Tag Archive | self awareness

The Science of Melanin*

The Science of Melanin*

By Dr. Karl Maret

 

Related Topics:

The Self Control Gland and Fasting

The Human Body Emits, Communicates with, and is Made from Light*

Does Skin Pigment Act Like A Natural Solar-Panel?*

The Self Control Gland and Why It Matters

Once Only Blacks Were Enslaved, Now We All Are*

Heavenly Signs: The Soul of Our Sun

Schoolgirl Found Hanged after Developing Allergic Reaction to School Wi-Fi*

Conscientious Scientists Make an Int’l Appeal on the Wide-scale Problem of Wi-fi*

He Survived Hiroshima and Nagasaki*

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Yoga and Meditation literally “repair” your DNA to Eliminate Disease and Depression*

Yoga and Meditation literally “repair” your DNA to Eliminate Disease and Depression*

By Vicki Batts

Balancing activities like Tai Chi, yoga and meditation are touted for their ability to promote a sense of well-being and reduce stress, but is there more to it than meets the eye? While these exercises are known for being great ways to relax, new research has shown that their benefits extend far past the ephemeral. The relief mind-body interventions can offer isn’t just mental; in fact, these activities can actually bring about physical changes at the molecular level.

A recent study led by scientists from Coventry University and Radboud University have shown that mind-body interventions can turn back molecular reactions within your DNA that cause disease and depression.

The study’s lead researcher Ivana Buric, from the Brain, Belief and Behaviour Lab in Coventry University’s Centre for Psychology, Behaviour and Achievement, commented,

“These activities are leaving what we call a molecular signature in our cells, which reverses the effect that stress or anxiety would have on the body by changing how our genes are expressed. Put simply, MBIs [mind-body interventions] cause the brain to steer our DNA processes along a path which improves our wellbeing.”

Buric also noted that millions of people are already reaping the benefits of mind-body exercises like yoga and Tai Chi, without even realizing how truly beneficial these activities are for their bodies. Buric states that while more studies still need to be done to fully ascertain the scope of what mind-body intervention can do, she believes that their research is a key building block for future research efforts.

Published in the journal Frontiers in Immunology, their study analyzes more than a decades’ worth of research on how mind-body intervention strategies can impact the behavior of DNA. Genetic expression was a focal point of the team’s research, because the way genes are activated to produce proteins can have a system-wide impact. The biological composition of the brain, body and immune system can all be affected by the way genetic proteins are expressed.

In total, the team reviewed 18 studies with a combined 846 participants. The experts determined that when looked at as a whole, the 11 years of data “reveal a pattern in the molecular changes which happen to the body as a result of MBIS [mind-body interventions], and how those changes benefit our mental and physical health.”

It’s known that when a person undergoes a stressful event, their body goes into what’s often known as the “flight or fight” response. This process also triggers the production of a molecule that regulates gene expression, known as nuclear factor kappa B, or NF-kB.

“NF-kB translates stress by activating genes to produce proteins called cytokines that cause inflammation at cellular level,” as Science Daily explains.

While this reaction is useful temporarily, when it is consistent over time, it can be quite damaging and increase the risk of diseases like cancer and disorders like depression. It can even accelerate the aging process.

However, the research team found that people who practice mind-body interventions on a regular basis showcase a reduction in the production of NF-kB and related cytokines. In turn, this leads to a decrease and reversal of pro-inflammatory gene expression. Ultimately, this lowers the risk of inflammation-related conditions.

Past research on meditation and other similar activities has also indicated that these exercises can have far-reaching effects on the brain and body. For example, recent research has shown that meditation can help keep your brain youthful and on average, reduce “brain age” by over seven years.  Earlier this year, a research team from Harvard University also found that yoga can elicit positive changes in metabolic function.

These mind-body activities are clearly a force to be reckoned with.

Source*

Related Topics:

NWO’s Version of Yoga Stirring up a Frenzy*

Yoga, Race and ‘Colour Blindness’*

How Art Can Heal Mental Illness*

The Ancient Power of Chanting (Mantra) Validated by Modern Science*

Nepal’s Military Set to Use Transcendental Meditation to Relieve Global Collective Stress and Stop War*

Meditation Does More for You Than Keep You Calm!

The Brain Connection: Prayer and Meditation

RFID Monitoring and DNA Profiles Unite*

Meet the Hidden Second Layer of Information in Your DNA*

Le Moulinet: Indigenous French Muslims

Le Moulinet:  Indigenous French Muslims

The amazing, first-time visual documentation of a handful of French families living in seclusion in secular France, after having converted to Shi’a Islam

 

Related Topics:

Russia and Islam*

Anti-Islam Marches in U.S. Fail to Draw Participants*

New Jersey Town Settles Religious Discrimination Lawsuit With Islamic Group for $3.25mn*

Austrian President calls on All Women to Wear Hijab in Solidarity with Muslims against Islamophobia*

Islam and Martial Arts: China’s Hui Muslim Tradition*

Islamists Attack Christmas, But Europeans Abolish It*

Islamic Spirituality and the Needs of Humanity Today*

A Video Game about the Mathematical Beauty of Islamic Art*

Islamic Culture before Western Meddling*

Ottomans saved Hungarian PM’s Ancestors; but Denies Islam was Part of Europe*

Wahhabism on Trial? How Islam is challenging Al Saud’s Custodianship of Mecca*

The Relentless Jewish Campaign against Islam*

Top 10 Ways Islamic Law Forbids Terrorism*

Post-Ramadhan Renewal: 5 Lessons to Live By

Post-Ramadhan Renewal: 5 Lessons to Live By

 

Related Topics:

The Centre of Consciousness is One’s Heart*

Prophet Muhammed (SAW) on Ramadhan

The Inner Technology of Islam

God-consciousness After Ramadhan

Night Prayer and the Human Body Clock

Arguing God from Being?

Atheists, Whatever They Say to the Contrary, Really Do Believe in God*

The Student and the Atheist Professor

The aql is not Reason – it’s Consciousness*

Rumi on Trusting Yourself*

Ramadhan Reflections: Memorizing the Qur’an is Not Enough

Courage to Create Good in the World*

I’m a Pakistani Hindu. So what Business do I have Missing Eid?

I’m a Pakistani Hindu. So what Business do I have Missing Eid?

By Nisha Pinjani

Last summer during Ramadhan, I shared the Shan Masala Eid commercial like Pakistanis all over the world. The ad showed two brothers spending the occasion away from home. For the purposes of the advert, a simple plate of Sindhi biryani was the balm to their feeling of homesickness.

This year, I found myself in the characters’ shoes.

Away from Pakistan for my graduate studies in Honolulu, Hawaii, I was scrolling through Facebook when I found the usual Eid-related posts flooding my timeline.

Unending stories about tailors and broken promises, event pages for chand raat meet­-ups, and the perpetual confusion on whether the next day would be Eid or another Roza (followed promptly by jokes at the Ruet­-i-­Hilal committee’s expense).

Soon enough, WhatsApp groups were abuzz with ‘Chand Mubarak’ wishes. While my friends in Karachi made plans to grab chai on the eve before Eid, I was literally stuck on an island. Sitting alone in my dorm room, I couldn’t help but feel blue — I missed home, my friends and my family.

I found myself thinking back to the Shan commercial. But while the ad’s protagonist and I were experiencing similar homesickness, we were quite dissimilar. He was a Muslim man from Pakistan; I am Pakistani Hindu woman.

What business do I have missing Eid?

Growing up as a Hindu in an Islamic republic is full of contradictions. My mother is often hesitant and wary of my Muslim friends. A bit strange, considering she is more than happy if I invite them to our home.

Perhaps this perplexing attitude is passed down through generations. As a young girl I loved listening to my grandfather’s partition stories. He would tell us incidents where Muslims went door-to-door killing any Hindu in sight (I’m sure Muslims grow up with similar stories of cold-blooded Hindus).

But then, he would also talk about his Muslim neighbours. The ones who protected our family, who made a human chain around our house when the riots broke out.

The obvious takeaway here was that good and bad people exist everywhere. But my grandfather’s stories carried an underlying warning: you can get close to Muslims, but remember that you are not one of them (and they know it too).

Following this tradition of mixed messages, every Ramadhan, many Hindus living in Pakistan fast. My mother herself happily sets an alarm to wake my sister up for sehri. She prepares an elaborate sehri, and reminiscent of the Thadri festival — where Hindus fast — her fried lolis make an appearance at the table.

No one else in my house wakes up with them, but we make it a point to join in for Iftar, and jokingly try to convince my sister that eating five minutes before the adhan is acceptable.

And then comes Eid. At least in Pakistan, Eid and Diwali have much in common. Both are marked by an abundance of mithai. It is customary to wear new clothes if one can afford them, and like Eidi on Eid, it is traditional to give presents on Diwali too. Every year, my family welcomes our friends over for Diwali, and come Eid, we visit our Muslim friends’ houses.

Yet, each time a story breaks of another Hindu girl being kidnapped and forcefully converted, my interactions with male Muslim friends start causing my mother distress. “Be careful around Muslim boys,” she warns me. It is frustrating, but I can see where she is coming from.

When I heard news of the Hindu reporter in Karachi who was forced to drink from a separate glass, my blood boiled. Sitting thousands of miles away, I was instantly transported back to my childhood when something similar happened to me (and I am sure, many religious minorities like me): a classmate had refused to share utensils with me because I was Hindu.

Children’s acts are a reflection of what they are taught at home. Many years later, seeing this news was a bitter reminder that even among supposedly educated, well-knowing adults, prejudice is alive and well.

The white in the flag

I have long known that despite having the same nationality, my Muslim friends back home and I are different in many ways.

During Pakistan Studies classes in school, teachers would make irresponsible claims about how Hindus were single-handedly responsible for the loss of Muslim lives. Reduced to a ‘cow-worshipper’ during the lectures, I would suddenly be othered, excluded, bullied.

As I grew up, my ‘otherness’ interestingly became exotic. The same identity I had been bullied over now became my ticket to being a ‘cool kid’— since I had access to all the firecrackers (thank you, Diwali), and invitations to holi parties.

As we grew up underneath the layers of systemically taught hate, my Muslim friends and I began to find common ground, and developed a better understanding of each other. I would sneak them into our temples so they could get a glimpse of my world, and accompany them to Mughal­ era mosques to get a sense of theirs.

I still come across a simpleton or two who wants me to prove my Pakistani-ness. Every time Pakistan plays a cricket match against India, there is always that one guy who wants to know, “How come you’re not supporting the Indian team instead?”

Thankfully, more often than not, my friends take over the task of shutting such bigotry down.

I keep thinking back to my family enjoying their long Eid break in Pakistan. We are a huge family, and most of my cousins are older, working people. On Diwali (a working day for most Pakistani Hindus until recently) we are usually only able to manage a dinner, however, the longer Eid holidays are quality family time for us.

During Eid, we get together at a farmhouse or the beach. We laze around playing cards, barbecuing, and catching up on gossip. Eid mornings mean waking up to seviyan and other breakfast treats, with my uncles over, watching the news and discussing the current state of affairs in Karachi.

Away from home, I find myself missing it all. Whether it is the memory of spending time with my family by the waves; or the calming sound of the adhan; or Eid plans with my friends to get mehendi.

Home, after all, is home, no matter how dysfunctional.

And so, on the first day of Eid in Hawaii, not unlike the characters in the Shan Masala advert, I picked up a packet of seviyan from a desi store here. I looked up the recipe online, managing to burn half the packet, and cursed myself for never waking up early with my mother to help out.

But my friends came over and made custard and fruit salad. I ended up spending the day recreating what Eid has always been about for me back home in Pakistan: good company, laughter, and a satisfied stomach. It was heartening watching my American friends try seviyan for the first time, while assuring them that the delicacy is indeed supposed to look semi-charred.

Source*

Related Topics:

Muslims Across the World Celebrate Eid Al-Fitr*

Jeremy Corbyn Praises Muslim Heroes of Grenfell Tower fire in Eid Message*

U.S.-led Coalition Killed Nearly 500 Civilians in Syria during Ramadhan*

These 5 People don’t Spend Eid with their Families to make the Occasion Happier for Us*

Eid Mubarak- final Ramadan Reflection 2011

Muslims Across the World Celebrate Eid Al-Fitr*

Muslims Across the World Celebrate Eid Al-Fitr*

Eid al-Fitr, or the “feast of breaking of the fast” marks the end of Ramadhan, the Islamic holy month of fasting.

With Muslims making almost one-quarter of the World’s population, celebrations are taking place in all continents.

The sun rises above a mosque before the morning prayer for Eid al-Fitr in Lipljan, Kosovo, June 25, 2017.

 

Muslims perform Eid al-Fitr prayers in Al-zahara square in Juba, South Sudan June 25, 2017.

Women offer Eid prayers at Badshahi Mosque in Lahore

 

Men greet each other after the Eid prayers in Karachi

 

Indian Muslims offer prayers during Eid at the Jama Masjid mosque in New Delhi

 

Iraqis offer Eid prayers in the city of Najaf

 

Iranian women offer Eid prayers in western Tehran

 

Chinese Muslims visit Niujie mosque during Eid in Beijing

 

Chinese Muslims offer Eid prayers at the Niujie mosque in Beijing

 

 

Egyptians celebrate and try to catch balloons released after Eid al-Fitr prayers, marking the end of the Muslim holy fasting month of Ramadhan at a public park, outside El-Seddik Mosque in Cairo, Egypt June 25, 2017

 

Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad (3rd R) attends prayers on the first day of the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Fitr, inside a mosque in Hama, in this handout picture provided by SANA on June 25, 2017, Syria

 

Iraqi children enjoy riding a mini car as they celebrate Eid al-Fitr, in Mosul, Iraq June 25, 2017.

Muslims in Indonesia mark the end of the Muslim holy fasting month of Ramadhan.

 

Sri Lankan Muslims offer Eid prayers at the Galle Face esplanade in Colombo

 

Muslims in Thailand mark the end of the Muslim holy fasting month of Ramadhan.

 

Muslims in the Philippines mark the end of the Muslim holy fasting month of Ramadhan.

 

Afghan children ride on swings during the first day of the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Fitr, which marks the end of the holy month of Ramadan, in Kabul, Afghanistan June 25, 2017.

 

 

Displaced Iraqi girls who fled their homes pose as they celebrate Eid al-Fitr, in Mosul, Iraq June 25, 2017.

 

Muslims in Taiwan mark the end of the Muslim holy fasting month of Ramadhan.

 

Men pray at the martyrs’ cemetery on Eid al-Fitr in Racak, Kosovo, June 25, 2017.

 

 

Source*

Related Topics:

Jeremy Corbyn Praises Muslim Heroes of Grenfell Tower fire in Eid Message*

Guyana President joins Muslims for Ramadhan Iftar*

Syria’s More Confident Assad gives Eid Prayers in Hama*

n Praises Muslim Heroes of Grenfell Tower fire in Eid Message*

These 5 People don’t Spend Eid with their Families to make the Occasion Happier for Us*

God-consciousness After Ramadhan

 

Free to Give from the Heart*

Free to Give from the Heart*

By Caroline Garnet McGraw

How to Not Respond

Have you ever beat yourself up over not responding to every message you received in a day?

Me too. I know how it goes. On one hand, you’re tired and overwhelmed. But on the other hand, there are emails! Texts! Calls! All demanding a response!

If we check in with ourselves, we can sense which messages require our attention. However, we have trouble heeding that inner knowing because it conflicts with what we’ve been taught…

If someone writes, we must write back.

If someone starts talking, we must converse.

If someone moves in for a hug, we must embrace

You don’t have to respond to interactions that you sense are not right for you

 

I Don’t Want to be Rude

It doesn’t matter if we feel uncomfortable, exhausted, or just plain unwilling. If we don’t do these things, then we’re unkind and rude. Right?

In the Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt pilot episode, reporters interview women who spent 15 years underground in a doomsday cult’s bunker.

One woman shares the story of her involvement:

“I had waited on [the cult leader] at a York Steak House…and one night he invited me out to his car to see some baby rabbits, and I didn’t want to be rude, so … here we are.”

It’s a searing example of how the fear of being rude and impolite can put us in real danger. And sure, the character is exaggerated to the point of parody, but I recognized myself in that woman.

The fear of being rude and impolite can put you in harm’s way

 

The Loving Choice

What time have I wasted in needing to be seen a certain way? What danger have I courted with my inability to say a direct no? What have I sacrificed on the altar of being too nice?

A while back, I was struggling with whether or not to respond to some troubling emails. I didn’t feel comfortable keeping in touch with the sender, but the thought of not responding triggered feelings of guilt and insecurity.

What if I hurt this person’s feelings? Was I not being compassionate enough? Should I be polite, or listen to my intuition?

Eventually, I asked my husband Jonathan for his perspective. He said, fiercely,

“You don’t owe anyone an interaction.”

When Jonathan said those six words, they freed me to delete those emails. Sometimes, not interacting is the most loving choice.

Set strong boundaries so that you protect your time and don’t feel guilty.

 

Protect Your Time

Yes, I practice good manners, sending thank you notes, and staying connected to friends. But I also set boundaries and trust my intuition. There’s a balance.

If you don’t have practice with boundaries, though, it’s hard to protect your time. You’ll feel like a bad person when you step back or say no. When the false guilt strikes, remember that there is a difference between hurt and harm.

When you say, “I don’t owe anyone an interaction,” you’re not harming anyone. You’re just reminding yourself of what is true. It’s not your job to people please or walk on eggshells. Rather, your job is to live with love and integrity.

Losing energy – as fatigue sets in one may respond by abusing drugs. Insomnia is another symptom at this stage.

You have the authority to decide how to spend your time and energy.

Free to Give from the Heart

Will some people have hurt feelings if you decline their invitations and delete their messages? Probably. That’s tough to accept, but the alternative is worse. Trying to manage other people’s emotions while tuning out your own is exhausting. It harms your health and your relationships.

We’ve been conditioned to believe that being kind means being available 24/7. But if we don’t guard our time, our ability to be kind erodes.

So the next time you feel pressured to respond, try taking pause and reminding yourself that you don’t owe anyone an interaction. Revel in the reality that you get to choose. You have the authority to decide how to spend your time and energy.

And here’s the real beauty of it: when you don’t owe anyone an interaction…you’re free to give from the heart.

Source*

Related Topics:

Love in a Time of Lack*

We were Made for these Times*

Turning the Tide — Our Time is Now*

Practical Spirituality for Our Times*

The Gift of Sharing

The Beast of Burden on the Path of Enlightenment*

How to Break out of a Spiritual Rut by Finding your Passion*

Giving Birth to Unconditional Love

The Shift: The Age of Heart*