Tag Archive | self development

The Effects of Fluoride on Consciousness and the Will to Act*

The Effects of Fluoride on Consciousness and the Will to Act*

By Jordan Resnick

New evidence has linked fluoride and other chemicals to brain disorders. What other unknown effects might this industrial by-product added to our water supply have? An examination of water fluoridation’s shadowy history reveals potentially disturbing ramifications for human consciousness.

Recent research has brought the controversial practice of water fluoridation back into the spotlight, revealing links between water fluoridation and brain disorders, particularly in regard to its effect on children.

Troublingly, the report found that side-effects do not only come from direct ingestion by children, but also from higher levels of chemicals such as fluoride in expectant mothers’ blood and urine, which was linked to brain disorders and lower IQs in their children. In many cases, the changes triggered can be permanent. This evidence flies right in the face of spurious claims by skeptics that ingestion of fluoride in low concentrations has no harmful effects on our health.

Is it any wonder then that only seven countries in the world actually fluoridate more than 50 percent of their water supply? Although it is often portrayed in America as if every country does it, this is very far from the truth. In fact, the United States accounts for more than 50 percent of all the fluoridated water drinkers in the world, while the vast majority of European countries for example avoid this practice altogether.

So what is fluoride and why do a few countries continue to infuse their public drinking water with this controversial chemical? What ramifications might its side effects have for human development?

How Water Fluoridation Came to Be

Although there is widespread acceptance that fluoride is toxic in high doses, a trend emerged in the twentieth century to add this chemical to drinking water at dosages deemed to be “safe.” Where did this trend originate?

It may surprise you to hear that apparently the first occurrence of purposefully putting sodium fluoride into drinking water took place in the German ghettos of the 30s and 40s, and shortly thereafter in Nazi concentration camps. Clearly, the Nazis would not be concerned with the strength and resilience of their prisoners’ teeth; so, what could be the real reason to fluoridate the water? What effects does it really have upon us? And why are countries such as the United States still doing it?

Let’s now look at how water fluoridation started in America. An industry researcher from the Mellon Institute financed by the Alcoa Company first recommended water fluoridation in America in 1939. Seeing as Alcoa had toxic waste, a bi-product from aluminum otherwise known as fluoride and stood to benefit from finding a way to sell and dispose of it, could this really be a coincidence? The report convinced dentists and the public at large that water fluoridation is good for our teeth. With this, whether intended or not, the industry gained a way to get toxic waste off their hands, and moreover, even be paid to get rid of it—by selling it off to be dumped into the public water supply.

In 1946, an attorney and former counsel to Alcoa was appointed to head the U.S. Public Health Service. Shortly thereafter, he ensured that the water fluoridation “experiment” passed essentially unchallenged and unchecked by any real public study or research and was soon given a $750K private bonus from Alcoa. In today’s dollars, that’s worth anywhere from $6.89 million to $55.3 million, depending on how you account for inflation.

But some people have identified a more sinister agenda behind water fluoridation that goes beyond apparent greed and convenience. At the end of World War II, Charles Elliot Perkins, a researcher in chemistry, biochemistry, physiology, and pathology, was sent to Germany to take charge of their chemical plants. He later wrote in response to what he had seen and heard while there:

The real purpose behind water fluoridation is to reduce the resistance of the masses to domination and control and loss of liberty … Repeated doses of infinitesimal amounts of fluorine will in time gradually reduce the individual’s power to resist domination by slowly poisoning and narco-tizing this area of the brain tissue, and make him submissive to the will of those who wish to govern him.”

How Fluoride Suppresses Consciousness

Pineal gland parenchyma with calcifications. Attribution: Wiki User Difu Wu

 

But how does a chemical bi-product dumped into the water supply actually work upon those who ingest it over time? There are many ways sodium fluoride consumption affects our bodies, but one aspect we’ll focus on in this article is that sodium fluoride calcifies the pineal gland. British scientist Jennifer Luke published a study which found that fluoride deposits tended to accumulate in the pineal gland and calcify it. In addition, a 450 page review on fluoride toxicity published by the National Research Council in 2006 reported that fluoride produced a range of negative side effects including “decreased melatonin production” and “other effects on normal pineal function, which in turn could contribute to a variety of effects in humans.”

Not just scientists, but mystics too have explored the effects of the pineal gland within us (from different angles): physically, it plays an important role in regulating sleep patterns and sexual development; spiritually, it is said to be a connection between the body and the soul, and is referred to by some as our “third eye.” Either way, when the pineal gland is calcified by sodium fluoride, it obviously cannot function properly. This could have grave effects both physically and spiritually upon humanity.

There is more to the human body than its physical apparatus. This is widely evident in phenomenon such as near-death experiences, whereby people have had accounts of experiencing existence while their brain and body has been clinically dead. However, while we are here physically, the spiritual components depend upon the physical apparatus in order to function properly and thereby communicate and actively participate in the physical world. When an important seat of consciousness such as the pineal gland cannot function properly, by logical extension, consciousness itself cannot function properly within us, since the physical means with which it functions in the world has been damaged.

Thus, it is not only that fluoride consumption has adverse health effects and reputedly makes people easier to control (as the Nazi’s believed), but the very spiritual essence of who we are, our consciousness, can be hindered from manifesting in our lives. Within our consciousness are all the spiritual feelings such as love, peace, happiness, and freedom, as well as mystical experiences and psychic faculties. The consciousness gives us the ability to be “here,” “awake,” and present psychologically.

There are sinister agents in the world and beyond who wish to see consciousness suppressed. There appears to be an evil behind water fluoridation that runs deeper than mere convenience, and the implications go beyond fluoride’s reputed effects of making a people compliant who would otherwise question questionable things (such as water fluoridation – the irony notwithstanding). On the deepest level, it’s about a person’s individual ability to awaken consciousness and experience their full potential.

Concluding Remarks

Over ten years ago already, in November 2003, the United States passed the Water Act, which made it impossible for water companies to undergo civil or criminal hearings as a result of adding fluoride to public water supplies. It becomes more and more difficult to affect change on a mass scale to practices such as water fluoridation when those who have political, military, and legal control enact these types of measures. Fortunately, it is still within people’s ability to take measures to avoid fluoride and speak out however, and to personally do what they can to preserve, exercise, and awaken their own consciousness.

Source*

Related Topics:

Bottled Water Containing Fluoride*

U.S. EPA Scientist Fired for Telling the Truth about Climate Engineering + Fluoridated Water*

Doctors List 50 Reasons Why You Must Stop Drinking Fluoridated Water Now*

U.K. to Put Fluoride in Milk for School Children*

Social Engineering and an Inconvenient Tooth

Scientists Find Fluoride Causes Hypothyroidism Leading To Depression, Weight Gain, and Worse…*

How to Resist From a Place of Love: Self-Care for the Long Haul*

How to Resist From a Place of Love: Self-Care for the Long Haul*

By Colin Beavan

There is a heated conversation in some activist circles that goes like this: Should our work draw strength from fear and anger or from a place of love and compassion? I have heard people say that if we stop being angry and start being loving, we would be letting the culprits off the hook. We would be blinding ourselves to the bad things happening and—in indulging our nice feelings—forget to help those endangered.

In workshops I give to help activists and concerned citizens cope, there’s an experiment I use that addresses this. It goes like this:

Conjure up all the fear and anger you have about the world and the politicians from the other side and the scandals and the targeting of those least able to defend themselves. Probably you’ll get a physical sensation. Where is that sensation? For most people it is in the throat and top of the chest. Now, imagine that you are powering your voice from there and that you are shouting at a march or speaking to an elected official. Try speaking from there right now, out loud. How long could you sustain it? Do you get the sense that before long you would go hoarse?

Next, imagine the love you feel for nature and the compassion you feel for those who need help. Now ask yourself where in your body the physical sensation is. For many, the feeling is located just below the naval. Now try to power your voice from that place, speaking out loud again. How long could that energy last?

If you are anything like me, you might get the feeling you could go forever.

And that is the thing about fear and anger versus love. Regardless whether the other side “deserves” anger, we must sustain ourselves for the work ahead. Can we actually go on forever with a blaming mentality, or will our work be better served by love? Our vision for the world is more likely to be achieved if it is grounded in compassion and love.

Recently, because so many people in my community were anxious and exhausted after the election, I held a workshop called “The Long Haul: Wisdom for Activists and Concerned Citizens.” The goal was to search for an attitude that would help us continue to work steadfastly toward a fair, compassionate, just, safe world without burning out.

There were nearly 40 of us. Some were seasoned activists alarmed by the bottom dropping out of all they thought they had achieved. Others were formerly disengaged citizens woken up by the election. Others were just concerned citizens, tired of being isolated behind their computer screens with all that worried them.

Here are three exercises we did.

Witnessing each other’s good work and giving thanks

We walked around the room introducing ourselves to each other, briefly recounting actions we had taken, like visiting elected officials or going on marches. Each of us attempted to really listen, then offered heartfelt thanks and hugged or touched each other’s shoulders or squeezed each other’s hands. This exercise helps change our view of the world from a dangerous, hate-filled place to a loving, hope-filled place. Keeping our focus on the good in the world helps many of us sustain our work.

Owning our complicity in the world’s problems

In groups of four, we each owned aspects of our own personal responsibility for the problems in the world. We talked about how we used fossil fuels even as we condemned the fossil fuel industry. We talked about how we had never bothered to take note of the 3 million to 4 million deportations that happened each year prior to Trump.

Bringing the world’s problems home and owning our part in them allows us to dissolve the imaginary monsters we see in Trump voters and people whose ideas differ from ours. Owning our complicity allows us to see ourselves in and have compassion for those we blame. We get to see that all of us—all of us—get caught up in deluded thinking and actions.

Create a positive vision rather than react to negative events

Next, we took turns in pairs telling each other our visions for the world. We each talked not about what we wanted to resist but about what we wanted to create. We talked about the clean air and water that comes with renewable energy. We talked about the resilient communities that come with racial and economic justice. We talked about the capable children that come with good schools. This provided us with a sense of agency and defined the good things we wanted for the world.

After the workshop, I was heartened to see how the energy in the room had lightened. People seemed inspired to carry on.

“I realize I have been clinging to my anger and my need to make someone else wrong with more energy than I have been trying to figure out how I can do what’s right,” someone said.

The point of this kind of work is simply not to let ourselves sink so deeply into our own despair that we can no longer act to combat the suffering of others. Caring people need to take care. We may have to find ways to put aside our unsustainable anger and fear in favor of our endless reserves of love and compassion.

Source*

Related Topics:

Why do we Hate?

Radical Kindness: Inspiration from a Fearless Rebel*

The False Alien Threat to Be Used to Keep Populations in Fear*

U.S. Students form Protective Wall around Praying Muslim Classmates*

Singing Your own Song – A Source of True Joy and Belonging*

Charlie Chaplin’s Final Speech in the Great Dictator*

As I Began to Love Myself…*

The Delusion ‘I Am Not Responsible’*

This Man Riddled their Mosque With Bullets, now They’re Forgiving Him*

Are You Awake? Or Just Informed*

It’s OK, I Didn’t Know How To Meditate Either*

 

The Astonishing Vision and Focus of Namibia’s Nomads*

The Astonishing Vision and Focus of Namibia’s Nomads*

The Himba people of Namibia can see fine details and ignore distraction much better than most other human beings – a finding that may reflect the many ways that modern life is changing our minds and abilities.

By David Robson

Nestled in a grassy valley of north-eastern Namibia, Opuwo may seem like a crumbling relic of colonial history. With a population of just 12,000, the town is so small that it would take less than a minute to drive from the road sign on one side of town to the shanty villages on other. Along the way, you would see a hotchpotch collection of administrative offices, a couple of schools, a hospital and a handful of supermarkets and petrol stations.

For many of the people living in the surrounding valley, however, this small town is also the first taste of modern life. The capital of the Kunene region, Opuwo lies in the heartland of the Himba people, a semi-nomadic people who spend their days herding cattle. Long after many of the world’s other indigenous populations had begun to migrate to cities, the Himba had mostly avoided contact with modern culture, quietly continuing their traditional life. But that is slowly changing, with younger generations feeling the draw of Opuwo, where they will encounter cars, brick buildings, and writing for the first time.

How does the human mind cope with all those novelties and new sensations? By studying people like the Himba, at the start of their journey into modernity, scientists are now hoping to understand the ways that modern life may have altered all of our minds. The results so far are fascinating, documenting a striking change in our visual focus and attention. The Himba people, it seems, don’t see the world like the rest of us.

The first hints that modernisation could change our vision came from the Victorian anthropologist WHR Rivers, who explored the islands of the Torres Strait, between Australia and Papua New Guinea at the turn of the 20th Century. As he met the locals, he offered them various sensory tests, including the following phenomenon, known as the Muller-Lyer illusion. Take a look at the two lines below left, and try it for yourself:

Which arrow appears to be longer – top of bottom? Your answer may depend on the ‘carpentered’ corners in your house (Credit: Wikimedia Commons)

 

In reality, the lines are exactly the same, but if you ask people to estimate their size, most Westerners claim that the second line (with the ‘feathers’ pointing outwards) is around 20% longer than the top line. During his expedition to the Torres Strait, however, Rivers found that the locals were far more accurate – they just didn’t seem to be as susceptible to the illusion. The anthropologist later repeated the experiment on the Toda people of southern India, finding exactly the same effect, and the same result has since been found in many other pre-modern societies, including the San people of the Kalahari Desert.

It’s a profound finding, showing that even the most basic aspects of our perception – which you may assume to be hardwired in the brain – are shaped by our culture and surroundings. One theory is that the illusion results from the fact that modern humans spend more time indoors, with lots of “carpentered corners”. If the angles along the edge of an object are out, an object is usually further away from us, like the distant wall of a room, whereas if the angles point inwards, it is usually closer to us, like the near side of a table (see above). The brain has learnt to process this perspective rapidly, helping us to estimate size at distance, but in the case of the illusion, that brain processing backfires. Like an irregular lens, our modern, urban brains distort the images hitting our retina, magnifying some parts of the scene and shrinking others.

When Jules Davidoff visited a Himba ‘kraal’, he found no traces of western influence in their way of life (Credit: Alamy)

 

Such studies, comparing different cultures, had been few and far between, however. As I have previously explored in another article for BBC Future’s The Human Planet series, most psychological studies have tended to use Weird (Western, Educated, Industrialised, Rich, Democratic) participants, using experiments on American undergraduate students to represent the whole of humanity. But Jules Davidoff at Goldsmith’s University in London, U.K., has bucked this trend, and his studies of the Himba offer some striking evidence that many more factors, beyond our “carpentered corners”, may be influencing our perception.

In many ways, the Himba are the absolute counterpoint to our modern, urban lifestyles. The herders live in small groups of wooden huts surrounding a sacred fire – thought to be the spiritual link to their ancestors – and a day’s work revolves around the rearing of cattle, sheep and goats, which they keep in an enclosure known as the “kraal”. The villages are semi-nomadic, and will move with the seasons to find new pastures for the livestock. To many Westerners, the Himba are most famous for their striking appearance, thanks to the rich red ochre that they spread over their skin and hair.

Davidoff’s team were scrupulously sensitive to the Himba’s way of life. They had to gain the permission of the village chief for each experiment, and typically performed the experiments outside the kraal; he says he was only once invited inside.

“The hut was really like this Stone Age thing – it was truly remarkable,” he says.

“There were no Western artefacts in their society,” he says.

Despite these basic circumstances, they are general healthy and well-fed.

“They really don’t seem to want for very much – it’s a nice life in many ways.”

Initially, Davidoff had been concerned about the ways these people would react to the laptops and electronic equipment that were crucial to some parts of his research; one colleague told him that the Himba would even be unfamiliar with pen or paper, let alone a computer. But he needn’t have worried; they seemed to adapt to the technology with no qualms at all. And so, with the chief’s permission and with the help of a translator, he has gently probed the ways they see the world.

Many of his first experiments centred on the Ebbinghaus Illusion:

Which circle appears bigger? Again, your reaction to this optical illusion will depend on your cultural background (Credit: Wikimedia Commons)

 

Westerners tend to see the central circle in the first picture as being smaller than the central circle in the second – when they are actually the same size. And just as Rivers had seen with the Muller Lyer illusion, Davidoff’s team found that the traditional Himba were far less susceptible than those of us living in modern societies.

The phenomenon seemed to reflect a basic bias towards “local processing” – they were more focused on the smaller details (the central circles) while ignoring the context (the surrounding ring) that warps your perception. To test this phenomenon further, he asked them to compare abstract figures made up of smaller figures – such as a square made of crosses, or a cross made of squares. (You can see examples here.) When judging the similarity of these pictures, the Himba were more likely to base their judgements on the smaller elements, rather than the overall shape – again suggesting a ‘local’ bias on fine details.

More strikingly still, later experiments showed this enhanced focus also seemed to be reflected in their ability to hold their attention and ignore distraction: when they were asked to quickly search for shapes in a grid, for instance, they were less easily distracted by the movements of other objects on the screen. In fact, they appeared to be the most focused of any groups previously studied.

Davidoff emphasises that the traditional Himba are flexible: they can easily see the “big picture” when encouraged to do so. Even so, their strong preference for focusing on the local details is puzzling.

One explanation for their astonishing focus may come from the cattle rearing itself. Identifying each cow’s markings was apparently essential for their daily life – and this practice may perhaps train the eye with a focus and attention that was lacking in all modern societies.

“I think that does come from their traditional lives – the powers to concentrate,” says Davidoff.

Himba people living their traditional life appear to have remarkable visual concentration, an ability to stay focused on the smallest details (Credit: Alamy)

 

But it could also be that modern life itself makes us more easily distracted by our surroundings. And it is for this reason that Opuwo is so interesting, as younger generations slowly migrate to the shanty villages on the edge of the small town. As the anthropologist David P Crandall put it in his book The Place of Stunted Ironwood Trees: “The fascination and attraction of city lights, even the dimmed and often fractured ones of Opuwo, proffer an allure and mystique, a cosmopolitan novelty to be found nowhere else in their world.” It is, he says, “the vanguard of change for the entire region… a crossroads of several worlds.”

To discover how this move might influence the Himba’s psychology, Davidoff’s team compared Himba migrants to the small town, with those still living the traditional lifestyle. As they had expected, the Himba who had spent years living on Opuwo were less focused on the local details (making them more susceptible to the Ebbinghaus illusion, for instance) than those living in the countryside. But you didn’t need to have spent your whole life in the town for it to have an effect; the team found that even very short day trips to Opuwo seemed to have had a lasting impact their perception, making them less focused on differences in the local details (and more conscious of the overall shape) when comparing two abstract figures, for instance. Needless to say, the influence was much greater for those who lived in the town – but it was still present even for the Himba who had only visited a couple of times. “There does seem to be a ‘dose effect’ – the more of it you have, the greater the effect becomes,” says Davidoff.

As Davidoff points out, urban environments are naturally more cluttered than the Kunene valley, with more objects vying for our attention. Just think about crossing the road, as your eyes dart from the traffic lights to the oncoming cars and the fellow pedestrians making their way towards you. Our attention needs to be more diffuse.

Then there’s the stress of urban life, compared to the relative tranquillity of life in the kraal. As Crandall described in The Place of Stunted Ironwood Trees:

“Though a stranger might at first hear only silence, the beat of a distant drum, the bicker of chatting voices, the grinding stones, the bleating and lowing of livestock, the rushing of wind, the chirping of birds, the clicking of insects, the stamping of feet, and the clapping of hands form a constant and familiar stream of sounds.”

The hustle and bustle of a town, in contrast, may put you on high-alert, and this stress primes your visual system to cast its net wider, as it is on the lookout for threat.

A Himba woman goes grocery shopping in Opuwo. Exposure to this busy visual environment may permanently change her perception (Credit: Alamy)

 

These are just hypotheses, however – and it is interesting to put it in the context of other research exploring non-Western cultures. The psychologist Richard Nisbett at the University of Michigan, for instance, has strong evidence that our vision can be influenced by our social lives: people who live in more interdependent, collectivist societies like Japan and China tend to focus more on the context of a social situation – and they also tend to pay more attention to the backgrounds of pictures; they are more ‘holistic’ and less ‘analytical’.

“If you are paying attention to the social world, you incidentally pay attention to the physical world too, so you end up noticing things that wouldn’t be noticed by someone with an analytical mindset,” says Nisbett.

(For more information, see our in-depth article: How East and West think in profoundly different ways.)

The Himba appear to live in a tight-knit community, rich in traditions that bind the whole group – so they would seem to be an exception to this rule. But Nisbett has also shown that people’s professions make a difference, even within the same culture: shepherds in Turkey tended to be less holistic than farmers or fishermen, for instance, perhaps because it brings a greater focus on the individual and less cooperation between group members. A closer examination of the Himba’s working and social lives, compared to other indigenous peoples, will help pick apart the various factors that shape their view of the world.

Davidoff also points out that we should beware reports exaggerating the perceptual differences in indigenous populations. He has seen some articles arguing that pre-modern people are puzzled by photographs, for instance – failing to comprehend the flat, 2D images of the world around them. In fact, the Himba were quite the opposite: they would often ask him to bring back photos on their return trips.

“They recognised other people in the group very quickly,” he says.

“I’m certain there was no concern about photographic reality.”

The love of a good selfie, it seems, can cross all cultural boundaries.

Source*

Related Topics:

Lost Posture: Why Some Indigenous Cultures Do not have Back Pain*

And their eyes glazed over -Technology and Attention Deficit*

Earth Magneticism and the Human Body

Linguistic Colours of Life*

Five Signs When a Man is Connected to his Heart*

Five Signs When a Man is Connected to his Heart*

Gamo People and Sacred Forests of Ethiopia

By Bryan Reeves

What Does it Take to Be a Real Man?

Many men think our power is in our brains or our balls.

Our rational brains are supposed to do all the figuring out, while our testosterone-filled balls supply the driving force.

Intelligence. Determination. Courage. Sheer force of will. These are the masculine convictions of our brains and our balls. And they’re absolutely valid and essential in their own way. But when used in isolation from our true power source for too long, they leave us dead inside, unable to deeply connect with life – including our intimate partners.

When I was a U.S. military officer, I was trained to use those masculine brains’n’balls convictions to accomplish whatever the mission; whatever the cost. After 10 years of operating purely on brains and balls alone, I was completely dead inside. I couldn’t really laugh. I couldn’t at all cry. I had an amazing girlfriend I couldn’t really love. I couldn’t feel much of anything.

I didn’t realize then that the military takes to the extreme what modern culture idolizes: the prioritization of rationality over emotion; the worship of intellectual understanding over embodied knowing. The military intentionally disconnects the brains and balls from embodied knowing because that’s our direct connection to the actual, tangible, visceral life we’re immersed in every moment, regardless of what our brains have to say about it.

The military knows that you can’t take life when you feel connected to life.

The military knows that you can’t take life when you feel connected to life

The military knows that you can’t take life when you feel connected to life

 

Men, particularly, routinely deny this powerful, embodied connection to life that we cannot experience through our thinking brains alone. Yet this power centre is what enables us to deeply feel our own lives, to feel the world, and to then create truly extraordinary relationships with other people and lives in which we thrive every day.

Truly, when we live from this innate power source which connects us to life itself, we can make entire worlds thrive. This power source isn’t in our brains or our balls. It’s in the heart.

We men tend to think of ‘heart’ as merely something to help us win the game or appeal to a woman’s romantic side. That’s like thinking the sun is only good for heating bath water.

A man genuinely connected to his heart, who lives each day with his brain and balls in proper service to his heart’s deeper wisdom, is a man that breathes life into the world. He can inspire and lift up the world, even if it’s only one person’s world.

How does a man connected to his heart show up every day, not just when his team is down 5 points, with only a minute remaining? What does such a man look like?

1) He’s Deeply Patient

With himself. With others. With life.

When we’re connected to our hearts, we’re able to be patient with, and authentically love, life, ourselves and other people, even when they don’t do what we want them to do – which is almost always.

Woman Wearing "Tudung," or Headscarf

When we are connected with our hearts and life, we can easily cultivate patience

 

In the military, I was so disconnected from my heart that I hated life. I was imprisoned in my brain. Sex was my only escape. The day I left base for the last time, I headed for the open road with only a backpack and pent-up rage. Little did I know, I was also heading into the darkest night my soul has ever experienced.

That dark night waxed and waned for 12 years and involved angry women and drugs and heartbreak and financial ruin. I was always impatient for the rest of the world to change so I could finally feel good, and I acted out in countless ways to make it change. By its end, my ego had been gutted so profoundly, as I finally had to accept just how little I am in control of anything, or anyone, and just how messy life is; no matter what I do to keep it clean. With every smash against the rocks I took, every despairing night and furious girlfriend, the heavy armour surrounding my heart cracked and weakened, until I gradually discovered an abiding peace and laughter I had never felt in my body before.

“The wound is the place where the light enters you. ~ Rumi

When I finally emerged from that dark night, I found myself in a new reality that showed me we are all innocent in our ignorance. We are each doing the best we can, all the time, even when it doesn’t look that way. If we truly knew how to do things better, we would.

That one insight gave me access to an embodied patience with people, myself, with life, that I had never known; that no one ever taught me.

That insight was borne of a freshly opened heart.

“The wound is the place where the light enters you. ~ Rumi

“The wound is the place where the light enters you. ~ Rumi

“The wound is the place where the light enters you. ~ Rumi

Granted, my patience remains a work in progress, for my brain and my balls still constantly seek to assert their authority.

But my heart is no longer a slave to my brain or my balls. I can move powerfully towards my true heart’s desire – whether that be a woman or a trip to the tropics – with patience enough to allow life its surprise curve balls. Curve balls are half the fun, anyway.

That’s another way you can recognize a man of heart; he makes most things fun…

2) He Laughs Easily and Authentically

I didn’t really know laughter until I was well into my 30s. Oh, I laughed plenty before then. But I took myself, and life, so seriously that my laughter was shallow and intellectual. But I didn’t know that until the wisdom in my heart started showing me the wild beauty in all things.

Rainer Maria Rilke wrote:

“If your daily life seems poor, do not blame it; blame yourself that you are not poet enough to call forth its riches; for the Creator, there is no poverty.

My intellect has always been predisposed to lie to me, by telling me things are worse than they really are. My brain usually says I’ve got to work harder, be better, and do more just to survive; never mind thrive. It says the same about you. And my balls, well, they’re never satisfied for long.

It’s hard to fully let go and surrender to laughter when I believe I’m not yet good enough…or that you aren’t…or that life isn’t.

My heart, on the other hand, is perfectly content to enjoy this moment. It can find the innocence in most any situation, and it can laugh effortlessly at the crazy divine comedy that is life. The heart doesn’t laugh in shallow arrogance through a facade of “I’m better and smarter than you”.

True laughter comes from the heart

True laughter comes from the heart

 

A man connected to his heart knows we’re all made of the same stuff underneath the surface gloss. The laughter that erupts from that place is profound; divine. It’s like the sound of love tickling itself.

3) He’s Kind to the World

A man connected to his heart is kind to everyone. That doesn’t mean he likes everyone. It doesn’t mean he tolerates everyone. He might even put someone in jail if they prove to threaten the world he envisions. But he can always see the innocence that leads to ignorant, even awful, behavior.

A man connected to his heart can hold compassion for the worst, even as he locks the cell door.

I saw this in my relationships with women who acted in destructive ways, because they did not know how to effectively communicate their pain to me. Stuck in my head, I judged and fought them for their immature behavior, while ignoring the pain at their core.

With an open heart, I’m more able to stay kind with an intimate partner who’s acting out her pain.

And yes, like most things, it’s work in progress.

4) He’s Fully Present

I hear this all the time from women, that their men don’t seem to be present with them.

What does that even mean?

Being fully present is a full-body sport: it requires participation of the head, the heart, AND the balls. When a man lives in his head or his balls alone, his partner won’t feel his presence. One way it reveals itself is through the quality of his listening.

We can feel when a person is fully present with us

When I was trapped in the brain-ball matrix, I would only listen to a girlfriend with the singular intent of evaluating to respond. I wanted to keep our thoughts in agreement because that’s the only place I figured peace of mind – and sex – could happen. My attempt to intellectualize every argument, however, mostly created chaos.

When a man connected to his heart listens, he listens with his entire body (which includes his brain and his balls). He doesn’t just listen for a way into the outcome he wants. He listens with his whole body, for the deeper message beneath the words. He listens at the level of the heart, where the real truth often resides.

His partner can feel this – his presence – when he breathes deeply and listens with his whole body.

5) He’s Passionately Living His True Purpose

The work I did in the military felt completely out of alignment with my true purpose. I was miserable. The day I left, I instinctively knew to run fast and run far. Not from the military, but from living inauthentically.

The pain of that situation – where I had money, prestige, comfort, respect, and misery – left me with no choice but to seek my true purpose in life, wherever that journey would take me.

That’s why I went through such darkness.

A man on his path is a man of heart

A man on his path is a man of heart

 

To find my path, I had to break the stranglehold my brain and balls had on my heart. They didn’t surrender graciously.

A man connected to his heart lives the truth inside that heart, whatever it looks like. If he’s doing work he doesn’t love, he’s doing it for bigger reasons driven by his authentic heart; perhaps to take care of his family or serve his community.

In my case, after years of running from the imaginary security of a paycheck, in search of authentic work aligned with my heart’s desire, I finally found it in writing and coaching. I’m really good at both, and I make a meaningful difference in people’s lives every day.

But I would never have come this far if not for the immense power in my heart.

Source*

Related Topics:

Why Male Immune Cells are from Mars and Female Cells are from Venus*

U.K. Children as young as 4 being asked their Gender Option other than Male or Female*

The Disappearing Male*

Pistorius: The Hegemonic White Male*

Boys in Search of Manhood

A Tradition of Manhood

True Love is a ‘Verb’*

War Is a Racket*

Love Misplaced By Capitalism*

Islam and Martial Arts: China’s Hui Muslim Tradition*

Islam and Martial Arts: China’s Hui Muslim Tradition*

By Eissa Da

Western media has always been saturated with images of Bruce Lee, Jackie Chan and Jet Li, but what we don’t hear about as often is the relation between Islam and martial arts. The early trade that led to a great relationship between Arab Muslims and the Chinese acted as a pivotal role in the spread of Islam in the Far East as well as cementing the Muslim-Chinese identity. Dating back to the 1200s, the roles early Chinese Muslims played in military leadership positions forms the beginning of this most unique connection.

Islam in China is well documented with the Hui people acting as the largest Muslim minority within the country. From approximately 19 years after the death of Prophet Muhammad ﷺ a relationship between China and Arabia was already in place. It was the third Khalifah (Caliph) ‘Uthman who initiated the first conscious efforts to spread Islam in the region, with subsequent trade missions also contributing to the spread of Islam.

The Hui Muslims came from this lineage, a unification of Arabia and China to form this unique position of authentic Chinese culture, infused with the Islamic tradition, the likes of which can still be seen to this day in various parts of the country, though mostly concentrated in the northwestern parts of China. The practice of martial arts still takes place in various Masajid (mosques) around the country, with Islamic sciences being taught at the same time.

Not only did martial arts combine with practical aspects of defence for long seafaring trade missions, but it also was a spiritual tool of many Muslim masters. The need for self-control and restraint reflect in both martial arts and traditional Islamic teachings.

The concept of Islamic self-control was used by martial art masters in the physical realm as well. With practitioners putting emphasis on both spiritual and physical aspects of training. The need for calm and collected decision making is a tradition upheld by Muslims, as seen in the tradition of The Prophet ﷺ , “The strong is not the one who overcomes the people by his strength, but the strong is the one who controls himself while in anger.” The essence of Ijtihad (diligence) in maintaining self-discipline is integral in both paths.

Various art forms such as Silat and Wushu have been perfected by Muslims of the last few hundred years, with many original martial arts being either created or adapted by Muslims as well, such as Zhaquan and Piguquan. These original developments were tools that were created often by army officials or to safeguard Muslims in China, being passed down in secret through generations.

In the history of this marriage between martial arts and Islam, there are many names to consider. We can see examples of masters such as Wang Zi Ping (1881 – 1973) and Chang Tung Sheng (1908 – 1986) who trained in their discipline while retaining their faith and using it as a means to come closer to Allah and the teachings of their religion.

Master Wang Zi Ping, acknowledged as a master of Wushu was also a learned man in relation to the Religion. He was known to lift heavy stones while reciting the Qur’an. A notable story tells of his opposition to German forces who attempted to obtain the doors of Qinzhou masjid that was inscribed with the history of the Muslims in China. Master Wang was not one to let a priceless part of Muslim identity be taken away, and so challenged the soldiers to a weight lifting competition and subsequently won.

Also, a master of various other disciplines, Wang Zi Ping was an inspiration to people, Muslim and non-Muslim alike. His mastery of a variety of martial arts allowed him to gain victory over various foreign opponents, leading to a great following of students, thus also spreading the reach of Islam amongst Chinese people.

In reality, martial arts and the Islamic tradition share a unique bond and history that within them both contain means to achieve a greater purpose. Acting as reflections of each other, the history of Islam in China led to the expansion of the Religion to the far eastern corners of the world, and the practical nature of martial arts helped defend this tradition in a way that kept the uniqueness of Chinese culture, with the absoluteness of the religion of Islam.

Amjid Ali is Wing Chun instructor and also a practicing Muslim. In the video below he relates his journey of learning, from travelling to Hong Kong and training with legendary martial artist Ip Man and close friends of the late Bruce Lee. He provides an interesting insight into the similarities between Islamic and martial art teachings.

Source*

Related Topics:

Developing the Muslim Self Through Martial Arts

Mexican Martial Art Based on Traditional Mayan Culture*

Modern Day Colonnialism: The Uyghurs versus China*

A Field View of Reality to Explain Human Interconnectedness*

A Field View of Reality to Explain Human Interconnectedness*

“It is remarkable how closely the history of the apple tree is connected with that of man.” –Henry David Thoreau

Is it true the physical world we see with our eyes is the essence or nature of reality? For much of human history, this is what scientists and most people around the world have believed. More recently, however, another view of reality has emerged, one the authors of HeartMath’s new e-book, the Science of Interconnectivity, † contrast with the historic view.

“Classical physics conceived of reality as elementary building blocks made up of solid objects, separated by empty space,” the authors explain.

“This view continues to be most people’s view of reality, including scientists.”

In contrast, they write,

“Physical objects cannot be understood, or observed in isolation, but rather must be viewed as part of a holistic web of interconnectedness in which fields and relationships are pivotal.”

This new view, which HeartMath Institute’s Dr. Rollin McCraty and Annette Deyhle, Ph.D. refer to in their e-book as the “field view of reality,” is shared by a growing number of scientists around the world who are engaged in actively researching it.

The understanding of the world we live in profoundly shifted,” McCraty stated for this article,

“after the discovery of electromagnetic fields and the experimental validation of modern quantum physics.” These have helped to give rise to the field view of reality.

“We can no longer think of reality as little building blocks separated by an empty space,” he said.

“We now know there is no such thing as empty space and that physical objects, including us, do not exist in isolation, but are part of this holistic web of interconnectedness in which fields and relationships are primary.”

HeartMath and the Field View of Reality

The field view ties in closely with research at HeartMath Institute (HMI). The institute has conducted experiments for a number of years to demonstrate the ways in which people are connected with one another through their own individual magnetic fields, which are generated primarily by the brain and, although much more so, the heart.

Examples of these experiments include measurements of an infant’s heart rhythm registering in the brain waves of its mother, and the heart-rhythm coherence of a boy corresponding to an increase in his dog’s heart-rhythm coherence.

In the latter example, a boy and dog were placed in a room together. Then the boy moved to a separate room, which resulted in the dog experiencing chaotic and incoherent heart rhythms, in contrast to when it and the boy were in the same room. The boy was instructed to use a coherence technique to consciously feel feelings of love and care for his dog, which he did after re-entering the room with the dog, while having no physical contact with it. The dog’s heart-rhythm coherence increased significantly.

Through its Global Coherence Initiative, HeartMath also has had success in demonstrating some of the health and behavioral effects of activity in Earth’s magnetic fields.

Other scientists have studied solar and geomagnetic activity and correlated it to changes in blood pressure, blood composition and the physical and chemical state of humans. There are many documented cases in which researchers have attributed increased rates of depression, heart attacks and debilitating conditions to solar and Earth magnetic field activity. (You can learn more about the Global Coherence Initiative and its work at GCI Research.)

solar-system-periodicField View of Reality and a Theory of Everything

Besides being the title of the popular 2014 film about physicist Stephen Hawking, a “theory of everything” also arguably is the Holy Grail of modern physics. Simply explained, physicists hope such a theory, which is more formally referred to as a grand unified theory, would fully explain and link together all physical aspects of the universe.

Now, such an ambitious endeavour, which many physicists project may actually be successful within decades, naturally is far more complicated than the brief description above. The notion of a link, or connection between everything, however, suffices to convey one of its primary purposes, which happens to be a shared purpose with HeartMath’s own research.

Connectedness, or what HMI calls interconnectedness, is an important and primary area of interest today at HeartMath and its Global Coherence Initiative (GCI). This interest has led their scientists in several directions as they explore and seek to validate the central hypotheses they have formulated in their interconnectedness studies.

  1. Human and animal health, cognitive functions, emotions and behaviour are affected by planetary magnetic and energetic fields.
  2. The earth’s magnetic fields are carriers of biologically relevant information that connects all living systems.
  3. Each individual affects the global information field.
  4. Large numbers of people creating heart-centered states of care, love and compassion will generate a more coherent field environment that can benefit others and help offset the current planet-wide discord and incoherence.

As today’s physicists pursue a unified theory that would explain and link together all physical aspects of our universe, HeartMath will continue expanding on its work in the realm of a field view of reality and the interconnectedness of all living things.

“New perspectives are emerging that suggest nonmaterial fields organize and in-form all organisms, including key aspects of our thoughts, emotions and intuitions,” McCraty said. “It is exciting to see new data coming out of our research that shows that we really are deeply connected with each other and with fields of the earth.”

The Science of Interconnectivity e-book is expected to be released around mid-July and will be available for purchase in HeartMath Institute’s online bookstore. Contributors to the current Tree Research Project, which is part of HMI’s ongoing interconnectedness research, can receive a free copy of the e-book.

Source*

Related Topics:

Woman Dies and Comes Back To Life with This Incredible Message for Humanity*

A Star Child Speaks, Calls for Humanity to Wake Up*

‘Shoot at Us First’: Veterans Form Literal ‘Human Shield’ to Protect Standing Rock Protesters from Cops*

Humanity at the Crossroads: The Crisis in Spiritual Consciousness

The Psychic Roots of Tyranny*

Consciousness Science Kept Hidden*

What Unconditional Love Can Do to a Severely Disabled Child*

Freedom Proves Gravity Subject to Another Force ~ LOVE*

Love’s In Need Of Love Today

We Are All One (Tawhid)

Physics of Tawhid: A Quantum View of the World

Human DNA Tied Mostly to Single Exodus from Africa Long Ago*

White Supremacist Finds Out He Is Part Black*

I Am NOT Black, You are NOT White

Yoga, Race and ‘Colour Blindness’*

In the Beginning was/is Consciousness*

When a Prayer is Answered with a Test*

When a Prayer is Answered with a Test*

By Anisa Abeytia

Studies say that no matter where you were born, after living an average of five years in another country, you are susceptible to the same diseases as the native population. I lived in the Middle East for five years and in the Muslim American community for fourteen. I was not raised a Muslim and I’m not an Arab, but after nineteen years, I picked up some interesting habits.

Last summer, my children’s school received extra funding for tutors over the summer break. The kids weren’t thrilled, but I was. The perspective tutor called and we chatted about the children’s needs. She told me her brother’s names is Yousuf, just like my son. She had an accent, but I couldn’t place it and I didn’t want to ask her where she was from. It’s wasn’t important. I figured she was from a Muslim country and I’d find out when she came to my house.

The children waited for her and we watched as she parked and walked down the street to our house. She was a thin woman, wearing a scarf on her head, tied behind her head like a Russian peasant. I tried to place her look and I thought, maybe she’s Bosnian.

We sat and chatted for a few minutes and she again told me joyfully that her brother’s name is Yousuf. So I asked her where she was from.

“I was born in Israel,” she replied.

My heart sank. I looked at her scarf, the way she wore it and then back at her face. She must be an Orthodox Jew. I could feel my face rearrange itself into a frown and the colour drained from my face. I was embarrassed by the thought that she might notice the physical change, but her demeanour didn’t change at all. I tried to force a smile, but figured it would contort my face into an even more bizarre expression, so I just gave up.

My son entered the room before I was able to recover and she hugged him. My eyes opened wide, and I half expected her to harm him. Images of bleeding Palestinian children and angry Israeli settlers filled my head. My eyes darted back and forth, looking for an escape and to see if my mother had any of the Palestinian flags out.

I wondered, would she hurt him? I didn’t want to leave them alone, but I slowly turned to walk up the stairs. Why was I thinking this way? As I took each step, I tried to talk sense to myself.

I don’t even know her and I’m judging her. Step.

Don’t jump to conclusions. Step.

Women in Black are Israeli. Step. 

This continued until I reached the top of the stairs, at which point I spent two hours debating with myself. Am I supporting the occupation? Am I doing a bad thing? Should I go downstairs and ask her to leave? How do I justify that? I have to dig deeper than that for an answer to how I should behave. I look out the window and take in a deep breath, close my eyes, exhaling slowly.

What does Islam say?

I open my eyes. The answer is easy, don’t judge. Don’t be suspicious and always treat people in the best possible way. She is a guest in my house and my child’s teacher. Am I a Muslim? Do I follow my religion only when it’s convenient?

I’m calm now and just in time, the tutoring session is over.

I make my way down the stairs and my mother walks into the room. The tutor says she loves all the art on the walls and asks who the collector is. My mother starts to tell her about a Syrian Artist, Akram Abu Al Foz that I told her about.

“Anisa, show her his work. It’s absolutely stunning.”

I take out my phone and start to explain. She loves it, so I tell her about my trips to Turkey and my work with the Syrians. She asks me many questions and I answer. A few days later I receive a phone call from her. She tells me she was so inspired by the work I’m doing and would like to help. Would I mind meeting with her daughter who works at a local radio station?

I’m a bit taken aback. She wants to help me? I can barely get Arabs, Muslims or Syrians to help me and she is this Jewish-Israeli woman asking me if she can help? Then she tells me,

“My parents are Syrian. We are Syrian Jews.”

I am so happy I start laughing and I tell her how frustrated I’ve been, that I had decided to stop the work I was doing because I just wasn’t getting support and that I prayed a week ago and said,

“Oh Allah, if this is the path you want me to continue on, you will need to send the help to my door because I will not make one more effort.”

I was so depressed and ready to give up and my prayer was answered with a test. If I had given into the common Arab/Muslim mentality that all Jews are bad, I would have lost this opportunity. She opened doors for me that I didn’t even know existed. However, the greatest gift she gave me was a renewed sense of hope and the knowledge that I was not alone. I only need to ask, with an open heart and mind, and help would be sent.

Source*

Related Topics:

Yoga, Race and ‘Colour Blindness’*

Rabbis Thank Ahmedinejad for his Stance Against Zionism

An Unorthodox Rabbi Who Allied Himself With Prophet Muhammad*

A Small Act of kindness Disarms anti-Muslim Protester.*

Black History Month and Muslims

#Arabs4BlackPower Releases Movement for Black Lives Solidarity Statement*

Why were the Black Lives Matter protesters at London City Airport all White?*

Christians Join Forces with Muslim Group Hezbollah to Fight ISIS in Lebanon*

U.S. Military Veterans Asked Lakota Elders for Forgiveness*

Despite Increasing Threats and Violence, Americans Show Support for Muslim Neighbours*

Heavenly Signs: Pluto Discloses

From the Symbolic Ascension to the Ascension of Our Lives

Lost to the Sea of Life

A Tool to Refocus Your Emotions

Is Your Heart as Strong as it is Big?

Faith vs. Ego!

Even Babies Know What is Fair!

The High Price of Suppressing Compassion

Body Atlas of Human Emotions*