Tag Archive | spirituality

Shab-i-Barat: The Night of Forgiveness*

Shab-i-Barat: The Night of  Forgiveness*

Faithful on Thursday night observe “Shab-i-Barat” with great religious reverence and fervour across the country.

With the setting of the sun, the faithful started gathering in mosques to offer special prayers for peace, progress, and prosperity of the country besides seeking forgiveness for their sins.

An illuminated view of Badshahi Mosque decorated with colorful lights on the eve of Shab-i-Barat.

 

Women release oil lamps and candles in the water of Ravi river, seeking forgiveness and repentance.

 

The people also organised several gatherings and Mahafil-i-Naat to achieve Allah Almighty’s blessing in the world and the life hereafter.

Religious scholars in their sermons highlighted the teachings of Islam and various aspects of the life of the Holy Prophet (PBUH) so that the followers could lead their lives in line with the Qur’an and Sunnah.

Family members light lamps and pray at a grave of their relative. —AP

 

A woman reads the holy verses besides a grave of her relative at a graveyard in Karachi. —AP

 

Special prayers were offered to get rid of the menace of terrorism besides showing the right path to disgruntled people, playing in the hands of anti-state elements.

On this occasion, houses, streets and especially mosques were decorated with colorful pennants and bunting whereas at night these were well illuminated by means of electric lights, candles or even oil lamps.

People read holy verses near the graves of their relatives to mark the night of forgiveness. —AFP

 

Besides, people visited graves of their near and dear ones, seeking Allah’s blessings for the departed souls.

Special security arrangements were made for peaceful observance of “Shab-i-Barat”.

People attend a sermon at a mosque in Karachi.

 

Source*

Related Topics:

Layla-tul Bara’at

Prophet Muhammed (SAW) on Ramadhan

Ten Ways to Prepare for Ramadhan From Now*

Ramadhan Journey Across the Desert of the Sinai*

Freedom in Ramadhan*

Working and Staying Sane in Ramadhan*

I’tekaf – The Gem of Worship that you May not Know About*

I’tekaf – The Gem of Worship that you May not Know About*

“…And We imposed a duty upon Abraham and Ismael, (saying): Purify My house for those who perform Tawaf (Ta’ifeen) and those who are staying [there] (A’kifeen) for worship and those who bow and prostrate [in prayer].” (The Holy Qur’an 2:125)

Once again the blessed month of Rajab has arrived, and the anticipation for the feast of Allah has started. You may be already thinking:

 “how can I make the best of the next two months to help prepare for a Ramadhan that’s not just all about hunger and thirst?”

If that is the case, then it is your lucky day, because you may have just stumbled upon the perfect method to get you ready for Ramadhan; and that’s through I’tekaf.

Those of us who have lived or visited Muslim countries before are more likely to have heard of the ritual of I’tekaf, but if it doesn’t ring a bell, you’re in for a surprise! It is a fascinating practice which can only be likened to the ihram of Hajj, where you give up on many of your worldly desires and start a journey of self-purification and spiritual revival.

In essence, I’tekaf refers to the act of residing in a mosque for a period of three days or more, during which an individual seeks closeness to Allah (swt) by performing various A’mal (rituals) and refraining from a number of prohibited acts. It may sound simple, but there is a beauty to I’tekaf that makes it so special compared to other rituals in Islam.

Yes, we have all recited our beloved Qur’an before; we have all stood shoulder to shoulder next to our brothers and sister in congregational prayers, but each of these A’mal when performed in I’tekaf gain a whole new dimension. Imagine you are on a three-day journey to Allah where each individual A’mal count as a station along a journey that is set to enrich us for the rest of it. That Quran recitation on the back of that beautiful lecture, followed by an inspiring dua and later on by Salatul Layl, all performed amongst other mo’takifeen who have devoted themselves to Allah (swt) for three days… that’s what makes I’tekaf so special. You are no longer in this world, but in a place where none of your daily worries matter.

What is I’tekaf?

I’tekaf literally means ‘to stop in a certain place‘, and in the Islamic context it refers to staying in a mosque for a period of three days or more. An individual can do I’tekaf at any time of the year, but the best period is between 13th to 15th of Rajab and during the last ten days of the holy month of Ramadhan. The I’tekaf in Rajab is more common as it is a great way to prepare ourselves for the holy month of Ramadhan.

The beauty and importance of I’tekaf can be seen in the holy Qur’an, where Allah (swt) mentions in Surah Baqara:

“…And We imposed a duty upon Abraham and Ismael, (saying): Purify My house for those who perform Tawaf (Ta’ifeen) and those who are staying [there] (A’kifeen) for worship and those who bow and prostrate [in prayer].” (2:125)

The word A’kifeen is a reference to those who perform I’tekaf in the house of Allah. This ayah shows that I’tekaf is not an act only introduced by Islam, but one that was practiced by followers of other prophets including prophet Ibrahim (as).

It is narrated from Imam Ali (as):
فلم يزل يعتکف في العشر الاو اخر من رمضان حتي توفاه الله
“The Prophet (sa) was always in state of I’tekaf in the last ten days of Ramadhan until Allah (swt) took his life”. (Bihar al-Anwar, v. 94, p. 7)

What A’mal must to be performed during the three days?

I’tekaf officially starts at Fajr on 13th of Rajab, and ends at Maghrib on 15th. To be regarded a Mo’takef, it is obligatory for an individual residing in the mosque to fast for each of the three days. A person who is not able to fast for whatever reason, is not able to perform I’tekaf. Apart from this, there are no other obligatory A’mal, but it is highly recommended to recite plenty of Qur’an and be in constant remembrance of Allah (swt). And of course the last day of I’tekaf in Rajab coincides with the beautiful A’mal of Umm Dawood.

What acts are prohibited?

Leaving the Masjid is not permissible during the state of I’tekaf except for a necessity. Applying perfume and smelling perfume with the intention of deriving pleasure is prohibited, and this act makes I’tekaf null and void and is also a sin. Also prohibited are discussions and arguments both in relation to the world and the faith. This means that a person argues with another to prove that he is better or smarter or that he knows more, etc… However, if a person must argue or debate to uphold the truth and destroy falsehood, it is permissible – and in fact, this is the best form of worship and servitude to Allah (Glory and Greatness be to Him) during this noble state. Buying and selling anything is prohibited, as is deriving pleasure from one’s spouse in any way – holding hands, hugging, kissing, etc… all are completely forbidden in the state of I’tekaf. If any of these things are performed, one’s I’tekaf becomes void.

What do we aim to achieve?

The period of I’tekaf is the best time to force one’s self to sit and think and reflect on the self and the world around, and it is the best time to forget the worries of the transient world and to return to the soul and the Creator of the soul.

It is also the best time to return back to Allah (Glory and Greatness be to Him) in true repentance for our sins committed through the year, and to concentrate on the Words of Allah in the Qur’an, the prayers and supplications used to call upon Him, and all of those things which are related to Him and His Sacred Essence.

I’tekaf is not a three-day holiday from work or school; it is not a time to sit in the Masjid in complete ignorance of ones’ self and his spiritual surroundings; and it is not the venue to pass one’s time in idleness. I’tekaf is not the act of sleeping and snoring in the Masjid and killing time either. Truly, I’tekaf is a three day spiritual retreat to build the self; it is the act of leaving one’s personal house to be in the service of Allah (Glory and Greatness be to Him) and to recognize one’s self in Allah’s house (the Masjid) while at the same time, being a guest in the House of Allah (Glory and Greatness be to Him), eating His food which He has sent and being around His servants which He has guided.

Where can I perform I’tekaf?

I’tekaf is widely practiced in many of the mosques in Muslim countries. However, in more recent years it has become more common in Western countries. The following is a list of known cities that will host I’tekaf programmes this year between 11th and 13th April. Participants arrive at the mosque on 10th April in the evening, in time to be present for Fajr of 11th. All these events require registration and have limited spaces:

London / UK – Imam Ali Mosque (contact: itekaflondon@gmail.com)
Hamburg / Germany – Imam Ali Mosque (more info on: http://en.izhamburg.de/)
Stockholm / Sweden – Imam Ali Islamic Center (contact: info@imamalicenter.se)
Vancouver / Canada – Az-Zahraa Islamic Centre (contact: info@az-zahraa.org)

Source*

Related Topics:

Arguing God from Being?

Our Conception of God isn’t Big Enough*

Layla-tul Bara’at

Ten Ways to Prepare for Ramadhan From Now*

Are We Ready for Ramadhan?*

Prophet Muhammed (SAW) on Ramadhan

Nepal’s Military Set to Use Transcendental Meditation to Relieve Global Collective Stress and Stop War*

Nepal’s Military Set to Use Transcendental Meditation to Relieve Global Collective Stress and Stop War*

Never say never in a world that has become hard-wired to disengage from the real meaning of life…

By Col. (Ret.) Jitendra Jung Karki, Dr. David R. Leffler

Nepal’s army schools are finishing their first stage implementation of Invincible Defense Technology (IDT). The ultimate goal of IDT is to prevent enemies from arising by reducing the collective societal stress that culminates in war, terrorism, and crime. IDT involves use of the Transcendental Meditation (TM) technique and its advanced practices, ideally by the military, to reduce this collective societal stress.

Extensive peer-reviewed research has documented the efficacy of this approach. Militaries and police worldwide have successfully field-tested and are now using this approach (see Review Nepal, 10 August 2016 “IDT: A powerful, proven Tool for Police and Military“).

The army school in Bhaktapur, Nepal was the first military school to implement TM. Three hundred of its teaching staff and 2700 students there have greatly benefited from practicing TM, according to TM teacher Ms. Pappy Regmi. Ms. Regmi says: “TM has been practiced by the students of Sainik Awasiya Mahavidyalaya Sallaghari Bhaktapur for the past three years.

After the students mastered the simple, natural, and easy-to-learn TM procedure, we noticed many positive changes in them. They are less irritable, aggressive and destructive in nature than before. Many students improved their academic performance. This non-religious scientifically-validated technique is helping the students in their overall development.”

Author Col. (Retd) Jitendra Karki lectures about Invincible Defense Technology while former Nepalese Home Minister, Deepak Prakash Baskota attentively listens

 

Mr. Samim Anwar Shamim, the former Principal of the army school also noticed improvements: “Daily Transcendental Meditation practice in the school greatly reduced the abuse problems and antisocial behavior of students. It has been the best tool to maintain discipline and healthy environment in the premises of the army school.”

There are many other individual benefits to be gained for warriors who regularly practice TM. Three hundred ninety five peer reviewed studies show that TM improves physical and mental health and wellbeing. TM reduces the pathological and physiological results of chronic stress. Clinical trials and meta-analyses show reductions in: anxiety, high blood pressure, smoking, alcohol use, hardening of the arteries, insulin resistance, and a nearly 50% reduction in risk of heart attack, stroke or death.

Due to the initial success of IDT implementation, the NEPAL ARMY WELFARE DIRECTORATE has taken IDT seriously and has decided to implement it in three schools of the Nepal army. Two army schools from Chitwan and Pokhara have already started the TM program as a part of the project.

There are other important IDT benefits. Research has shown that the TM technique promotes development and resilience, improves wellness, and dramatically reduces burnout and symptoms of post-traumatic stress. For this reason, the Veterans Society of Nepal and the Nepal Maharishi Vedic Foundation jointly launched a project to teach the TM program to retired army personnel. Due to their combined efforts, retired Nepalese army officers and Nepal Army Rehabilitation Center war casualties have learned TM.

The individual benefits of IDT for the warrior are promising. Invincible Defense Technology is aptly named. The most important benefit to be gained from implementation of IDT is invincibility for the nation of Nepal. Invincible means incapable of being defeated; unconquerable. Defense means to defend and to protect. Technology is applied science. The goal of IDT is to prevent enemies from arising. The military that properly applies it can ultimately obtain victory before war. Once this goal is achieved, the military becomes invincible because there are no enemies to fight.

Former Home Minister, Deepak Prakash Baskota was one of the first Nepalese leaders to advocate military use of IDT to create invincibility. In an 2012 article published in Eurasia Review titled “How Nepal Can Have An ‘Invincible’ Military” he wrote: “Leaders in Nepal could make their mark if they adopt this most ideal defense system. The implementation of IDT would mark a turning point in the history of Nepal’s national defense, and the leaders in Nepal would also be leading the world into perpetual peace.”

Nepalese military leaders were wise to follow his advice. These are exciting times for the military of Nepal as increased numbers of TM meditators in the army schools will be learning a more advanced practice of IDT. In just a short time these warriors will have an even more powerful influence. IDT “Prevention Wings of the Military” will accelerate reduction of Nepal’s collective stress.

When their training is complete they will be able to operate directly at the level of the unified field of all the laws of nature — a level that is a thousand million, million (10 to the 15th power) times more powerful than the nuclear force. It is the level where all the fundamental forces of natures are united. For this reason, IDT supersedes all other known defense technologies (which are based on electronic, chemical, and/or nuclear forces). Therefore, the military of Nepal will gain the ultimate strategic advantage of invincibility by averting the rise of any enemy and they WILL achieve victory before war.

To read the original article, click here.

Source*

Related Topics:

Child Survivors of Nepal Earthquake Sold to Rich British Families*

These People are Going into Syria on Feb 1st to Meditate for Global Peace*

Einstein’s Letter to His Daughter about the Universal Force of Love*

On the Rights of Nature*

Meditation: Tibetan

The Brain Connection: Prayer and Meditation

“Deadly Facts”: How So-Called “Objectivity” Created a Culture of Conformity*

Love in a Time of Lack*

Meditation Does More for You Than Keep You Calm!

The Psychic Roots of Tyranny*

 

The Disappearance of Silence*

The Disappearance of Silence*

Only Allah Knows what tomorrow will bring, but today is yours in the making

By Edward Curtin

Silence is a word pregnant with multiple meanings: for many a threat; for others a nostalgic evocation of a time rendered obsolete by technology; for others a sentence to boredom; and for some, devotees of the ancient arts of contemplation, reading, and writing, a word of profound, even sacred importance.

But silence, like so much else in the present world, including human beings, is on the endangered species list. Another rare bird—let’s call it the holy spirit of true thought—is slowly disappearing from our midst. The poison of noise and busyness is polluting more than we think, but surely our ability to think.

I am sitting on a stone step of a small cabin on an estuary on Cape Cod. All is quiet. Three feet in front of me a baby rabbit nibbles on grass, and that nibbling resounds. A mourning dove moans intermittently. I see the wind ripple the marsh grass and sense its low humming. I feel at home.

I am dwelling in silent stop-time.

It strikes me how rare silence has become; how doing nothing seems so un-American. Noise and busyness have become our elements. While I watch the rushes sway, I wonder why wherever you turn people are rushed and stressed. A frantic anxiety prevails everywhere. Whether you ask the young, the middle-aged, or the retired, they all report stress and lack of time.

“It’s crazy,” you often hear them say. “It” is never defined.

Clearly there are powerful forces that profit from this noisy busyness, this connected way of technological consumption, this contraction of time. Everyone seems to have their reasons why they are in such a state, but few imagine how and why it may be “engineered.” They don’t have the quiet time to do so.

Or they don’t want to.

When I speak of noise I am not thinking primarily of the din we associate with city life—cars, trucks, taxis, horns, sirens, congestion, etc.—a world rushing to get somewhere for unknown reasons. That noise, alas, is hard to avoid, even in small towns or suburbs. If I travel a half mile from where I sit in silence, I will encounter such noise as people speed by in cars on their search for a vacation from it.

Being in a secluded spot on Cape Cod for a few days is a luxury. I realize that. So too is having these minutes to write these words. Yet I know also that I am choosing to do so, and that for me the luxury is also a necessity. How could I live without “doing nothing” in silence? Even the computer I am typing these words on tells me I am wrong: it wants to correct my words “doing nothing” to “doing anything.” I’m surprised it doesn’t tell me that I should be having “fun,” though perhaps doing anything is the equivalent.

The noise of modern life is hard to avoid completely, and, in any case, it is the least disruptive of the silence I have in mind. There is another kind of noise that is self-imposed and whose purpose, consciously or not, is to make sure one is not “caught” by silence. As those who flee from silence know, it can be dangerous to one’s reigning assumptions about self and the world. Noise seems more comforting.

We all know people who go from morning ‘til night, day in and day out, without ever pausing to enter the sounds of slow silence. One doesn’t have to look far for them; technology has made them the rule. They race through their lives in the cocoon of technological noise. They’re informed, in touch, tuned in to everything but their own souls. They drown themselves in the incessant noise of televisions and radios, or the busyness of telephone calls, texting, or trivia “that has to be done.” They are always planning, going, organizing, and scheduling activities. Or talking—endless chatter about the weather or shopping or the latest mainstream media’s blaring headlines.

They choose to fill their lives with distracting noise in order to avoid the silence that might force them to confront issues of self-knowledge that are the stuff of great books, true art, a fully human life; self-knowledge that connects the individual to his social circumstances in his historical period; knowledge that might allow them to grasp the sources of the profound anxiety and despair that induces their franticness. This is what C. Wright Mills called the sociological imagination.

For fifteen years the United States has been living under an official state of national emergency and constant, paralyzing fear—a fear that keeps people moving as fast as they can so they don’t stop and look back and see what has happened to them and why and where they are heading—over the cliff.

A forests reflectionIt is another day now and I am sitting in the shade of a tree looking out on a beautiful harbour filled with sailboats. A seagull swoops and sails before me. A strong wind picks up from the west. This water is the playground of the wealthy. Unlike the poor, they can buy outer silence. They seem to have plenty of time to think deep thoughts, such as where did all their money come from. From corporations that are part of the military-industrial complex? By exploiting others? I suspect they use their “free” time to think of other things.

For some reason the rough water reminds me of all those refugees fleeing war and chaos on the Mediterranean Sea. Desperate people. Why must they die seeking refuge? Why must they flee their homelands? Who drove them to the boats? The sea and silence brings these thoughts to my mind? Silent reverie can do that. It can conjure up disturbing thoughts.

I often write about such matters. Most of what I write is serious stuff, what people refer to as “heavy” writing: wars, assassinations, coups, etc.—a lot of history, social issues, philosophical and theological questioning. And I find that many people find it tough to take. They can’t find the time or silent concentration to read it closely and study to see if my analyses are correct. I think they choose not to take the time to enter the cocoon of silent concentration it demands. They will nod or demur, but not delve any deeper. Deeper means danger.

Those hundreds of thousands of fleeing boat people, for example; who is responsible for their fate? Who started the wars that drove them from their homes? Might we be implicated? Do we bear responsibility? Can we be silently attentive enough to hear their cries and explore the facts? Is the noisy busyness a self-imposed distraction from the truth? Do we live in bad faith?

Can we stop talking, stop moving, and stop doing long enough to contemplate such matters?

Can we shut up long enough to listen to what the silence might reveal?

What are we running away from? Are there truths so deep and so disturbing that they must be “silenced”?

I think so.

Slow silence would allow us to understand how the leaders of the United States are pushing the world toward the ultimate silence of nuclear conflagration by provoking war with Russia. Most people are too “busy” and too distracted—and therefore too ignorant—to notice. So for them it’s not happening. It’s not happening, as Harold Pinter said of all the countless war crimes committed by the United States while the American people were hypnotized into thinking otherwise: “It never happened. Nothing ever happened. Even while it was happening it wasn’t happening. It didn’t matter. It was of no interest.”

We were too busy to notice. All we could hear was noise, propagandistic bedlam.

A society suffering from socially induced attention-deficit disorder is a society in a state of disintegration. Focused on the noisy foreground of conventional thinking fueled by a mass media spewing out endless distractions and pseudo-events, most people are lost in a cacophonous mental chaos.

I’m not sure if there is any point in writing these words.

But I am sure that the art of writing implies the art of reading. The writer creates and the reader recreates; both demand silence, a not-doing, the cessation of all noise that serves to prevent true thought. Can you hear me?

The machines must be turned off. “Our inventions,” Thoreau noted, “are wont to be pretty toys, which distract our attention from serious things.”

It is not hard to turn a switch, pull a plug, or press a button; the hard part is wanting to. Harder still, but equally necessary, is the quieting of the mind, the silencing of the incessant internal chatterboxes that accompany us everywhere.

Unless by some miracle we reject the bill of goods of noisy busyness that has been sold to us to sow confusion, we are doomed. That might sound hyperbolic, but it is not. We are being led to the slaughter by crazed elites who are pushing for a world war. We are drowning in lies and more lies, lies compounded by noisy repetition.

“There ain’t nothing more powerful than the odor of mendacity. . . . You can smell it. It smells like death.” That’s what I recently heard Big Daddy say in a production of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.

The Trappist monk Thomas Merton once wrote that someday they will sell us the rain; in saying that he implied that any essential, beautiful aspect of life could be destroyed by a society hell-bent on destruction through war and consumerism. Now that they have sold us noise and speed to eliminate slow silence, we are in far deeper trouble. We can’t think straight, if we can think at all. And clear thinking has never been more important.

Gandhi, the revolutionary, put it perfectly,

“In the attitude of silence the soul finds the path in a clearer light, and what is elusive and deceptive resolves itself into crystal clearness. Our life is a long and arduous quest after Truth.”

Source*

Related Topics:

The Freedom of Silence*

Reflections on the Idea of a Common Humanity*

An Elementary School Has Kids Meditate Instead of Punishing Them and the Results are Profound*

Healing your Creativity after Trauma*

The Space In-between: A Journey through Solitude to Spiritual Growth*

 

The Oldest Qur’an Discovered in England of all Places*

The Oldest Qur’an Discovered in England of all Places*

What a turn up in the midst of Cameron’s regurgitated Blair’s ‘blood for oil speech’ and labelling all British Muslims as terrorists from the cradle to the grave….

Which of His signs would you deny?

By Sara Aridi

Though the Muslim holiday of Eid-al-Fitr just came to an end, many Muslims may find that they have yet another reason to rejoice.

In what has been considered a “startling” discovery, the UK’s Birmingham University unveiled what may be the world’s oldest remnants of the Qur’an, Islam’s holy text.

Researchers conclude that the Qur’an manuscript is among the earliest written textual evidence of the Islamic holy book known to survive,” the university wrote in an official statement.

“This gives the Qur’an manuscript in Birmingham global significance to Muslim heritage and the study of Islam.”

Oxford University carried out a radiocarbon analysis of the text and found that the parchment on which it is written could be traced back to the years between AD 568 and 645 with 95% accuracy.

Radiocarbon analysis dated the manuscripts close to the time of the Prophet Muhammad [Birmingham University]

The results suggest the manuscript was written less than 20 years after Prophet Muhammad’s death, as he is generally thought to have lived between AD 570 and 632.

“They could well take us back to within a few years of the actual founding of Islam,” wrote Professor of Islam and Christianity David Thomas and Professor of Interreligious Relations Nadir Dinshaw, both of Birmingham University.

According to Muslim tradition, Prophet Muhammad had a vision in 610. Speaking through the angel Gabriel, God ordained him to become the Arab prophet. Up until his death in 632, the Prophet and others continued to collect religious revelations that would form the Qur’an.

Most of the revelations were originally preserved in the “memories of men,” the professors wrote, until Caliph Abu Bakr, Islam’s first leader after Muhammad, ordered the collection of all Qur’anic material in book form.

The final written form was completed around AD 650 under the rule of the third leader, Caliph Uthman.

The manuscripts are written with ink in Hijazi – an early form of Arabic [Birmingham University]

“Muslims believe that the Qur’an they read today is the same text that was standardized under Uthman and regard it as the exact record of the revelations that were delivered to Muhammad,” the professors wrote.

The newly discovered text suggests that belief is highly plausible.

“These portions must have been in a form that is very close to the form of the Qu’ran read today, supporting the view that the text has undergone little or no alteration and that it can be dated to a point very close to the time it was believed to be revealed,” they added.

Preserved on two parchment leaves, the text contains parts of Suras (chapters) 18 to 20 written with ink in an early form of Arabic script known as Hijazi. For nearly a century, the manuscript had been misplaced with leaves of a similar Qur’anic manuscript, which is also datable to the late seventh century.

The manuscript is “one of the most surprising secrets of the University’s collections,” wrote Professors Thomas and Dinshaw.

The Quranic manuscript is part of the University’s Mingana Collection of Middle Eastern manuscripts in the Cadbury Research Library. The library received the texts in 1920 from Alphonse Mingana, a Chaldean priest who was born in Iraq and settled in England after philanthropist Edward Cadbury funded his trips to the Middle East to acquire historical texts.

‘This is indeed an exciting discovery,” wrote Dr. Muhammad Isa Waley, Lead Curator for Persian and Turkish Manuscripts at the British Library.

“Along with the sheer beauty of the content and the surprisingly clear Hijazi script, [this] is news to rejoice Muslim hearts,” Dr. Waley added.

Source*

Related Topics:

The True Furqan Hoax

How the British Empire aka New World Order Sowed Seeds of Destruction towards Islam*

Boy with Cerebral Palsy Memorized Entire Qur’an*

Hafiz Aged Three Memorized the Whole Qur’an*

Madonna Studying the Qur’an!

The Oldest Bible to Date Confirms the Qur’an

Similarities between the Brain and the Universe*

Similarities between the Brain and the Universe*

One should be careful in saying what this means, without understanding the essence of it, and that requires stepping outside science…

We often speak of the universe being a reflection of ourselves, and point to how the eye, veins, and brain cells mirror visual phenomenon in the natural universe. As above so below right? Well check this out. How about the idea that the universe is a giant brain? The idea of the universe as a ‘giant brain’ has been proposed by scientists and science fiction writers for decades, but now physicists say there may be some evidence that it’s actually true (in a sense).

The Study

According to a study published in Nature’s Scientific Reports, the universe may be growing in the same way as a giant brain – with the electrical firing between brain cells ‘mirrored’ by the shape of expanding galaxies. The results of a computer simulation suggest that “natural growth dynamics” – the way that systems evolve – are the same for different kinds of networks – whether it’s the internet, the human brain or the universe as a whole.

When the team compared the universe’s history with growth of social networks and brain circuits, they found all the networks expanded in similar ways: They balanced links between similar nodes with ones that already had many connections. For instance, a cat lover surfing the Internet may visit mega-sites such as Google or Yahoo, but will also browse cat fancier websites or YouTube kitten videos. In the same way, neighbouring brain cells like to connect, but neurons also link to such “Google brain cells” that are hooked up to loads of other brain cells.

“The new study suggests a single fundamental law of nature may govern these networks”, said physicist Kevin Bassler of the University of Houston. “

”For a physicist it’s an immediate signal that there is some missing understanding of how nature works,” says Dmitri Krioukov from the University of California San Diego.

“Here we show that the causal network representing the large-scale structure of space-time in our accelerating universe is a power-law graph with strong clustering, similar to many complex networks such as the Internet, social, or biological networks. We prove that this structural similarity is a consequence of the asymptotic equivalence between the large-scale growth dynamics of complex networks and causal networks.”

Source*

Related Topics:

CERN: Connection between Particles and Influenced Human Consciousness*

Sun’s Magnetic Field 230% Stronger and Affecting the Entire Solar System*

While ‘They’ve’ Been Dumbing us Down Earth’s Vibration has been Increasing*

Paris Climate Change Conference shows Road to NWO Weather Control*

Finding Esoteric Meaning in Everyday Life

Top Scientists Tell Russia Foetus is Human. Ban Abortion.*

Consciousness Science Kept Hidden*

Freedom in Ramadhan*

Freedom in Ramadhan*

By Aqeela Naqvi

The door to a spiritual journey is always open...For millions of Muslims around the world, it is now the most wonderful time of the year. The Month of Ramadhan is the ninth month in the Islamic lunar calendar and marks the occasion when the Holy Qur’an was first revealed to Prophet Muhammad, peace be upon him and his family. Not only is it the holiest month of the Islamic year, it is also one of the most anticipated. You might be thinking,

“Wait…isn’t this the month where Muslims fast for 30 days? Why would anyone look forward to that?”

Contrary to what might be expected, most Muslims await this month with excitement, each with their own uniquely beautiful way of spending it. My own memories involve waking in the dark hours of the morning to the warm glow of a kitchen; gathering around the table to eat Suhoor, the meal before dawn; praying Fajr, the Morning Prayer, then crawling back into the arms of an inviting bed; waking to the stomach’s faint grumbling, a hunger which is suppressed throughout the day as one focuses on building patience and awareness; the echoing call to Maghrib prayer at dusk signalling the completion of the fast; the sitting down to enjoy a beautifully prepared meal, Iftaar.

The fast of the Month of Ramadhan is not just the fast of the body—it is the fast of every sense. The tongue, eyes, ears, and hands, must all fast from doing anything that would cause harm to the self or others. Not only would eating or drinking break the fast, but so would lying, becoming angry, emotionally or physically hurting someone, etc. Through the repeated practice of refraining from certain habits, it is believed that those who fast will eventually be able to free themselves from the grip of the material realm, while transcending into the spiritual realm in order to attain Taqwa, or God-consciousness.

The question arises: if this month contains so many restrictions, why do those who fast find it so liberating?

Throughout the year, we get so caught up in the humdrum of daily life that unknowingly, brick by solid brick, we build around ourselves a prison that cages us and our potentials. We limit our vision to the glimpses of sky we can see between the bars; we make ourselves prisoners to our egos and grudges, notions of pride and self-importance. Instead of making our desires the mounts upon which we ride, we make ourselves the mounts, and hand our passions the reins. Our bodies curl inward, bowing down to the illusions of life. We forget that the world was made for us, not the other way around, and by giving it this superiority, we allow it to tell us, “Jump,” while asking, “How high?”

And then the Month of Ramadhan comes around and tells us—be the master of your desires, not the slave. Through fasting, we do not engage in “doing,” but rather, constantly engage in “undoing.” We untie knots of anger, envy, impatience; untangle ropes of lust, jealousy, ingratitude; unchain ourselves from every fetter that chains by prioritizing the body over the spirit. When our eyes seek to see that which would harm our intellectual development, when our hands seek to do that which would harm our fellow humans or ourselves, when our tongues seek to speak or our ears seek to hear the hidden faults of a brother or sister—we refrain and reflect.

We reflect and understand the sacredness of the intellect and mind of the individual, and the sanctity of the body and character of every human being (no matter their race, nationality, or creed), and understand why they must be protected at all costs.

The Month of Ramadhan reminds us that we are not bodies carrying souls; we are souls inhabiting bodies. It brings us back to our core—a reminder that, if we are able to shake off our earth-bound chains, each of us is capable of reaching unfathomable heights. The idea that there is something greater to live for than ourselves is something that resonates with both the conscious Muslim and non-Muslim alike. Through its physical restrictions on food and drink, the fast urges us that we were not made for a meek existence which is dependent on the limitations of the body. But more importantly, through its spiritual restrictions, it opens our eyes to the elevation that awaits when we are able to break free from the desires which we see as nourishing us, but which are, in actuality, slow and painful poisons.

Through the physical suffering of hunger, we are also reminded to look at the suffering of our soul. When all the distractions are removed, we see it shivering in the corner, being suffocated by the walls we have built around it, thinking we were fortifying it and making it strong, when we were actually caging it in and crushing it.

Day-by-day, our bodily hunger motions us to remember the hunger of our spirit, and helps us to realize that the truest satisfaction does not come when, every evening, we sit down to break our fasts with delicious food (no matter how amazing those kebabs taste); rather, it comes when the spirit breaks free of earthly limitations and is able to taste the essence of the Divine.

Through the hunger of the body, we go on strike against the prison of the mind. Like lights in a too-long darkened house, we switch on our consciousnesses, becoming increasingly aware of our physical, social, moral, and intellectual responsibilities—a silent, yet utterly important revolution.

The Month of Ramadhan asks us many things, but perhaps the most important question it raises is this:

“Do I have what it takes to be free?

Do I have what it takes to walk out of the seeming security of my cell, to blink my unaccustomed eyes against the brightness of the sun?

Can I dismantle the walls while asking myself—why lean against the unforgiving strength of bricks for support, when I can unfurl my wings and rest against the gentle strength of the wind?”

Thai Women Pray at Pattani MosqueThis month forces us to discard the physical for that which transcends it, and ask ourselves: “Knowing that the key is in my hands, do I have the strength to unlock my chains and journey to a swaying field that rests under an open sky; though my muscles strain from being unused for so long, do I have the motivation to run, to walk, to crawl, to keep moving towards that golden place of spiritual exaltation?

“When I walk out the door of that prison, will I ever turn back? Once I smell freely moving, constantly changing air, can I ever return to the taste of stagnation? After this month ends, will I come to hate my shackles, exchanging them for the weightlessness of the sky—or have I become so used to their weight, that I will miss their heaviness on my arms, the security of being chained to the earth?”

The Month of Ramadhan arrives every year like an old friend for millions around the world. Its days are spent in fasting and its nights are spent in prayer, and though it seems like it comes with many restrictions, those who truly understand its purpose know that its provisions do not constrict, but liberate. It is a closing of the doors of the meagre dining halls of this world, and an opening of the ones to the banquet of the Divine. It says: be hungry and feel the fullness of spirit. Refrain, and become nourished. Transcend the body, its desires. Starve the ego, feed the soul.

It takes us by the hand and smiles while saying: Every time you hear your stomach grumble and feel yourself to be weak, remember the strength to persist that lives in the hollows of your bones, remember the potential to change the world that pulses through the crevices of your palms. Every time you feel your senses begin to be pulled towards darkness, remember the glorious light that dances through your veins, remember the lion’s roar that blazes through your soul.

Remember:

Have the courage to shake off your fetters. You were not born to be enslaved. You were born to be free.

Source*

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