Tag Archive | Ramadhan

How Muslims and Hindus of Tando Adam came together in Ramadhan*

How Muslims and Hindus of Tando Adam came together in Ramadhan*

By Manoj Genani (photo credit)

Fasting through the month of June, Pakistanis across the nation had to deal with a scorching summer, while trying to abstain from all the delicacies they would later enjoy on Eid. Even though the majority of the month went by without incident, the last few days of Ramadhan proved a grim prelude to what should be a festive period.

It is no secret that certain elements in Pakistan want to divide Pakistanis based on their caste and creed through spreading fear and vitriol. However, locals in the small city of Tando Adam proved that despite a difference in their beliefs, consideration and understanding of each others cultures and traditions is what Pakistan needs to exist as a diverse society.

Coming together for Iftar, the Hindu and Muslim communities of Tando Adam showed that they can coexist in a multicultural city. The Hindu Panchayat hosted an evening vegetarian Iftar party and distributed Eid gifts and goods to 350 impoverished families.

A young man lays the table for the guests for the evening’s diverse Iftar party

 

The vegetarian menu included plenty of fruits.

 

Hindus and Muslims join hands in a collective prayer towards unity and religious harmony

 

Hindu religious leader Raju Baba feeding his Muslim compatriot after hearing the Adhan

 

“This is our home. We are one, we have to respect each other and take care of each other’s beliefs & values,” claimed Raju Baba, a leader of the Hindu community, adding that they have been living this way for centuries, with “peace and pluralism.”

Before the Iftar party women of all ages from low income households gathered to collect Eid gifts being distributed by the Hindu Panchayat and Odero Lal Welfare Organisation. Unable to afford Eid supplies on their own, the women walked away content with food, clothes and shoes for themselves and the family.

Women sat patiently as they waited for the distribution of Eid supplies

 

Women of all ages showed up to the distribution ceremony

 

Some ladies were grateful as they hadn’t been Eid shopping for a couple of years due to low wages or unemployment.

Elderly women who would normally have to work extra hours to afford the gifts were particularly content.

 

Women were able to walk away, knowing that they would be able to celebrate a colourful Eid

 

The local Hindu community gathered these gifts, fearing that low income families would be unable to celebrate Eid like the rest of the nation.

“We collected funds from the Hindu Panchayat and delivered Eid gifts to impoverished Muslim families,” said Dileep Kumar Kohistani, an organiser of the Iftar party.

Ghulam Nabi Nizamani from the Social Welfare Department was of the view that religious issues were at a low in Sindh and people were reluctant of these kind of activities due to extremism in Pakistan. However, the reemergence of such events is key for the revival of religious harmony.

At the end of the day the communities were lauded for their efforts of showing a peaceful and harmonious, multicultural society

Source*

Related Topics:

Iraqis Travel to Mosul to Celebrate Eid in a Show of Solidarity*

I’m a Pakistani Hindu. So what Business do I have Missing Eid?

Muslims Across the World Celebrate Eid Al-Fitr*

Jeremy Corbyn Praises Muslim Heroes of Grenfell Tower fire in Eid Message*

Syria’s More Confident Assad gives Eid Prayers in Hama*

These 5 People don’t Spend Eid with their Families to make the Occasion Happier for Us*

God-consciousness After Ramadhan

Iraqis Travel to Mosul to Celebrate Eid in a Show of Solidarity*

Iraqis Travel to Mosul to Celebrate Eid in a Show of Solidarity*

By Sali Mahdy

 

‘Mosul celebrates first Eid in three years with the Eid in Mosul campaign’ uploaded on June 28, 2017 by the AlMawsleya channel.

A group of around 300 Iraqis recently traveled from south and central Iraq to Mosul to celebrate the Eid al-Fitr holiday with their newly liberated compatriots.

In the summer of 2014, the militant group Islamic State (also known as ISIS, ISIL, and Daesh) drove out Iraqi security forces and seized control of Mosul, Iraq’s second largest city, in a territorial sweep of much of northern Iraq.

It was in Mosul that the militant group’s leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, declared an Islamic Caliphate spanning Syria and Iraq.

Since then, life for Mosul’s residents has been one of fear, oppression, and hardship.

Daily life changed for the worse with the persecution of minorities, food and fuel shortages, and intimidation and harsh punishment.

An effort to retake the city by Iraqi security forces began in October 2016. After eight months of intense battle just a handful of neighbourhoods remain under the group’s control, prompting Iraqi Prime Minister Haidar al-Abadi to recently declare the end of the Islamic State.

The “Eid in Mosul” campaign was organized by a group of Iraqi activists led by Hamid al-Sayed, Ali al-Touki, and Mohammed al-Raji.

Originally an idea to visit old friends who had been trapped under Islamic State rule, the plan turned into a full-blown campaign after generating enormous interest on Facebook. More than 1,700 people expressed interest in joining the trip but security conditions would only allow 300.

This Eid was the first in three years in which Maslawis (people of Mosul) were able to publicly celebrate. The day was filled with events forbidden under the Islamic State, including poetry readings, theatre, and live music. Mosul’s visitors also brought a gift of more than 1,000 books from Baghdad as part of the “I am Iraq, I Read” campaign, an initiative promoting culture and a more educated Iraq. This gift is a start to replacing thousands of books destroyed in Mosul’s libraries by the Islamic State.

The day was joyous, bringing together Iraqis to not only celebrate the holiday, but to also celebrate the liberation of Mosul. Scenes hit social media of men and women from across the country singing the national anthem and chanting

“Brothers, Sunnis and Shia, this country is not for sale,” demonstrating a feeling of unbreakable unity shared among Iraqis.

While the event was mostly organized by activists, the government stepped in to help providing transportation and security for the event.

 

Men and women of Mosul greeted the “freedom caravan” at Mosul University.

 

Crowds gather chanting “welcome to Mosul” and singing the national anthem.

 

 

Over 1,000 books donated to restock Mosul’s libraries.

Ameen Mukdad, violinist from Mosul, plays a traditional Maslawi folk song.

The evening concluded with a fireworks display celebrating Eid and Mosul’s liberation.

Source*

Related Topics:

Iraq Declares ‘fall’ of ISIS as Military Retakes Landmark Mosul Mosque*

U.K. to Consider Stripping Tony Blair of Immunity over Role in Iraq War*

Iraqi Top Cleric Hailed by Iraqi Prime Minister in his Role in the Fight against ISIS*

Federal Judge Puts Immediate Stop to Deportations of 1,444 Iraqis in U.S.*

Syrian Army, Hezbollah Reaches Border with Iraq for the First Time in Years*

The Treasure at the Heart of Iraq

Life returns to Hammar Marshes, Iraq*

Ex British Ambassador Tells How U.K., US, and George Bush Sr. Scripted Iraq and Afghanistan Wars*

Trump-Israel Struggling to Save ISIS to divide and Conquer Syria and Iraq*

I’m a Pakistani Hindu. So what Business do I have Missing Eid?

I’m a Pakistani Hindu. So what Business do I have Missing Eid?

By Nisha Pinjani

Last summer during Ramadhan, I shared the Shan Masala Eid commercial like Pakistanis all over the world. The ad showed two brothers spending the occasion away from home. For the purposes of the advert, a simple plate of Sindhi biryani was the balm to their feeling of homesickness.

This year, I found myself in the characters’ shoes.

Away from Pakistan for my graduate studies in Honolulu, Hawaii, I was scrolling through Facebook when I found the usual Eid-related posts flooding my timeline.

Unending stories about tailors and broken promises, event pages for chand raat meet­-ups, and the perpetual confusion on whether the next day would be Eid or another Roza (followed promptly by jokes at the Ruet­-i-­Hilal committee’s expense).

Soon enough, WhatsApp groups were abuzz with ‘Chand Mubarak’ wishes. While my friends in Karachi made plans to grab chai on the eve before Eid, I was literally stuck on an island. Sitting alone in my dorm room, I couldn’t help but feel blue — I missed home, my friends and my family.

I found myself thinking back to the Shan commercial. But while the ad’s protagonist and I were experiencing similar homesickness, we were quite dissimilar. He was a Muslim man from Pakistan; I am Pakistani Hindu woman.

What business do I have missing Eid?

Growing up as a Hindu in an Islamic republic is full of contradictions. My mother is often hesitant and wary of my Muslim friends. A bit strange, considering she is more than happy if I invite them to our home.

Perhaps this perplexing attitude is passed down through generations. As a young girl I loved listening to my grandfather’s partition stories. He would tell us incidents where Muslims went door-to-door killing any Hindu in sight (I’m sure Muslims grow up with similar stories of cold-blooded Hindus).

But then, he would also talk about his Muslim neighbours. The ones who protected our family, who made a human chain around our house when the riots broke out.

The obvious takeaway here was that good and bad people exist everywhere. But my grandfather’s stories carried an underlying warning: you can get close to Muslims, but remember that you are not one of them (and they know it too).

Following this tradition of mixed messages, every Ramadhan, many Hindus living in Pakistan fast. My mother herself happily sets an alarm to wake my sister up for sehri. She prepares an elaborate sehri, and reminiscent of the Thadri festival — where Hindus fast — her fried lolis make an appearance at the table.

No one else in my house wakes up with them, but we make it a point to join in for Iftar, and jokingly try to convince my sister that eating five minutes before the adhan is acceptable.

And then comes Eid. At least in Pakistan, Eid and Diwali have much in common. Both are marked by an abundance of mithai. It is customary to wear new clothes if one can afford them, and like Eidi on Eid, it is traditional to give presents on Diwali too. Every year, my family welcomes our friends over for Diwali, and come Eid, we visit our Muslim friends’ houses.

Yet, each time a story breaks of another Hindu girl being kidnapped and forcefully converted, my interactions with male Muslim friends start causing my mother distress. “Be careful around Muslim boys,” she warns me. It is frustrating, but I can see where she is coming from.

When I heard news of the Hindu reporter in Karachi who was forced to drink from a separate glass, my blood boiled. Sitting thousands of miles away, I was instantly transported back to my childhood when something similar happened to me (and I am sure, many religious minorities like me): a classmate had refused to share utensils with me because I was Hindu.

Children’s acts are a reflection of what they are taught at home. Many years later, seeing this news was a bitter reminder that even among supposedly educated, well-knowing adults, prejudice is alive and well.

The white in the flag

I have long known that despite having the same nationality, my Muslim friends back home and I are different in many ways.

During Pakistan Studies classes in school, teachers would make irresponsible claims about how Hindus were single-handedly responsible for the loss of Muslim lives. Reduced to a ‘cow-worshipper’ during the lectures, I would suddenly be othered, excluded, bullied.

As I grew up, my ‘otherness’ interestingly became exotic. The same identity I had been bullied over now became my ticket to being a ‘cool kid’— since I had access to all the firecrackers (thank you, Diwali), and invitations to holi parties.

As we grew up underneath the layers of systemically taught hate, my Muslim friends and I began to find common ground, and developed a better understanding of each other. I would sneak them into our temples so they could get a glimpse of my world, and accompany them to Mughal­ era mosques to get a sense of theirs.

I still come across a simpleton or two who wants me to prove my Pakistani-ness. Every time Pakistan plays a cricket match against India, there is always that one guy who wants to know, “How come you’re not supporting the Indian team instead?”

Thankfully, more often than not, my friends take over the task of shutting such bigotry down.

I keep thinking back to my family enjoying their long Eid break in Pakistan. We are a huge family, and most of my cousins are older, working people. On Diwali (a working day for most Pakistani Hindus until recently) we are usually only able to manage a dinner, however, the longer Eid holidays are quality family time for us.

During Eid, we get together at a farmhouse or the beach. We laze around playing cards, barbecuing, and catching up on gossip. Eid mornings mean waking up to seviyan and other breakfast treats, with my uncles over, watching the news and discussing the current state of affairs in Karachi.

Away from home, I find myself missing it all. Whether it is the memory of spending time with my family by the waves; or the calming sound of the adhan; or Eid plans with my friends to get mehendi.

Home, after all, is home, no matter how dysfunctional.

And so, on the first day of Eid in Hawaii, not unlike the characters in the Shan Masala advert, I picked up a packet of seviyan from a desi store here. I looked up the recipe online, managing to burn half the packet, and cursed myself for never waking up early with my mother to help out.

But my friends came over and made custard and fruit salad. I ended up spending the day recreating what Eid has always been about for me back home in Pakistan: good company, laughter, and a satisfied stomach. It was heartening watching my American friends try seviyan for the first time, while assuring them that the delicacy is indeed supposed to look semi-charred.

Source*

Related Topics:

Muslims Across the World Celebrate Eid Al-Fitr*

Jeremy Corbyn Praises Muslim Heroes of Grenfell Tower fire in Eid Message*

U.S.-led Coalition Killed Nearly 500 Civilians in Syria during Ramadhan*

These 5 People don’t Spend Eid with their Families to make the Occasion Happier for Us*

Eid Mubarak- final Ramadan Reflection 2011

Muslims Across the World Celebrate Eid Al-Fitr*

Muslims Across the World Celebrate Eid Al-Fitr*

Eid al-Fitr, or the “feast of breaking of the fast” marks the end of Ramadhan, the Islamic holy month of fasting.

With Muslims making almost one-quarter of the World’s population, celebrations are taking place in all continents.

The sun rises above a mosque before the morning prayer for Eid al-Fitr in Lipljan, Kosovo, June 25, 2017.

 

Muslims perform Eid al-Fitr prayers in Al-zahara square in Juba, South Sudan June 25, 2017.

Women offer Eid prayers at Badshahi Mosque in Lahore

 

Men greet each other after the Eid prayers in Karachi

 

Indian Muslims offer prayers during Eid at the Jama Masjid mosque in New Delhi

 

Iraqis offer Eid prayers in the city of Najaf

 

Iranian women offer Eid prayers in western Tehran

 

Chinese Muslims visit Niujie mosque during Eid in Beijing

 

Chinese Muslims offer Eid prayers at the Niujie mosque in Beijing

 

 

Egyptians celebrate and try to catch balloons released after Eid al-Fitr prayers, marking the end of the Muslim holy fasting month of Ramadhan at a public park, outside El-Seddik Mosque in Cairo, Egypt June 25, 2017

 

Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad (3rd R) attends prayers on the first day of the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Fitr, inside a mosque in Hama, in this handout picture provided by SANA on June 25, 2017, Syria

 

Iraqi children enjoy riding a mini car as they celebrate Eid al-Fitr, in Mosul, Iraq June 25, 2017.

Muslims in Indonesia mark the end of the Muslim holy fasting month of Ramadhan.

 

Sri Lankan Muslims offer Eid prayers at the Galle Face esplanade in Colombo

 

Muslims in Thailand mark the end of the Muslim holy fasting month of Ramadhan.

 

Muslims in the Philippines mark the end of the Muslim holy fasting month of Ramadhan.

 

Afghan children ride on swings during the first day of the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Fitr, which marks the end of the holy month of Ramadan, in Kabul, Afghanistan June 25, 2017.

 

 

Displaced Iraqi girls who fled their homes pose as they celebrate Eid al-Fitr, in Mosul, Iraq June 25, 2017.

 

Muslims in Taiwan mark the end of the Muslim holy fasting month of Ramadhan.

 

Men pray at the martyrs’ cemetery on Eid al-Fitr in Racak, Kosovo, June 25, 2017.

 

 

Source*

Related Topics:

Jeremy Corbyn Praises Muslim Heroes of Grenfell Tower fire in Eid Message*

Guyana President joins Muslims for Ramadhan Iftar*

Syria’s More Confident Assad gives Eid Prayers in Hama*

n Praises Muslim Heroes of Grenfell Tower fire in Eid Message*

These 5 People don’t Spend Eid with their Families to make the Occasion Happier for Us*

God-consciousness After Ramadhan

 

Jeremy Corbyn Praises Muslim Heroes of Grenfell Tower fire in Eid Message*

Jeremy Corbyn Praises Muslim Heroes of Grenfell Tower fire in Eid Message*

 

 

In his Eid al-Fitr message to British Muslims, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn praises the Muslim heroes of the Grenfell Tower fire who bravely came to the rescue of residents after Tarawih prayers.

Source*

Related Topics:

London Residents Speak the Truth about the Grenfell Tower Fire

For British MP Grenfell Tower Fire Was an Inside Job*

Grenfell Tower Block Fire Survivors Storm London Town Hall*

Grenfell Tower Resident Praise Muslim Youth for their Bravery in Helping Survivors*

Muslims Ramadhan Waking may have saved Grenfell Tower Residents’ Lives*

27 Apartment Blocks in 15 areas fail Fire Tests – UK gov’t*

 

Guyana President joins Muslims for Ramadhan Iftar*

Guyana President joins Muslims for Ramadhan Iftar*

President David Granger (seventh from right), British High Commissioner Greg Quinn (second from right) and members of the Central Islamic Organisation of Guyana during prayers

 

 

By Ray Chickrie

President David Granger joined the Muslim community of Guyana on Sunday to break the Roza or fast that the Muslim community in Guyana is observing because it is the month of Ramadhan.

The British High Commissioner to Guyana, Greg Quinn and his wife also joined Granger at the Iftar dinner.

Granger spoke at the Ramadhan Iftar dinner, which was held at the Central Islamic Organisation of Guyana’s (CIOG) headquarters in Georgetown.

“Guyana is a multi-cultural country. We can be proud, however, of our religious tolerance and social cohesion. Guyanese must do as we are doing this evening; we are eating dates and breaking bread to acknowledge one another’s differences and to share our common humanity,” the president said.

Since coming to office, Granger has heaped praise on the Muslim community of Guyana for its charitable work and community activism.

He said that Ramadhan also promotes the virtues of fellowship and friendship.

“Service to God strengthens relations with others through acts of compassion and sympathy,” the president said.

Speaking on the significance of Iftar, Granger noted that, when shared with persons of other faiths, it represents the importance that Islam attaches to the acceptance of differences and promotion of religious tolerance according to a press release from the ministry of the presidency.

The CIOG’s director of education, Sheikh Moeen ul Hack, praised the leadership of the country for the respect it has afforded the Muslim community of Guyana. Muslims make up about 12% of Guyana’s population and they are Sunnis from the Hanafi, Turkish School of Islam.

“We will continue to play our role as Guyanese and as Muslims and we see our role as complementing that of the government,” the director assured the president.

He thanked Granger for supporting the CIOG’s education drive, noting that “education is the enemy of prejudice and, for us to move forward and to develop our country, our people will definitely have to be educated.”

Source*

Related Topics:

Displaced Refugees join Lebanese Mass Iftar to Mark World Refugee Day*

Egypt’s Ramadhan Street Banquet: Free Iftar Brings Hope*

Syria’s More Confident Assad gives Eid Prayers in Hama*

These 5 People don’t Spend Eid with their Families to make the Occasion Happier for Us*

Love for the Poor*

The Charity of Love

Generosity in Islam

The Quiet Miracle*

Syria’s More Confident Assad gives Eid Prayers in Hama*

Syria’s More Confident Assad gives Eid Prayers in Hama*

His visit comes as a car bomb in Idlib province kills at least 10 people

Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad attends prayers on the first day of the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Fitr, inside a mosque in Hama (Reuters)

 

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad delivered prayers for Islam’s Eid al-Fitr holiday in Hama on Sunday, the furthest he has travelled inside Syria in years, showing his growing confidence.

His visit came as a car bomb in rebel-held Idlib province killed at least 10 people, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights reported.

State television broadcast footage of Assad standing to pray in a large mosque in Hama behind its imam, with other clerics standing alongside and a large crowd of worshippers.

State news agency SANA quoted the preacher as saying that Assad’s presence in the city for Eid showed that victory and the return of security were only “a few steps” away.

Syria’s civil war has turned to Assad’s favour since 2015, when Russia sent its jets to help his army and allied Shiite militias backed by Iran turn back rebels and win new ground.

Since the war began in 2011, it has killed hundreds of thousands, driven millions more from their homes, sparked a global refugee crisis and drawn in regional and world powers.

The conflict is far from over. Rebels hold swaths of the country, including around Idlib province near Hama, and launched a new attack in Quneitra in the southwest on Saturday.

Rebels also hold the Eastern Ghouta area near Damascus, parts of the desert in the southeast and a large pocket south of Hama around the city of Rastan.

As recently as March, rebels advanced from Idlib province to within a few kilometres of Hama, before the army and its allies pushed them back in weeks of fierce fighting.

However, the army drove insurgents from their biggest urban stronghold in Aleppo in December and have also forced several important rebel enclaves to surrender over the past year.

First visit to Hama during war

Assad has not made a declared visit to Hama, which is about 185km from Damascus, since the war began. Last year he delivered Eid prayers in Homs, about 40km closer to Damascus.

Early in the crisis he visited Raqqa, a city that has since become the Syrian capital of Islamic State and now faces an assault by a US-backed coalition to drive out the militants

The fight against Islamic State, which has attacked Western cities, has become the focus of Western leaders, some of whom have softened demands that Assad must quit to end the crisis.

In March, U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said Assad’s fate would be decided by Syrians, a change in rhetoric after years of insisting he step down to allow a political solution.

France’s new president, Emmanuel Macron, said this month he did not see Assad’s departure as a condition to end the fighting and the priority was stopping Syria becoming a failed state.

The U.S. and other Western states, along with Turkey and Gulf monarchies, have long supported some of the rebels, an array of groups that includes Islamist and nationalist factions. Assad describes them all as terrorists.

His military has said its focus is on the campaign in the desert, where it is advancing against Islamic State to relieve a besieged government enclave in the city of Deir ez-Zor.

Car bomb in Idlib

A car bomb killed 10 people in Syria’s rebel-held Idlib province on Saturday, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, a Britain-based war monitor, reported on Sunday.

The attack occurred in a market in the town of al-Dana, located in the north of the province near the border with Turkey, according to the Observatory.

Three people under 18 were among the dead and the blast also injured at least 30 other people, it said. Another bombing in the town after midnight on Friday killed two people, it added.

Rebel groups in Idlib province have been sporadically fighting each other since early this year. Rebels have also accused the Islamic State militant group of carrying out attacks in the area.

Idlib province is a major stronghold of rebels in Syria and is situated along the border with Turkey, one of the main backers of their rebellion against Assad.

Large numbers of fighters, along with their relatives and many other civilians, have moved into the area under amnesty after surrendering to the army in other parts of Syria.

Source*

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Ron Paul: Why The Hell Are We Attacking Syrians Fighting ISIS?*

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Cabal’s New Tool Measures Resilience in Adolescent Syrian Refugees*

Turkish MP Sentenced to 25 Years for Exposing MIT Arms Aid to Terrorists in Syria*

What the Media Won’t Tell You about Syria*