Tag Archive | U.N.

West Blocks Probe as It Would Show Idlib ‘Attack’, U.S. Strike ‘False Flag’*

West Blocks Probe as It Would Show Idlib ‘Attack’, U.S. Strike ‘False Flag’*

Western countries are blocking attempts to investigate the Idlib chemical incident because in the event of a probe it will be established that the “attack” was a false flag and lie, Syrian President Bashar Assad told Sputnik.

The United States and other Western countries block any attempts to launch an impartial investigation into the alleged use of chemical weapons in Syria, Syrian President Bashar Assad told Sputnik.

“We formally sent a letter to the United Nations, we asked them in that letter to send a delegation in order to investigate what happened in Khan Shaykhun,” Assad said in an interview.

“Of course till this moment they didn’t send, because the West and the United States blocked any delegation from coming, because if they come, they will find that all their narratives about what happened in Khan Shaykhun and then the attack on Sha’irat airport was a false flag, was a lie,” Assad stressed.

There was no chemical weapons attack in the Syrian province of Idlib, the reports of it were a false flag play which was supposed to justify a U.S. missile strike on a Syrian armed forces’ airbase, Bashar Assad told Sputnik.

“So, for us, there was no gas attack and no gas depot, it was a false flag play just to justify the attack on the Shairat base. That’s what happened,” Assad said.

Assad added that the Syrian army did carry out an attack in the province of Idlib on April 4, when the suspected chemical weapons incident in Khan Shaykhun took place, but at a different time than reported by western media.

“First of all, we don’t know if the site that we attacked that day half an hour before noon, about 11:30, was a chemical warehouse or depot or anything like this. And their story said that the attack happened at 6, 6:30 in the morning. We didn’t launch any attack at that time. So, you have two possibilities: the first one is that there was an attack at lunch time or at about 11:30. The other possibility that we believe in is that it was a false flag, there was no attack,” the president explained.

The videos and pictures from the site resemble those created by the White Helmets in “the last year or two years or more … which is an elusive story,” Assad said.

“That’s what we believe in, because the attack was already prepared, and they didn’t want to listen, they didn’t want to investigate; they only wanted to launch the attack. We believe it was a false flag for one reason and a simple reason: if there was gas leakage or attack, and you’re talking about 60 dead in that city, how could the city continue its life normally? They didn’t evacuate the city. No-one left the city, life continued as normal, and this is mass destruction. The other day, they attacked Sha’irat where they said there was the gas depots, and they attacked all the depots, and there was no gas coming out of that airport. No-one of our army officers or military staff, was affected by any gas,” he said.

A video footage from the Syrian Khan-Shaykhun presented by the “White Helmets” completely contradicts the specifics of sarin gas use, Syrian President Bashar Assad said in an interview with Sputnik.

Assad stressed that the video clearly shows people without any means of chemical warfare protection helping those who allegedly fell victims to sarin gas attack.

“…Even if you look at the pictures, you can see that the rescuers — presumable rescuers — were rescuing people without masks, without gloves, and they were moving freely. How? This is against all the specifications of the sarin gas that they talked about,” Assad said.

“You can fake this image, it’s very easy. So, you cannot just base your judgment on images and videos, especially made by al-Qaeda [terrorist group outlawed in Russia],” the Syrian leader stressed.

On April 4, a chemical weapons incident in Syria’s Idlib province claimed the lives of some 80 people and inflicted harm on an additional 200 civilians. The Syrian National Coalition of Revolutionary and Opposition Forces, as well as a number of Western states, accused the Syrian government troops of carrying out the attack, while Damascus refuted these allegations, with a Syrian army source telling Sputnik that the army did not possess chemical weapons.

The Russian Defense Ministry said on April 5 that the airstrike near Khan Shaykhun by the Syrian air force hit a terrorist warehouse that stored chemical weapons slated for delivery to Iraq, and called on the U.N. Security Council to launch a proper investigation into the incident.

Russian President Vladimir Putin said April 6 that groundless accusations in the chemical weapons incident in Syria’s Idlib were unacceptable before the investigation into the matter had been carried out.

However, the incident was used as pretext for a U.S. missile strike against the Ash Sha’irat airbase carried out late on April 6. U.S. President Donald Trump characterized the strike as a response to the alleged use of chemical weapons by the Syrian government troops while Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said it was a violation of the international law. Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei described the U.S. missile strike against the Syrian airfield as a strategic mistake.

In an exclusive interview with Fox Business on April 12, U.S. President Donald Trump blamed the current situation in Syria on Moscow’s support for country’s Assad, calling the Syrian leader “an animal.”

Earlier this year, Syrian President Bashar Assad said that the country’s government had never used weapons of mass destruction, including chemical weapons, against the Syrian people. Besides, under a Russian-U.S. deal after the east Ghouta sarin gas incident in 2013, Damascus joined the Convention on the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons and agreed to destroy its stockpile under Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) oversight. In January 2016, the OPCW announced that all chemical weapons in Syria had been destroyed.

Source*

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Over 100 U.N. Peacekeepers ran a Child Sex Ring in Haiti, and were ever Jailed*

Over 100 U.N. Peacekeepers ran a Child Sex Ring in Haiti, and were ever Jailed*

“Imagine if the U.N. was going to the United States and raping children and bringing cholera,” said one lawyer in Haiti, where U.N. peacekeepers face hundreds of allegations of child sex crimes.

An Associated Press investigation has documented more than 200 allegations of sexual abuse, exploitation and other prohibited conduct by United Nations peacekeepers in Haiti. (The Associated Press )

By Paisley Dodds

In the ruins of a tropical hideaway where jetsetters once sipped rum under the Caribbean sun, the abandoned children tried to make a life for themselves. They begged and scavenged for food, but they never could scrape together enough to beat back the hunger, until the U.N. peacekeepers moved in a few blocks away.

The men who came from a faraway place and spoke a strange language offered the Haitian children cookies and other snacks. Sometimes they gave them a few dollars. But the price was high: The Sri Lankan peacekeepers wanted sex from girls and boys as young as 12.

“I did not even have breasts,” said a girl, known as V01 — Victim No. 1.

She told U.N. investigators that over the next three years, from ages 12 to 15, she had sex with nearly 50 peacekeepers, including a “Commandant” who gave her 75 cents. Sometimes she slept in U.N. trucks on the base next to the decaying resort, whose once-glamorous buildings were being overtaken by jungle.

Justice for victims like V01 is rare. An Associated Press investigation of U.N. missions during the past 12 years found nearly 2,000 allegations of sexual abuse and exploitation by peacekeepers and other personnel around the world — signalling the crisis is much larger than previously known. More than 300 of the allegations involved children, the AP found, but only a fraction of the alleged perpetrators served jail time.

Legally, the U.N. is in a bind. It has no jurisdiction over peacekeepers, leaving punishment to the countries that contribute the troops.

The AP interviewed alleged victims, current and former U.N. officials and investigators and sought answers from 23 countries on the number of peacekeepers who faced such allegations and, what if anything, was done to investigate. With rare exceptions, few nations responded to repeated requests, while the names of those found guilty are kept confidential, making accountability impossible to determine.

Martine Gestime 32, wipes her tears during an interview in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Gestime said she was raped by a Brazilian peacekeeper in 2008 and became pregnant with her son, Ashford. (Dieu Nalio Chery / The Associated Press)

 

Without agreement for widespread reform and accountability from the U.N.’s member states, solutions remain elusive.

Here in Haiti, at least 134 Sri Lankan peacekeepers exploited nine children in a sex ring from 2004 to 2007, according to an internal U.N. report obtained by the AP. In the wake of the report, 114 peacekeepers were sent home. None was ever imprisoned.

In March, U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres announced new measures to tackle sexual abuse and exploitation by U.N. peacekeepers and other personnel. But the proclamation had a depressingly familiar ring: More than a decade ago, the United Nations commissioned a report that promised to do much the same thing, yet most of the reforms never materialized.

For a full two years after those promises were made, the children in Haiti were passed around from soldier to soldier. And in the years since, peacekeepers have been accused of sexual abuse the world over.

In response to the AP’s investigation, the U.N.’s head of field support said Wednesday the international body was aware of shortcomings in the system.

“We believe we are advancing in the right direction, especially with the secretary-general’s new approach,” said Atul Khare who heads the U.N. department in charge of peacekeeper discipline and conduct. “Improving the assistance provided to victims, who are at the heart of our response, is fundamental.”

Khare also said the organization was working with member states to hold perpetrators to account.

In one particularly grim case in Haiti, a teenage boy said he was gang-raped in 2011 by Uruguayan peacekeepers who filmed the alleged assault on a cellphone. Dozens of Haitian women also say they were raped, and dozens more had what is euphemistically called “survival sex” in a country where most people live on less than $2.50 a day, the AP found.

Haitian lawyer Mario Joseph has been trying to get compensation for victims of a deadly cholera strain linked to Nepalese peacekeepers that killed an estimated 10,000 people. Now, he is also trying to get child support for about a dozen Haitian women left pregnant by peacekeepers.

“Imagine if the U.N. was going to the United States and raping children and bringing cholera,” Joseph said in Port-au-Prince. “Human rights aren’t just for rich white people.”

U.S. Sen. Bob Corker agrees. The Tennessee Republican, who chairs the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, has been calling for reforms in the United Nations. He may well get them under President Donald Trump, whose administration has proposed a 31% reduction to the U.S. foreign aid and diplomacy budget. Corker and U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley want a review of all missions.

Corker recalled his disgust at hearing of the U.N. sexual abuse cases uncovered last year in Central African Republic.

“If I heard that a U.N. peacekeeping mission was coming near my home in Chattanooga,” he told AP,

“I’d be on the first plane out of here to go back and protect my family.”

The Habitation Leclerc resort was once well known throughout Port-au-Prince as a lush refuge amid the capital’s grimy alleyways. During its heyday in the 1980s, celebrities like Mick Jagger and Jackie Onassis would perch by the pool or stroll past the property’s Voodoo temple.

By 2004, the resort was a decrepit clutch of buildings, and several children, either orphaned or abandoned by their parents, were living in its ruins.

The remains of Habitation Leclerc in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. In the ruins, a group of abandoned children found shelter but were barely surviving. Exploiting that desperation, U.N. peacekeepers lured them into a child sex ring. In August 2007, the U.N. received complaints of “suspicious interactions” between Sri Lankan soldiers and Haitian children, launching an investigation. (Dieu Nalio Chery)

 

It was there that V01 met other victims, two girls referred to in the U.N. report as “V02” and “V03” and a young boy, “V08.” The boy initially supported them by occasionally bringing food from his aunt, but they were often hungry.

The peacekeepers had arrived that year as part of a new mission to help stabilize Haiti in the wake of President Jean-Bertrande Aristide’s ouster. The Sri Lankans, numbering about 900 troops, landed in a historically unstable country in the grip of scattered violence and kidnappings — and a broken government ill-suited to confront the chaos.

Some of the peacekeepers in the Sri Lankan contingent were based near the former resort.

In August 2007, the U.N. received complaints of “suspicious interactions” between Sri Lankan soldiers and Haitian children. U.N. investigators then interviewed nine victims, as well as witnesses, while the sex ring was still active.

V02, who was 16 when the U.N. team interviewed her, told them she had sex with a Sri Lankan commander at least three times, describing him as overweight with a moustache and a gold ring on his middle finger. She said he often showed her a picture of his wife. The peacekeepers also taught her some Sinhalese so she could understand and express sexual innuendo; the children even talked to one another in Sinhalese when U.N. investigators were interviewing them.

V03 identified 11 Sri Lankan troops through photographs, one of whom she said was a corporal with a “distinctive” bullet scar between his armpit and waist. V04, who was 14, said she had sex with the soldiers every day in exchange for money, cookies or juice.

During her interview with investigators, another young victim, V07, received a phone call from a Sri Lankan peacekeeper. She explained that the soldiers would pass along her number to incoming contingent members, who would then call her for sex.

The boy, V08, said he had sex with more than 20 Sri Lankans. Most would remove their name tags before taking him to U.N .military trucks, where he gave them oral sex or was sodomized by them.

Another boy, V09, was 15 when his encounters began. Over the course of three years, he said he had sex with more than 100 Sri Lankan peacekeepers, averaging about four a day, investigators said.

Under Haitian law, having sex with someone under 18 is statutory rape. U.N. codes of conduct also prohibit exploitation.

“The sexual acts described by the nine victims are simply too many to be presented exhaustively in this report, especially since each claimed multiple sexual partners at various locations where the Sri Lankan contingents were deployed throughout Haiti over several years,” the report said.

Investigators showed the children more than 1,000 photographs that included pictures of Sri Lankan troops and locations of where the children had sex with the soldiers.

“The evidence shows that from late 2004 to mid-October 2007, at least 134 military members of the current and previous Sri Lankan contingents sexually exploited and abused at least nine Haitian children,” the report said.

After the report was filed, 114 Sri Lanka peacekeepers were sent home, putting an end to the sex ring.

But the sexual exploitation visited upon Haiti’s people didn’t stop there.

Janila Jean said she was a 16-year-old virgin when a Brazilian peacekeeper lured her to a U.N. compound three years ago with a smear of peanut butter on bread, raped her at gunpoint and left her pregnant. She finds herself constantly in tears.

“Some days, I imagine strangling my daughter to death,” she said in an interview under the shadow of banana palms near the former Jacmel base.

With her were three other women who said they also were raped by peacekeepers. One of them sat on her heels, scraping coconut from its shell and into a large cauldron of water and corn, the barest of meals for the women and their small children.

Janila Jean, 18, carries her daughter in Jacmel, Haiti. Jean said she was 16 years old when a U.N. peacekeeper from Brazil lured her to the U.N. compound, then raped her at gunpoint and left her pregnant. (Dieu Nalio Chery)

 

Adm. Ademir Sobrinho of Brazil’s armed forces said at a conference in London that his force had no such cases of rape, sexual abuse or sexual exploitation.

But like many, Jean didn’t report the rape. Nearly a dozen women interviewed by the AP said they were too scared to report the crimes out of fear they would be blamed — or worse, would meet their victimizers again.

The AP found that some 150 allegations of abuse and exploitation by U.N. peacekeepers and other personnel were reported in Haiti alone between 2004 and 2016, out of the worldwide total of nearly 2,000. Aside from the Sri Lankan sex ring in Haiti, some perpetrators were jailed for other cases.

Alleged abusers came from Bangladesh, Brazil, Jordan, Nigeria, Pakistan, Uruguay and Sri Lanka, according to U.N. data and interviews. More countries may have been involved, but the United Nations only started disclosing alleged perpetrators’ nationalities after 2015.

The litany of abuses is long.

In July 2011, four Uruguayan peacekeepers and their commanding officer allegedly gang-raped a Haitian teenager. The men also filmed the alleged attack on their phones, which went viral on the internet. The men never faced trial in Haiti; four of the five were convicted in Uruguay of “private violence,” a lesser charge. Uruguayan officials said at the time that it was a prank gone wrong and that no rape occurred.

The following year, three Pakistanis attached to the U.N.’s police units in Haiti were allegedly involved in the rape of a mentally disabled 13-year-old in the northern city of Gonaives.

U.N. officials went to Haiti to investigate, but the Pakistanis abducted the boy to keep him from detailing the abuse that had gone on for more than a year, according to Peter Gallo, a former U.N. investigator familiar with the case.

Finally, the men were tried in a Pakistani military tribunal, and eventually sent back to Pakistan. In theory, the tribunal could have allowed for better access to witnesses, but it’s unclear whether any were called. The Pakistani authorities also refused to allow the U.N. to observe the proceedings. In the end, one man was sent to prison for a year, according to Ariane Quentier, a spokeswoman for the Haiti mission.

“It’s an indictment of how the whole U.N. system works,” Gallo told the AP.

Pakistan’s military has refused several requests for comment on the case.

U.N. data during the 12-year period reviewed by AP is incomplete and varies in levels of detail, particularly for cases before 2010. Hundreds of other cases were closed with little to no explanation. In its review, the AP analyzed data from annual reports as well as information from the Office of Internal Oversight Services.

In the wake of the child sex ring investigation, a team of Sri Lankans spent two weeks in Haiti in October 2007. They interviewed only 25 soldiers out of more than 900 in the country and concluded that just two Sri Lankan corporals and one private had sex with two “young” victims. Three soldiers denied sexual encounters but were suspected of lying, according to the U.N. investigation report.

For six months, the Sri Lankan army and the government declined to respond to AP’s questions about the 2007 case. Instead, officials first dodged repeated queries, then gave vague assurances that the scandal represented an isolated incident. Last month, the Sri Lankan government acknowledged its military had conducted inquiries into just 18 soldiers it said were implicated, and that “the U.N. Secretariat has acknowledged in writing, action taken by the Government, and informed that the Secretariat, as of 29 September 2014, considers the matter closed.”

Some of the peacekeepers involved in the ring were still in the Sri Lankan military as of last year, Sri Lankan military officials say. The United Nations, meanwhile, continued to send Sri Lankan peacekeepers to Haiti and elsewhere despite corroborating the child sex ring.

Sri Lankan Defence Secretary Karunasena Hettiarachchi defended the troops, saying, “People are quite happy and comfortable with the peacekeepers.”

Above a rusty bench at an abandoned bus stop in the village of Leogane hangs a sign that reads, “Constructed by the 16th Sri Lanka Peacekeeping Battalion.” It’s one of the few physical reminders of the battalion’s mission — along with children fathered by U.N. personnel.

Marie-Ange Haitis says she met a Sri Lankan commander in December 2006 and he soon began making nighttime visits to her house in Leogane.

“By January, we had had sex,” she said.

“It wasn’t rape, but it wasn’t exactly consensual, either. I felt like I didn’t have a choice.”

Marie-Ange Haitis, 40, stands with her daughter, Samantha, at their home in Leogane, Haiti. Haitis says she met a Sri Lankan commander in December 2006 and he soon began making nighttime visits to her house. (Dieu Nalio Chery)

 

She said when she first realized that she was pregnant, the Haitian translator assigned to the Sri Lankans told her to have an abortion. Then, she said, U.N. officials accused her of lying. As she spoke, her daughter Samantha sat on her lap wearing an oversized pair of sunglasses with a missing lens.

When she was interviewed in August, Haitis said she had been waiting nearly a decade for the U.N. to consider her paternity claim to help support her daughter.

Finally, early this year, Sri Lankan and U.N. officials told AP that a one-time payment of $45,243 had been made for Haitis’ daughter. The United Nations said Sri Lanka accepted the paternity claim without proof of DNA and the commander was dismissed from service.

But such payments are rare.

U.N. officials said they were unable to find any members of the mission in Haiti who might have dealt with the victims in the sex-ring case and did not know what happened to the children.

An Italian non-governmental organization, AVSI, said it helped the children by trying to find homes for them, providing them with counselling and helping reintegrate them into schools, but it also lost track of the children shortly after the country’s devastating 2010 earthquake.

Khare, the U.N. head of field support, acknowledged the scope of the problem and said the global agency must do more to help victims, including gathering accurate information and following up with troop-contributing countries.

“What we all want to see is justice been served for the victims of these horrendous acts,” he said.

An AP review of reports on the conduct of U.N. field missions showed haphazard record-keeping.

In a 2008 report, for example, 19 allegations were reported in Haiti — a number that seemed to contradict the U.N.’s own investigation report in late 2007 that identified nine children and 134 peacekeepers in the sex ring. Before 2010, the number of allegations involving minors was not specified for all U.N. missions.

Some Haitians wonder whether the U.N. has done more harm than good in a country that has endured tragedy after tragedy since it became the first black republic in 1804.

U.N. personnel say they have contributed to the stability in the Caribbean nation over the years, saved lives during the 2010 earthquake’s aftermath and prevented violence during periods of unrest. The mission, which currently has nearly 5,000 personnel and is expected to scale down by October, has also been credited with training police, providing security during elections and support to the judiciary.

“I would not say we have achieved everything we set out to do, but we are engaged in a process of continuous improvement that any harmful effect on the local populations could be minimized, if not completely eradicated,” Khare said.

Many here are not convinced.

“I’d like to see my attacker face to face and tell him how he has destroyed my life,” said 21-year-old Melida Joseph, who said she was raped by one peacekeeper and narrowly escaped being gang-raped in Cite-Soleil, a seaside slum. Like others, she never reported the crime.

“They’ll look at this as one big joke,” she said.

“As far as the U.N. goes, they came here to protect us, but all they’ve brought is destruction.”

Source*

Related Topics:

U.N. Peacekeeper Gang Rapes*

From Child Trafficking to Head of U.N. Ops. in Haiti

With Cover-ups UN Quietly Offers DNA Tests for ‘Peacekeeper Babies’ and Sexual Abuse Claims*

After Creating Haiti’s Cholera Crisis, U.N. Can Barely Fight It*

Haiti Sues U.N. For Cholera Outbreak Which Has Infected 770,000 People | U.N. Claims “Absolute Immunity”*

CIA Plot to Exterminate Haitian Population Exposed*

Media Caught Covering Up Clinton’s Ongoing Looting Of Haiti*

Haiti Rejects Election under Occupation*

UN “Peace” Forces Preying on Haitians*

U.N. ‘Peacekeeping’ Force Open Fire on Protesters in Haiti*

What Hillary Clinton Did To Haiti Should Scare any Voter*

 

Bolivian U.N. Ambassador Blasts U.S. for Another Illegal Attack*

Bolivian U.N. Ambassador Blasts U.S. for Another Illegal Attack*

‘The United States has not only unilaterally attacked,’ said Sacha Llorenti, ‘the United States has become that investigator, has become the prosecutor, has become the judge, has become the jury.’

By Lauren McCauley

“I believe that we must absolutely remember these pictures,” said the Bolivian ambassador. “After the invasion there were 1 million deaths and it launched a series of atrocities in that region.” (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

 

Wielding an image of former U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell during his infamous “weapons of mass destruction” speech that helped make the case for the U.S. invasion of Iraq in 2003, Sacha Llorenti, the Bolivian ambassador to the United Nations, blasted the United States for its unilateral military action against Syria saying it is “vital to remember what history teaches us.”

Llorenti, whose country holds a non-permanent seat on the U.N. Security Council (UNSC) and had called the emergency meeting, said that while members of the body were “discussing and demanding the need for an independent and impartial investigation” into Tuesday’s chemical attack on civilians in Idlib, Syria, the United States was “preparing—once again—to carry out a unilateral attack.

“The United States has not only unilaterally attacked,” Llorenti said,

“the United States has become that investigator, has become the prosecutor, has become the judge, has become the jury. Whereas the investigation would have allowed us to establish an in an objective manner who is responsible for the attacks, this is an extreme, extreme violation of international law.”

The reason for the UNSC, he explained, is that it has “developed instruments of international law to precisely prevent a situation where the most powerful attack the weakest with impunity and to ensure a balance in the world.”

Llorenti further observed that throughout history there were “many episodes in which…various powers…have acted unilaterally and violently. But that it happened once again does not mean that the U.N. must accept it.”

“On Wednesday, February 5, 2003, the U.S. Secretary of State came to this room and came to present to us, according to his own words, “convincing proof that there were weapons of mass destruction in Iraq,'” the ambassador said.

Then, holding the image of Powell, Llorenti continued:

“I believe that we must absolutely remember these pictures…We were told that there were weapons of mass destruction in Iraq and this was the motivation for the invasion. After the invasion there were 1 million deaths and it launched a series of atrocities in that region. Could we talk about [the Islamic State] if that invasion had not taken place? Could we talk about the serious and horrendous attacks in various parts of the world if that illegal invasion had not taken place? I believe it is vital to remember what history teaches us.”

Watch below:

For her part, Nikki Haley, President Donald Trump’s ambassador to the U.N., called the deployment of 59 Tomahawk missiles a “measured step,” and said that the U.S. is “prepared to do more, but we hope it will not be necessary.”

 

Source*

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Media Goes Quiet as Russia Exposes U.S. Lies at Security Council*

Bolivia: Life Exists Beyond the Washington Concensus

Bolivia with Newfound Economic Independence Rejects Rothschild Banks*

Former U.K. Ambassador Refers to the West Returning to their Own Vomit

Inside Syria Life Goes on*

Rothschild Demands Western Nations Invade Syria*

Top Rothschild Bankster Pushes Corrupt Communist to Lead U.N.*

Syria Shoots Down 34 of 59 Cruise Missiles, Russia to Upgrade System*

Cheney, Rothschild, Murdoch Violate International Law By Drilling for Oil in Syria*

U.N. Confirmed Syrian Rebels, Not Assad, Were Using Sarin*

Trump Bombed Syria because they Didn’t Want Peace*

U.S. Deploying Thousands More Ground Troops to Kuwait to Fight in Iraq and Syria*

U.S. Admits Using Radioactive Weapons in Syria that Left Thousands of Iraqi Babies Deformed*

 

U.N. Confirmed Syrian Rebels, Not Assad, Were Using Sarin*

U.N. Confirmed Syrian Rebels, Not Assad, Were Using Sarin*

By Baxter Dmitry

Obama and Trump have blood on their hands. Washington and the mainstream media are lying to you about the chemical weapons attack in Syria, using it as “false flag” – a fake justification to wage an illegal war of aggression.

In 2013 the United Nations issued a report confirming that Syrian opposition rebels (ISIS and Al-Qaeda, supported by Washington) “may have used chemical weapons against Syrian government forces.

At the same time, Assad’s Syrian government called on the United Nations and international observers to come and inspect the sites in which it was found that the rebels had used chemical weapons, including sarin gas. This call was not answered.

The U.N. report from 2013 refutes Washington’s allegations that the government of Bashar al-Assad was using chemical weapons against his own people. The history of chemical weapons usage in Syria lies solely with rebels.

Global Research reports: What the U.N. mission findings confirm is that the U.S. sponsored opposition “rebels” largely composed of Al Qaeda affiliated groups, financed and supported by the Western military alliance were responsible for these 2013 chemical weapons attacks.

Moreover, as confirmed in an earlier report, the Al Qaeda rebels were being trained in the use of chemical weapons by specialists on contract to the Pentagon.

Washington (which supports the opposition rebels in the use of chemical weapons) rather than Damascus is responsible for extensive crimes against humanity.

According to the United Nations 2013 mission led by Carla del Ponte:

evidence from casualties and medical staff indicated that rebel forces in the civil war had used the deadly nerve agent sarin.

‘Our investigators have been in neighbouring countries interviewing victims, doctors and field hospitals, and there are strong, concrete suspicions, but not yet incontrovertible proof, of the use of sarin gas,’ said Del Ponte in an interview with Swiss-Italian television.

‘This was use on the part of the opposition, the rebels, not by the government authorities.’

Last night, the U.N. commission looking into allegations of war crimes in Syria tried to row back on the comments by its human rights investigator, pointing out that conclusive evidence had not been discovered.

However, the White House said it was likely that President Bashar al-Assad’s regime, not the rebels, were behind any chemical weapons use. …
Sarin has been classed as a weapon of mass destruction due to its potency and is banned under international law.

U.S. President Barack Obama has said that the use or deployment of chemical weapons in Syria would cross a ‘red line’ that could lead to foreign military intervention. …

The comments by Ms Del Ponte, a member of the U.N. panel probing alleged war crimes in Syria, contradict claims by Britain and the U.S. that intelligence reports showed Syrian soldiers had used chemical weapons.

She said that the United Nations independent commission of inquiry on Syria has not yet seen evidence of government forces having used chemical weapons, which are banned under international law. (See Daily Mail Online, May 6, 2013)

Source*

Related Topics:

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Media Goes Quiet as Russia Exposes U.S. Lies at Security Council*

Former U.K. Ambassador Refers to the West Returning to their Own Vomit

U.S.-led Coalition Aircrafts Kill 15 Civilians in Raqqa, Syria*

Dyncorp, the Private Military Corporation at the Heart of U.S. Foreign Policy Scandal*

Pentagon Trained Al Qaeda in Syria to Use Chemical Weapons*

World War 3: Trump Begins Paying His Penance to Rothschilds*

Media Goes Quiet as Russia Exposes U.S. Lies at Security Council*

Media Goes Quiet as Russia Exposes U.S. Lies at Security Council*

 

Nikki Haley shows photos of Assads alleged victims at the Security Council

 

Russia just called out the West for using the UN to promote regime change — but no one reported it

By Richard Brandt

Twitter was flooded with commentary about Nikki Haley’s call to arms against Russia during the Security Council meeting on Wednesday afternoon. But no one bothered to report what Russia had to say.

Russia’s deputy United Nations ambassador Vladimir Safronkov said that the West’s “obsession with regime change is what hinders this Security Council.

He noted that for Washington and its partners, “everything is guided by regime change” and allegations that Assad used chemical weapons in an attack in Idlib province on Tuesday are based on “falsified reports from the White Helmets“, an organization that has been “discredited long ago”.

Can someone tell us what were these kids doing inside a secret Qaeda hideout dug deep inside a mountain?! Another cheap WH act! pic.twitter.com/brNKcX9zTm

— Fares Shehabi (@ShehabiFares) April 4, 2017

He further added that “taking [the White Helmets] at face value is not professional and not serious.”

Another angle of the “fire hose” location: Seems to be a #WhiteHelmets base, with hideouts dug into the rock pic.twitter.com/Vvl5bA12Q6

— Ian Grant (@Gjoene) April 4, 2017

Safronkov pointed out that “the White Helmets are getting mixed up in their reports. Their versions keep changing. They speak of bombs from helicopters, then from planes”.

Russia’s Vladimir Safronkov exposes #WhiteHelmets, blasts imperialists, trashes report at UNSC. #SyriaGasAttack

— Zain Mankani (@zainmankani) April 5, 2017

Russia’s U.N. representative observed that in “photos and videos we see the White Helmets acting very unprofessionally. Their behavior is very relaxed in these extreme circumstances. All of this is clearly meant to provoke. All of this has been reflected in the resolution.”

Safronkov then asks the U.S., U.K. and France: “Did this event take place? Have you even checked what you wrote?”

Russia’s representative finished by slamming the U.K. for blaming Russia for the deaths of children in Syria. He said that the U.K. “does nothing” for Syria except “submit drafts meant to provoke” and “pressure investigations” into reporting politically favorable results.

We can’t find a single mainstream report that focuses solely on Safronkov’s comments.

Apparently the media can’t even identify who Safronkov is.

Here’s how the geniuses at the Interpreter reported this — but misidentifying the person who was actually speaking. What’s the difference? They’re all Russians:

So far nothing RU ambassador Pyotr Ilichov is saying is true. This speech is just filled with conspiracy hashtags like Alex Jones’s SEO

— James Miller (@Millermena) April 5, 2017

There’s something very wrong when the media won’t even report the other side.

 

Source*

Related Topics:

Former U.K. Ambassador Refers to the West Returning to their Own Vomit

Pentagon Trained Al Qaeda in Syria to Use Chemical Weapons*

World War 3: Trump Begins Paying His Penance to Rothschilds*

U.S. Missile Strike Killed People Fighting Terrorists*

Syrian chemical False Flag use of Dummies Identified*

Deep State in Panic Mode, Creating Events to Distract from their Activities*

U.S. Just Admitted “ISIS HQ” They Blew Up Was Actually an Innocent Family’s Home*

How America Betrayed its Sunni Allies in Middle East?

The FBI Played a Central Role in the First ISIS Attack on U.S. Soil*

Disturbing Message to All Americans from Former Defense Minister of Canada on the NWO*

Dyncorp, the Private Military Corporation at the Heart of U.S. Foreign Policy Scandal*

Dyncorp, the Private Military Corporation at the Heart of U.S. Foreign Policy Scandal*

By Elizabeth Vos

Over ten years ago, Georgia Congresswoman Cynthia McKinney asked Donald Rumsfeld during a hearing on the proposed 2006 Department for Defense Budget:

“Mr. Secretary, is it policy of the U.S. government to reward companies that traffic in women and little girls? That’s my first question.”

McKinney’s query, broadcast on C-SPAN, received few solid answers.

Cynthia McKinney is not the only legislator who has asked questions about the role and funding of U.S. paramilitary organizations. Janice Schakowsky, a Democrat Representative of Chicago was quoted by The New York Times:

”Is the U.S. military privatizing its missions to avoid public controversy or embarrassment — to hide body bags from the media and shield the military from public opinion?”… “ the contractors… don’t have to follow the same chain of command, the military code of conduct may or may not apply, the accountability is absent and the transparency is absent — but the money keeps flowing.”

The New York Times article described the essential problem of the government using private contractors like Dyncorp: “Outsourcing military missions also lets the Pentagon do things Congress might not approve… while the Pentagon has secrets, it also fundamentally recognizes that it is a public institution. Not so the contractors, whose first allegiance is to their shareholders.”

Dan Baum wrote in his 2003 article Guns For Hire: “DynCorp offers the military an alternative to itself.”

Cynthia McKinney served six terms in the United States House of Representatives. She left the Democratic Party in 2008, and ran as the Presidential candidate of the Green Party of the United States.

 

In addition to its paramilitary endeavors in the field, Dyncorp has placed heavy emphasis on IT. It became heavily involved in the software industry in the 1990’s under the leadership of Paul Lombardi. In 2003, Dyncorp was acquired by “Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC),” primarily a software firm providing services such as: “various cloud offerings, including Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), private cloud solutions, CloudMail and Storage as a Service (SaaS).”

Dyncorp’s early emphasis on IT while under the leadership of Lombardi and CSC may explain part of Cynthia McKinney’s question for Donald Rumsfeld. She demanded on record to be told who had received IT contracts at the DOD and other departments which had “lost” trillions of dollars. McKinney asked during the Department of Defense Budget hearing:

“My second question, Mr. Secretary, is, who has the contract today to make those systems communicate with each other? How long have they had those contracts? And how much have the taxpayers paid for them?”

McKinney’s question was answered by Ms. Tina Jonas, who refused to give names on the record. Ms Jonas served as the “chief financial officer and assistant director of the Finance Division,” of the FBI before she was “nominated by President Bush to be the undersecretary of defense at the Department of Defense.” She has also held leading positions in numerous private companies associated with aerospace and defense.

CSC has also been investigated for fraud, with Margaret Hodge describing it as a “rotten company providing a hopeless system.”

In 2010, Dyncorp International became a subsidiary of Cerberus in a deal valued at $1.5 billion. Cerberus’ founder has been described as “a notable backer of Republican candidates… [who] served on Mr. Trump’s economic advisory council.”

From Salon’s 2002 Article “Crime without punishment,” by Robert Capps

 

However, Republicans like Donald Rumsfeld have not been the only defenders of Dyncorp. A 2009 email released by wikileaks reveals Cheryl Mills warning then- Secretary of State Hillary Clinton of a possible upcoming Washington Post article. The expose would describe an event where Dyncorp employees had hired a 15 year old boy to do “mock lap dances,” with “DynCorp employees putting dollar bills in the boy’s waistband, just as they would a stripper’s garter.” Additional Wikileaks cables described the event in terms of “purchasing a service from a child,” emphasizing strategies to convince a journalist not to cover the story in order to not “risk lives.”

Although the email between Mills and Hillary claims “no sex took place,” the tradition of bachabaze in Afghanistan often involves rape, the boys “sold to the highest bidder.” BBC News reports: “The most disturbing thing is what happens after the parties. Often the boys are taken to hotels and sexually abused…There are many people who support this tradition across Afghanistan and many of them are very influential.”” BBC News also interviewed a bacha who reported that: ”Sometimes he is gang raped.” Meanwhile CBS News reported described Dyncorp’s “Dancing Afghan Boy Problem.”

Photograph from The Daily Mail article: “The secret shame of Afghanistan’s bacha bazi ‘dancing boys’ who are made to dress like little girls, then abused by paedophiles”

 

Dyncorp’s involvement in another a sex scandal with minors while serving in a war torn country may well have felt like deja vu for the Secretary of State, considering the infamous Dyncorp scandal in the Balkans during Bill Clinton’s term in office.

Ben Johnston filed a RICO lawsuit against Dyncorp after he was fired ostensibly for reporting human rights abuses by their employees in Bosnia. In a 2002 report titled “Dyncorp Disgrace,” Johnston was quoted:

“…None of the girls… were from Bosnia… They were imported in by DynCorp and the Serbian mafia. These guys would say ‘I gotta go to Serbia this weekend topick up three girls.’… “DynCorp leadership was 100% in bed with the mafia over there.”

Salon reported:

“Johnston recoiled in horror when he heard one of his fellow helicopter mechanics at a U.S. Army base near Tuzla, Bosnia, brag one day in early 2000: “My girl’s not a day over 12….… the bragging about a 12-year-old sex slave pushed Johnston over the edge. “I had to do something,” he says. “There were kids involved.” …. At least 13 DynCorp employees have been sent home from Bosnia … for purchasing women or participating in other prostitution-related activities. But despite large amounts of evidence in some cases, none of the DynCorp employees sent home have faced criminal prosecution.

Johnston’s RICO lawsuit was not the only instance of wrongdoing to come out of Dyncorp’s U.N. peace keeping contract in Bosnia. The Guardian wrote: ”Kathryn Bolkovac, from Nebraska, was sacked by Dyncorp of Virginia, to which peacekeeping police work in Bosnia had been outsourced…” “She signed up with DynCorp, providing American personnel for the U.N…” Bolkavac’s story was later fictionalized into the film Whistleblower, starring Rachel Weisz.

Poster for the film The Whistleblower, starring Rachel Weisz

 

The Oxford Journal of Conflict and Security Law published an article which read:

”U.N. military peacekeepers are increasingly being accused of human rights abuses while deployed on U.N. missions. These personnel are rarely held accountable for their conduct given that they are granted immunity from criminal prosecution by the host State by a plethora of legal instruments, in particular a Status of Forces Agreement (SOFA).”

The contractors fell into a legal grey area between a broken Bosnian legal system and American military oversight. Washington University Global Studies Law Review also published:

“U.N. Peacekeepers and Sexual Abuse and Exploitation: An End to Impunity.” Author Elizabeth F. Defeis wrote: “The United Nations … stands accused of egregious acts of sexual abuse and exploitation committed by U.N. peacekeepers and civilian personnel.” Authorities claimed the Dayton Peace Accord put the men under Bosnian authority, while the U.N. affords legal immunity to peacekeepers

Culpability was further complicated by the international nature of Dyncorp and its subsidiaries. The Guardian explained:

“Although Dyncorp was an American company, her [Bolkovac’s] contract was governed under the laws of England.” Despite Dyncorp International’s being located in Texas, “Dyncorp Aerospace in Aldershot is a British Firm… a British subsidiary of the U.S. company DynCorp Inc.”

Ben Johnston eventually settled out of court , while Bolkovac won her case against Dyncorp. Salon reported:

“both Johnston and his attorney said they viewed the settlement as a victory — and as a vindication after two years of fighting the company.”

The New York Times related Bolkovac’s victory:

“A British tribunal has ruled that a former member of the U.N. police force in Bosnia was unfairly fired after she reported to her superiors that colleagues in the police force used women and children as sex slaves in connivance with Balkan traffickers.” The Telegraph also reported: “The tribunal stated, ‘It is hard to imagine a case in which a firm has behaved in a more callous manner.”

Kathryn Bolkovac, who was featured in The Telegraph’s article, “What the U.N. Doesn’t Want You to Know”

 

In the aftermath of Bosnia, the United States demanded heightened immunity for Americans serving as U.N. peacekeepers, as opposed to increased accountability. Dyncorp continued to receive contracts.

The U.N. was implicated in further sex abuse scandals in nations where peace keepers operate with immunity. In 2012 Reuters reported:

“Two U.N. peacekeepers from Pakistan have been sentenced to a year in prison for raping a 14-year-old Haitian boy… Several peacekeepers have been accused of rape, in addition to the Pakistanis, in cases that have fueled public protests and demands that members of the U.N. force be stripped of their immunity and face trial in Haitian courts.” U.N. Peace Keepers were also reported to have been caught on video raping an eighteen year old Haitian youth.

In The Guardian’s article: Report reveals shame of U.N. peacekeepers:

“Embarrassment caused by the misconduct of U.N. forces [in] Haiti, Sierra Leone, Bosnia, Cambodia, East Timor and the Democratic Republic of the Congo(DRC) … [troops] … were regularly having sex with girls aged as young as 12, sometimes in the mission’s administrative buildings.”

The situation in Haiti was so serious that BBC reported Sri Lanka had: ”promised to look into allegations that 108 of its U.N. peacekeepers in Haiti paid for sex, in some cases with underage girls …more than 700 peacekeepers in Ivory Coast were suspended…”

Dyncorp was once again contracted to provide troops for the U.N. in Haiti during this period.

In 2015 Rosa Freedman, senior lecturer at Birmingham Law School wrote in an article published by CNN:

“Why do peacekeepers have immunity in sex abuse cases?” She explained:

“The problem is not new. Over the last two decades, peacekeepers have been accused of abuses in Liberia, Congo, Bosnia and Haiti. Personnel have forced women and children to have sex in exchange for food, have trafficked women into U.N. missions and systematically raped them, and have committed other egregious acts of sexual violence

In 2011, “DynCorp agreed to pay the United States $7.7 million to resolve allegations that it submitted inflated claims for the construction of container camps at various locations in Iraq.” In 2009 The Washington Post had reported that Dyncorp was being forced to “Replace the senior managers… after [The State Department] launched an investigation into the company’s handling of an employee who died of a possible drug overdose.” Dyncorp reportedly lost $1 billion it was given by the State Department to train Iraqi police .

Despite all of this, as late as December last year, Dyncorp received a new $94 million contract with the U.S. Navy. Dyncorp will:

“facilitate humanitarian aid, civic assistance, minor military construction and contingency programs to support exercises and other initiatives…”

The numerous scandals embroiling Dyncorp over the years have exemplified McKinney’s first question to Rumsfeld; “Why do these companies continue to receive government contracts?”

Source*

Related Topics:

DynCorp Mercenaries Replace Blackwater Mercenaries in Yemen*

Two-Thirds of Afghanistan Reconstruction Money Went to DynCorp International*

Trump is Filling Top Pentagon and Homeland Security Positions With Defense Contractors*

The U.S. Spent a Half Billion on Mining in Afghanistan with ‘Limited Progress’*

U.N. Peacekeeper Gang Rapes*

With Cover-ups UN Quietly Offers DNA Tests for ‘Peacekeeper Babies’ & Sexual Abuse Claims*

Pentagon Approves U.N. Use of Force against Civilians*

From Child Trafficking to Head of U.N. Ops. in Haiti

U.N. ‘Peacekeeping’ Force Open Fire on Protesters in Haiti*

After Creating Haiti’s Cholera Crisis, U.N. Can Barely Fight It*

U.S. Rape and Sodomy of Iraqi Women and Children*

U.S. Soldiers Raped Boys in Front of Their Mothers*

Japan Officially asked the U.S. to Stop Military-related Rapes*

U.S. Sponsors Rape in Congo*

50,000+ Okinawans Gather for anti-U.S. Military Rally after another Rape and Murder by U.S. Soldier*

Children Sexually Assaulted at E.U.’s Official Refugee Camps*

 

After Creating Haiti’s Cholera Crisis, U.N. Can Barely Fight It*

After Creating Haiti’s Cholera Crisis, U.N. Can Barely Fight It*

After years of dodging responsibility, the U.N. is now struggling to help fight the health scourge it created.

It was seven years ago when the outbreak first began. In the last near-decade, Haiti’s cholera outbreak has ravaged hundreds of thousands of lives — killing nearly 10,000 and sickening nearly 800,000 more.

Brought to the country by United Nations peacekeeping forces meant to protect Haitians, the disease shows no sign of slowing down in the region. And after years of dodging responsibility, the international body is now struggling to help fight the health crisis it created.

It wasn’t until December 2016 that then-U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon apologized for Haiti’s cholera outbreak. It was also only then that he proclaimed a “moral responsibility” to end the crisis, announcing in a rare act of contrition a US$400 million strategy that would “provide material assistance and support” to victims.

But the trust fund created to finance the strategy has so far raised only around US$2 million, with just 6 of 193 member states donating.

Last month, Ban’s successor, Antonio Guterres, sent a letter to member states asking for pledges to the trust fund, adding that mandatory dues would be raised if there were no significant pledges by March 6. But the deadline came and went with little response.

Donations to the fund may also now face challenges given the Trump administration’s signalled intention to cut foreign aid. The United States is the U.N.’s biggest single financing source.

The inaction has worsened Haiti’s crisis. Just this year, nearly 2,000 new cases have been reported, amounting to hundreds a week.

“We still have the biggest outbreak of cholera of any country anywhere,” Dr. Louise Ivers, a senior policy adviser at Partners in Health, an international medical aid organization working in Haiti, told the New York Times.

“Here we are, nearly seven years later, and it’s still a big problem.”

The U.N.’s own independent investigator on extreme poverty and human rights, Philip Alston, issued a scathing report condemning the U.N.’s failure to take responsibility for the cholera crisis, calling it “morally unconscionable, legally indefensible and politically self-defeating.”

A country that has suffered from an extensive history of colonial and imperial meddling, Haiti’s cholera outbreak is just the latest in this trajectory. After Hurricane Matthew devastated the region last year, Haitians pressed foreigners to refrain from donating to the American Red Cross, pointing to a reputation of questionable use of funds.

Haitians lost trust in the U.S.-based organization after a damning 2015 report by NPR and ProPublica showed how the Red Cross used more than US$500 million in aid for the 2010 earthquake to build only six of the promised 700 permanent homes.

The question of aid and relief also placed the Clinton Foundation, co-founded by former Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and her partner and former President Bill Clinton, under the spotlight again for failing to use billions of dollars of aid collected for the country following the 2010 earthquake.

While millions of dollars were spent by the foundation on formaldehyde-riddled trailers distributed by Clayton Homes — a top Clinton campaign donor — much of the US$6 billion that the Clintons pledged for the country had yet to be used. And in turn, the faulty trailers caused headaches and illness for those who used them.

In addition, according to WikiLeaks cables, Clinton also lobbied against a minimum wage hike in Haiti back in 2008 and 2009, colluding with corporations taking advantage of sweatshop labour in Haiti to pressure the government to veto the wage increase to keep labor cheap.

Now, adding insult to injury, the United Nations has failed to deliver on promises of getting the cholera outbreak under control after years of wreaking havoc on the poverty and disaster-stricken half-island nation.

Source*

Related Topics:

U.N. Offers Half Apology to Haiti for Cholera Outbreak*

Haiti Sues U.N. For Cholera Outbreak Which Has Infected 770,000 People | U.N. Claims “Absolute Immunity”*

U.S. Plan to Spread Cholera across Syria and Turkey May be Failing*

U.S. Dropped Insects Carrying Anthrax, Cholera, Encephalitis, and Bubonic Plague on North Korea*

When Man Thinks He’s God, he Releases GMO Cholera Bacteria into our Environment*

From Child Trafficking to Head of U.N. Ops. in Haiti

U.N. ‘Peacekeeping’ Force Open Fire on Protesters in Haiti*

Media Caught Covering Up Clinton’s Ongoing Looting Of Haiti*

Dubai’s Emir Flies over £250,000 of Aid to Haiti in his Private Jet*

New U.N. Chief is a Globalist, Socialist, Extremist*