction, and refuse to let maids change the sheets on the grounds that she never slept there. Her voice carried through San Francisco, from the streetcars to the Purple Onion nightclub. She gave commencement addresses, recited poetry at a presidential inauguration. You could hear her voice on Oprah. You could hear her voice singing on Sesame Street.

Her voice has an almost mythical quality. In her death, it seems to be even louder than it was in her lifetime. Dwan Reece, curator of music and performing arts for the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, talked to me by phone today about the enduring power and reach of Angelou’s voice.

For people who don’t remember what American literature was like before Angelou came on the scene, can you put her contributions in context? What was missing from that space that her voice brought?
I think she really brought something to the nature of autobiography, and really putting the stories of African Americans, and African American women front and center, and really announcing who she was and what her experiences were, the kind of the social and cultural descriptions: what her life was like, the environment she grew up in.

Was that a risky move at the time? Were the stories she was telling taboo in any way?
The risk may have been in finding the amount of readers. I think, because in the landscape, it hadn’t been done before and reached the wide acceptance that it did before, she was the right time, the right person, to make this breakthrough for autobiography.

How did people respond to I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings initially? Was it well-received right away, or did it take time to gain national acceptance?
I think the initial reception [to the book] was very positive. I think, arguably, most people really felt that particular piece was her best work. There’s also this phrase thrown out, this idea of autobiographical fiction, and some people like to describe her work in that way, in a somewhat derivative sense… that she brought some of the stylistic techniques of fiction in telling her own story. I know, reading the book for the first time, there was a certain beauty in the prose, not just the historic retelling but a narrative that presented a three-dimensional experience of a young girl and a young adult, and an older woman. So representing black women’s lives as they really are, I wouldn’t say it was taboo, but it was perfectly honest. [There was] an honesty in what she was willing to tell that may not have been accepted at the time.

What do you think the reaction would be like if that book were published tomorrow? Modern readers seem to be pretty unforgiving of non-fiction writers who are found to have fictionalized parts of their work.
On one level, I don’t think it would be scandalous because people are more honest and forthright in their writing, because people are willing to take chances. But that question of what is fiction, what is truth, we do run into that in works of literature. There’s always a literature scandal, so to speak. But I think we’re more allowed to take liberties in the retelling of our stories. People are more accepting.

For a writer who is so a part of the highly respected literary world, Angelou was so game to participate in mainstream culture—the kinds of things other “highbrow” writers might consider beneath them: appearing on popular television shows, partnering with Hallmark. Why do you think she was so drawn to that?
It’s interesting that you say that. I never thought of her as highbrow or beyond reach of the average reader, and I’m trying to think why. I think a lot of that has to do with her voice. The accessibility of a one-person narrative, I can’t say that enough… The directness of her language, the beauty of her prose, the reflection of human emotions and responses, and all of that framed within the arc of American history. Her books were not just the narrative of one person, but the narrative of American social and cultural history as it evolved over time. So I think those kinds of things are more accessible to the general reader. They can see themselves in her story, either as a witness or as a participant.

I ask in part because there are certainly high-profile writers who appear to want nothing to do with mainstream pop culture. I’m thinking of the whole Jonathan Franzen/Oprah tiff, when she tried to pick The Corrections as a book club selection and he didn’t want anything to do with it. Even though he ended up relenting and being on the show, that was revealing to me. I remember thinking, “Well, if it’s good enough for Maya Angelou, why is it beneath you?”
I wouldn’t think she felt that [Oprah’s audience] was beneath her. I think she was about communicating with humanity. You look at the many quotes, today, how everyone is responding to her passing. It’s walking a fine line, and she definitely did that. She was able to pursue her art in the way that she chose, and also talk to people. To me, if you write and have high mindedness and goals, and you’re not read by anyone, I wouldn’t say your work is less valuable, but are people really engaging with what you have to say? And I think people were engaged from the day she was first published to the day she died, and they were moved by her. And in that sense, she kind of set an example, for many writers today, particularly African American women writers…While it’s hard to walk that middle line, it can be done. And I think most authors want to be read, and want people to engage with what they have to say, whether positive or negative, because that’s how you know it hit a chord. She hit a chord with America—with the world over—and if she’s a child of the African diaspora, she’s a child of everything. She truly was a Renaissance woman.

What about her partnership with Hallmark? That’s kind of the ultimate high art/low art mash-up.
To me it’s a writer making a deal and getting her work out there. I’m not denigrating Hallmark, but she elevated it. She brought a certain gravitas. To put a Maya Angelou quote in a card, to express something to someone, it gave something more to it, as far as I’m concerned.

Getting your work out there, that’s part of the challenge… This is the way that we engage. Not all of us read books; not all of us listen to poetry. Not all of us read newspapers. But if you get enough places out there, someone’s going to connect with it.

She even joined Twitter! I’ve seen so many people retweeting her old messages all day today.
The reaction, this outpouring of respect that she’s getting from all walks of life, is kind of an anthropological experiment—to see how people respond when someone passes away, it’s just [so] telling.

I think there’s a big sense of loss, not only in the person but what she represented. And [people are] hoping she can carry on. A lot of people circulate her quotes, they talk about humanity, how their heart is breaking over her loss. She really reached a generation, or two.

When it comes to just pure name recognition—the ubiquity of who Angelou was, her work, and what she stood for—how many other writers have ever reached that level?
I’m going to venture to guess that very few, and it touches upon what I mentioned earlier, about her ability to reach people. I also think that there’s a resonance for women that can’t be overstated, of women speaking up. The voice, to me, that was what caught my imagination. And it wasn’t just her literal voice, it was a figurative and spiritual voice as well. The sense of agency that she brought to her work, and everything that she did. Illuminating injustices, sharing of herself, celebrating culture, and asserting her right to be a woman, and to be a strong woman in a masculine world is, I think, very influential.

Angelou delivered a poem at Bill Clinton’s first inauguration, making her only the second poet to do so, after Robert Frost recited a poem for Kennedy. What did that honor mean for her, as a cultural icon?
It cemented her—it didn’t even just cement her as part of the American story, it cemented everyone she has represented and spoken for, in her life and in her writing. She finally arrived, and we, too, are part of the story. It’s probably the same sentiment people felt when Barack Obama was inaugurated for the first time, to see her participating in something like this. Given the history of this country, the racism and oppression, and she being a child of some of its worst, lowest points. For her to be writing this poem to the President of the United States, representing the people of the United States, it felt wonderful, and life-affirming in some ways. And everything she did represented this sense of possibility, because she was always trying something new.

How will she be represented in the National Museum of African American History and Culture, when in opens? (The museum is slated to open by 2015).
Her story touches upon several places in the History Gallery, particularly in the ‘60s and beyond, and in the Cultural Gallery, our Cultural Expressions Gallery, our Musicians Gallery, our Taking the Stage Gallery. The breadth of her work covers so much. She’s one of these unique figures in African American culture and history. There’s no question that she will be represented. She represents a certain layer of wisdom that people have called upon over time and will call upon in the future.

Did you ever get the chance to meet her?
No, I did not… I will say that I was so affected by her when I read her books, over a series of time in my late twenties, that after I did, I named my first child after her. I know the seed was planted with me. You look at the reaction overall, people are affected. I hope that we continue to be moved by her work.

Your daughter’s name is Maya?
My daughter’s name is Maya. I wanted her to have something to grow into and live up to.

Source*

Related Topics:

Stepping Back to Afrika!

Dr. Frances Cress Welsing: 12 Years a Slave, Racism & Black Cowardice

The Black Stereotype: Socially Engineered in the FBI War on Tupac Shakur and Real Black Leaders*

“THAT Would be Reverse Racism”

The Paths of Return

Court Order: The Re-Education of Lauryn Hill for Speaking the Truth!

The Truth Behind the Emancipation Proclamation!*

Malcolm X: The Truth Seeker*

White Supremacist Finds Out He Is Part Black*

 

Labelled as One of the Most Racist Countries, Egyptian – Nubian Clashes Break Out*

Labelled as One of the Most Racist Countries, Egyptian – Nubian Clashes Break Out*

 

At least 25 people have been killed in a tourist city in southern Egypt following four days of clashes between local ethnic groups, according to government officials.

Fighting began on Friday in Aswan between Arab and Nubian families and continued over the weekend despite Egypt’s prime minister and chief of police travelling to the area to co-ordinate the state’s response.

Violence had subsided by Sunday evening – but not before dozens had been shot or stabbed, leaving 25 dead and 56 injured. Photographs from the city – known for its rich pharaonic history – showed homes and cars torched and looted.

An army spokesman claimed on social media that the violence was sparked by the Muslim Brotherhood – a common government claim after outbreaks of violence. But two Aswan residents said by phone that the tensions were localised, and stemmed from an argument between students from a local Arab family and one from Aswan’s long-marginalised Nubian community.

Reports differed as to who struck first. But one Nubian resident claimed that members of an Arab clan – the Haleyla – had daubed anti-Nubian graffiti on a wall on Thursday, after a group of Nubian students walked through their neighbourhood to get to school.

“They wrote some provocative phrases on the walls, saying that they are the masters of the place,” said tourism worker Abdallah Ghareeb Madany, who claimed members of the Haleyla later returned and started firing at local Nubians, killing at least one.

The next day, said Madany, the Nubian community retaliated – entering a Haleyla area and killing “whoever they could find”. Twenty-four hours later, members of the Haleyla responded in kind in a Nubian area – with accounts suggesting that the police had done too little to quell the violence.

Nubian people lived historically in southern Egypt and northern Sudan, and have their own dialect and traditions. In Egypt, the community has long felt ostracised after being forcibly displaced from their homeland by a series of evictions throughout the 20th century – most notably by the construction of the Aswan dam in the 1960s, a move that upended their lives and culture.

Attempting to contextualise the recent Aswan violence, prominent Nubian writer Hagag Odul wrote on social media:

“The four displacements shocked our existence especially the displacement of 1964 that removed us from our roots around the banks of the Nile and threw us in the desert among armed groups… We were insulted, and called black and barbaric.

“We had to be like them, to carry guns and threaten to use them in order to defend [ourselves], in order to be citizens like other citizens.”

Source*

Related Topics:

Egypt Consolidates Israeli Relations*

Egypt Sentences 529 to Death*

Jailed Egyptian Children Moved to ‘torture camp’*

Race: Making a Difference in the World*

Race: Making a Difference in the World*

Related Topics:

Big Banks Guilty of Charging Higher Rates to African Americans and Hispanics*

Dr. Frances Cress Welsing: 12 Years a Slave, Racism & Black Cowardice

Black Gold

Sentenced: Bribed to Send Black Kids to Jail*

White Supremacist Finds Out He Is Part Black*

Fourteen Caribbean Nations Demand Reparation from Colonial Britain*

Fourteen Caribbean Nations Demand Reparation from Colonial Britain*

By Matt Blake

More than 150 years after Europe abolished slavery, the Caribbean is preparing to sue Britain for its part in the wholesale trade of human beings.

A coalition of Caribbean leaders will meet today in St. Vincent to discuss a landmark legal claim for reparations – that could run into the hundreds of billions of pounds – for a legacy that many say still lingers across the palm-fringed archipelago.

A map shows the main transatlantic slave trade out of Africa during the slave trade from 1500-1900

A map shows the main transatlantic slave trade out of Africa during the slave trade from 1500-1900

Caricom, a group of 12 former British colonies together with the former French colony Haiti and the Dutch-held Suriname, believes Europe should pay for a range of issues spawned by slavery, from poverty and illiteracy to ill health.

But is says the UK in particular should pay the most even though it was the first to abolish slavery in 1833.

The case has been prepared by a British law firm that recently won almost £20million compensation for hundreds of Kenyans tortured by the British colonial government during the Mau Mau rebellion of the 1950s.

Today’s claim, which also targets Spain, Portugal, Norway, Sweden and Denmark, comes at a pertinent time for the issue of slavery – just a week after Steve McQueen’s epic 12 Years A Slave won the Oscar for Best Picture in Los Angeles.

‘Over ten million Africans were stolen from their homes and forcefully transported to the Caribbean as the enslaved chattels and property of Europeans,’ the claim says. ‘The transatlantic slave trade is the largest forced migration in human history and has no parallel in terms of man’s inhumanity to man.’

It continues: ‘This trade in enchained bodies was a highly successful commercial business for the nations of Europe.

‘The lives of millions of men, women and children were destroyed in the search of profit. Over ten million Africans were imported into the Caribbean during the 400 years of slavery.

‘At the end of slavery in the late 19th century, less than two million remained. The chronic health condition of Caribbean blacks constitutes the greatest financial risk to sustainability in the region.’

Caricom has not specified how much money they are seeking but senior officials have pointed out that Britain paid slave owners £20 million when it abolished slavery in 1834. That sum would be the equivalent of £200 billion today.

Britain currently contributes about £15million a year in aid to the Caribbean through Department for International Development in a drive to further develop ‘wealth creation’.

The subject of reparations has simmered in the Caribbean for many years and opinions are divided. Some see reparations as delayed justice, while others see it as an empty claim and a distraction from modern social problems in Caribbean societies.

Slavery ended throughout the Caribbean in the 1800s in the wake of slave revolts, and left many of the region’s plantation economies in tatters.

If the leaders decide to go ahead, a legal complaint will be filed against European states, possibly opening the way for formal negotiations.

‘Undoubtedly, Britain faces more claims than anyone else because it was the primary slave power and colonial power in the Caribbean,’ Martyn Day, the British lawyer advising the Caribbean nations, said in an interview. ‘Britain will be very much at the forefront.’

Britain’s government is aware of the proposed legal action, the Foreign Office said.

‘Slavery was and is abhorrent. The United Kingdom unreservedly condemns slavery and is committed to eliminating it,’ a spokesperson said, adding that reparations are not the answer. ‘Instead, we should concentrate on identifying ways forward with a focus on the shared global challenges that face our countries in the 21st century.’

Legal experts, however, say the lawsuit would be a long shot at best.

‘There is no legal basis for a claim for reparations,’ Robert A. Sedler, a professor at Wayne State University Law School, said.

‘Slavery was legal at the time, and international law was not a part of the law of the European states. Moreover, a long period of time has passed, and all the victims of slavery are long dead,’ he added.

Some reparations cases have popped up in the United States over the last decade, but no one has been awarded compensation.

However, if negotiations open ‘the European nations might decide to apologize for slavery and to provide some financial assistance to the Caribbean nations,’ Sedler said.

The legal strategy rests on the fact that the European states targeted by Caricom have all signed the International Convention on the Elimination of All Racial Discrimination, which makes it ‘a duty to do all in their power to eradicate racial discrimination,’ said Day.

The Caribbean effort is being led by Ralph Gonsalves, prime minister of St. Vincent and the Grenadines, who has doggedly pursued the issue for the last four years.

When Gonsalves found out last year that London’s High Court ordered the British government to pay compensation to survivors of Kenya’s Mau Mau uprising, he contacted Day, whose law firm Leigh Day, represented the Mau Mau.

The British government paid £19.9 million ($33 million) to 5,228 survivors of torture during Kenya’s 1950s Mau Mau uprising, and formally acknowledged that ‘Kenyans were subject to torture and other forms of ill treatment and that these abuses took place and that they marred Kenya’s progress towards independence.’

Gonsalves said slavery so traumatised society in Caribbean countries that they have still not fully recovered.

The reparations claim takes into account what its authors say are slavery-related chronic diseases such as hypertension and Type 2 diabetes, widespread illiteracy, the lack of museums and research centers for Caribbean history, the lack of respect for African culture and identity, continuing psychological effects of centuries of slavery, and the lack of scientific and technical know-how to compete in the global economy.

In December 2013, the Caricom Reparations Commission decided on six factors for the claim: public health, education, cultural institutions, cultural deprivation, psychological trauma, and scientific and technological backwardness.

Estimates vary as to how many were enslaved. According to the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database, the British Caribbean had 2.3 million slaves, the French Caribbean had 1.1 million, the Spanish Americas had 1.3 million and the Dutch Americas had about 445,000.

Slaves laboured mainly in sugar and coffee plantations and were forced to work around the clock in the fields during harvest, according to Kathleen Monteith, head of the History and Archeology Department at the University of the West Indies.

The international convention against discrimination says significant attempts should be made to solve matters amicably but if no resolution is reached the Caribbean nations can take their case to the International Court of Justice.

Day hopes to present formal complaints to the European states at the end of June. If a European state were to refuse a Caribbean nation’s request for talks on its particular claims, then a formal legal complaint would be made.

‘The Western powers will at least give a sympathetic ear,’ he said. ‘The knee-jerk reaction will be to say no (but) Western powers will want to be seen as dealing sensitively with this.’

Source*

Related Topics:

Jamaica’s PM Calls for  Reparation

The Doctrine of Discovery

Joint Statement on UN Declaration and the Doctrine Of Discovery

UK to Pay £20m compensation to Mau Mau Victims*

France is Broke, but Still Reaping from the Colonial Tax!*

Haiti: The Divine Right to Enslave Others*

Brazil: The Colour of Eugenics*

Dr. Frances Cress Welsing: 12 Years a Slave, Racism & Black Cowardice

Black Women Targeted with Eugenics Drug*

Rabbi Admits Jewish Role in the African Slave Trade*

Bertrand Russell on the Manipulation of Society*

Big Banks Guilty of Charging Higher Rates to African Americans and Hispanics*

The Imperial Vultures to Gather for the U.S.-Africa Summit*

A Reminder Why South African Mineworkers have a Right to Strike*

Malcolm X: The Truth Seeker*

Senegal Farmers Tell Transnational Corporations to get off their Land*

Sworn Testimony from Ex-CIA Pilot No Planes Hit the Twin Towers

Sworn Testimony from Ex-CIA Pilot No Planes Hit the Twin Towers*

 

By Ron Baitley-Simens

A former CIA and civilian pilot has sworn an affidavit, stating that no planes flew into the Twin Towers as it would have been physically impossible.

John Lear, the son of Learjet inventor, Bill Lear, has given his expert evidence that it would have been physically impossible for Boeing 767s, like Flights AA11 and UA175 to have hit the Twin Towers on 9/11, particularly when flown by inexperienced pilots:

‘No Boeing 767 airliners hit the Twin Towers as fraudulently alleged by the government, media, NIST and its contractors’, he stated in the affidavit.

‘Such crashes did not occur because they are physically impossible as depicted, for the following reasons: in the case of UAL 175 going into the south tower, a real Boeing 767 would have begun ‘telescoping’ when the nose hit the 14 inch steel columns which are 39 inches on center.

‘The vertical and horizontal tail would have instantaneously separated from the aircraft, hit the steel box columns and fallen to the ground.

‘The engines when impacting the steel columns would havemaintained their general shape and either fallen to the ground or been recovered in the debris of the collapsed building.

‘No Boeing 767 could attain a speed of 540 mph at 1000 feet above sea level ‘parasite drag doubles with velocity’ and ‘parasite power’ cubes with velocity.

The fan portion of the engine is not designed to accept the volume of dense air at that altitude and speed.

The piece of alleged external fuselage containing 3 or 4 window cutouts is inconsistent with an airplane that hit 14 inch steel box columns, placed at over 500 mph.  It would have crumpled.

No significant part of the Boeing 767 or engine could have penetrated the 14 inch steel columns and 37 feet beyond the massive core of the tower without part of it falling to the ground.

‘The debris of the collapse should have contained massive sections of the Boeing 767, including 3 engine cores weighing approximately 9000 pounds apiece which could not have been hidden. Yet there is no evidence of any of these massive structural components from either 767 at the WTC. Such complete disappearance of 767s is impossible.

The affidavit, dated 28th January 2014 is part of a law suit being pursued byMorgan Reynolds in the United States District Court, Southern District, New York.

In March 2007, Reynolds, a former chief economist under the George W Bush administration filed a Request For Correction with the US National Institute of Science and Technology citing his belief that real commercial jets (Boeings) did not hit the WTC towers.

Although the 9/11 Truth movement initially rejected the ‘no-planes’ theory as too outlandish, after scientific and rational analysis, it has become a widely accepted explanation of the evidence collected.


Unlike any other form of statement, an affidavit becomes truth in law, if it is not rebutted.  It will now be up to critics of the theory to present their evidence and analysis to rebut the statement point by point.  If they do not – or cannot – then the US government will be obliged to admit that the account given by the 9/11 Commission is wrong.

The 65 year old retired airline captain and former CIA pilot – who has over 19,000 hours of flight time — also drew attention to the inexperience of the pilots who allegedly flew the planes:

‘The alleged ‘controlled’ descent into New York on a relatively straight course by a novice pilot in unlikely in the extreme because of the difficulty of controlling heading, descent rate and descent speed within the parameters of ‘controlled’ flight.

‘It takes a highly skilled pilot to interpret the “EFIS” (Electronic Flight Instrument Display) display, with which none of the hijacker pilots would have been familiar or received training on, and use his controls, including the ailerons, rudder, elevators, spoilers and throttles to effect, control and maintain a descent.

Lear has, according to his sworn statement, flown over 100 different types of planes during his 40 years of flying and holds more FAA airman certificates than any other FAA certificated airman. He flew secret missions for the CIA in Southeast Asia, Eastern Europe, the Middle East and Africa between 1967 and 1983 then spent 17 years working for several passenger and cargo airlines as Captain, Check Airman and Instructor.

He is a member of Pilotfor911truth.org, which has consistently shown that it was impossible for jet airliners to have hit the Twin Towers in the way the 9/11 Commission has suggested.

Source*

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